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Daveed Diggs Lands Big Role in Black-ish

first_img Star Files View Comments Daveed Diggs(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Daveed Diggs Daveed Diggs certainly isn’t throwing away his shot! The Tony winner, who recently departed gargantuan Broadway hit Hamilton, has been tapped for the third season of ABC’s Black-ish. Variety reports that he’ll appear as Rainbow Johnson’s brother, Johan.Johan will be a laid-back hipster type, who is obsessed with his hair and a couple of trips he’s taken to France (we know he can do the accent!). Diggs’ character is set to make his debut early in the third season, which goes into production shortly. The series is scheduled to make its bow on ABC on September 21.As we previously reported, other projects on Diggs’ horizon include HBO sports mockumentary Tour de Pharmacy and the movie Wonder opposite Julia Roberts.last_img read more

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Extensions Announced at Public Theater Off-Broadway

first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 9, 2016 View Comments Updates from the Public Theater off-Broadway. First up, the final two installments in Richard Nelson’s acclaimed The Gabriels: Election Year in the Life of One Family have been extended an additional week. The second play of the trilogy, What Did You Expect, will now run through October 9. Tickets are now available for the final play in the cycle, Women of a Certain Age, which has been extended through December 4.What Did You Expect is scheduled to begin performances on September 10, officially opening on September 16. Women of a Certain Age is set to start on November 4 and open on Election Day, November 8. The company features Meg Gibson as Karin Gabriel, Lynn Hawley as Hannah Gabriel, Roberta Maxwell as Patricia Gabriel, Maryann Plunkett as Mary Gabriel, Jay O. Sanders as George Gabriel and Amy Warren as Joyce Gabriel.Meanwhile, Tiny Beautiful Things, based on the book by best-selling author Cheryl Strayed and adapted for the stage by Nia Vardalos with direction by Thomas Kail, has been extended two weeks to December 31. The new show is co-conceived by Marshall Heyman, Kail and Vardalos, and will also feature Vardalos as the anonymous online advice columnist “Sugar.” Tiny Beautiful Things is scheduled to begin previews on November 15 and will officially open on December 7.center_img Election Year in the Life of One Family, Play Two: What Did You Expect? The Public Theater.last_img read more

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Aaron Lazar & Wayne Brady to Star in West Coast Merrily We Roll Along

first_img Aaron Lazar, Wayne Brady and Donna Vivino will headline the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts’ previously announced production of Merrily We Roll Along. The Los Angeles production, directed by Tony nominee Michael Arden, will begin performances on November 23 and run through December 18.Lazar, who takes on the role of Franklin Shephard in the Stephen Sondheim musical, last appeared on Broadway in The Last Ship; his additional credits include A Little Night Music and The Light in the Piazza. Brady will play Charley Kringas. The five-time Emmy winner recently concluded a stint as Lola in Kinky Boots on Broadway. Vivino, who will play Mary Flynn, originated the role of Young Cosette in Les Miserables on Broadway and has gone on to appear in Wicked, Hairspray and Fame Becomes Me.The cast will also include Tony nominee Saycon Sengbloh (Eclipsed) as Gussie, Whitney Bashor (The Bridges of Madison County) as Beth and Amir Talai (What to Expect When You’re Expecting) as Joe Josephson. Rounding out the ensemble are Eric B. Anthony, Sandy Bainum, Melody Butiu, Doran Butler, Max Chucker, Sarah Daniels, Laura Dickinson, Kevin Patrick Doherty, Rachael Ferrera, Jennifer Foster, Travis Leland, Lyle Colby Mackston, Brent Schindele and Maximus Brandon Verso.Featuring a score by Sondheim and a book by George Furth, Merrily We Roll Along follows in reverse chronological order a stage and screen composer and the detrimental effects his success has had on his life, including his relationships with his collaborator Charlie and friend Mary. The musical premiered on Broadway in 1981—its brief run is explored in the new documentary Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened. View Comments Aaron Lazar(Photo: Bruce Glikas)last_img read more

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Tour trial gardens

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaSee the newest plants for gardens and landscapes as you tour theUniversity of Georgia gardens at the annual UGA Trial GardensOpen House July 10.The event will include self-guided tours of the gardens, a plantsale including Athens Select plants, and a book signing andpersonal guided tours by world-renowned UGA horticulture expertAllan Armitage.The tours are on the hour and book signings on the half-hourbetween 8:30 a.m. and noon. Tickets are $5 at the gate.The gardens, on the UGA Campus in Athens, Ga., were created in1983 and serve as a testing ground for more than 600 kinds ofannual and perennial plants. The primary functions of thegardens are research and teaching, and detailed information onall plants is provided to all who are interested.The gardens are planted twice a year. The summer trials areusually planted in April and May and have major and minor beddingclasses, plantings of specialty annuals, many free-standingcontainers and two large perennial beds.Each type of plant is evaluated every two weeks to providedetailed information on the cultivars being tested. Performanceratings are collected based on flowering, leaf color, uniformityof habit and flower, resistance to insects and diseases andoverall appearance.Researchers also select the best cultivars for each color in eachclass of annuals and list them under “Best of the Best.” Eachyear they select the four to six recipients of the Classic CityAwards, the very best plants in the gardens over the entireseason, well worth a place in any landscape.The winter trials are planted in October and November.The gardens serve research and teaching and are an importantresource for breeders, retailers, growers, landscapers andconsumers.For more information and directions to the gardens, visit the UGATrial Gardens Web site .last_img read more

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Summer skeeters

first_imgBy Elmer GrayUniversity of GeorgiaWith summer just around the corner, nuisance populations of Asiantiger mosquitoes are soon to follow. One of Georgia’s most commonmosquito pests, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedesalbopictus), thrives as temperatures rise.Asian tiger mosquitoes were introduced into this country inHouston, Tex., in the mid-1980s. Since then, they’ve spreadthrough much of the eastern United States. They’re not thought tobe major disease carriers yet in this country. But they areaggressive daytime biters, so considerable efforts are spenttrying to reduce their larval habitats.These mosquitoes are black and white, with a characteristicmedian, white stripe on the thorax, lateral stripes on theabdomen and striped legs. These markings and their aggressivedaytime biting make them fairly easy to identify.Mosquito havensThey prefer to breed in any kind of container that will holdwater. The container breeding and daytime activities make themhard to control through conventional practices such aslarge-scale treating with larvicides and adulticides.The best way to prevent nuisance populations is simply toeliminate all forms of standing water around our homes andneighborhoods. Target buckets, pet dishes, tarps, toys, usedtires and any debris that will hold water.And don’t just check once. Getting rid of standing water aroundour homes and neighborhoods should be a way of life, not aone-time or even a once-a-month routine.Asian tiger mosquitoes aren’t strong fliers. They often don’tmove more than 100 yards from where they hatch. So, if you have alot of them around your home, you won’t have to look far to findtheir larval habitat.Swarms of skeetersThat is far different from what many Georgia residents face inthe lower portion of the state. There, large lowland areasprovide ideal breeding sites for many native mosquito species.South Georgians don’t want to think of Asian tiger mosquitoes.They’ve been dealing with heavy populations of other mosquitoesfor more than two months as a result of the heavy rains in earlyspring and wet conditions stretching back to last year’shurricane season.Native flood-water mosquitoes have been particularly troublesomewhere most low-lying areas have been inundated with water forlong periods over the past eight months.Fortunately, no significant mosquito-borne disease outbreaks havebeen reported, although two cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitishave been reported this spring.DiseasesThese have involved a horse from Bacon County and a flock ofquail in Lanier County. Both are indicators that there is viralactivity in the local mosquito populations. People who live inthese areas should be particularly cautious.On the West Nile virus front, news has been quiet so far thisseason. As of May 16, no WNV-positive birds, horses, mosquitoesor humans have been reported this year.That’s not completely unexpected, since the peak period for WNVin Georgia continues to be August and September. The peak periodcoincides with hurricane season, and last year’s active seasonmay have suppressed West Nile activity.In Georgia, the primary carrier of West Nile virus is theSouthern house mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus). Thismosquito breeds regularly in storm drains and sewer systems,which are flushed of stagnant water by periods of heavy rain.In 2004, Georgia had 22 verified cases in humans, with one death.Three horses and 105 birds tested positive for the virus.Nationwide, 2470 human cases and 88 deaths were reported in 41states.(Elmer Gray is an Extension Service entomologist for theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

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Southeast recruitment

first_img“We decided to expand and start a southeast event to hopefully bring the same kind of numbers and awareness to that district for CAES.” she said. “The CAES alumni and the UGA southeast Extension in the area have played a huge role in getting this event up and running.”“We look forward to reaching out to potential students in eastern Georgia and telling them about the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,” said Joe West, assistant dean on the UGA Tifton Campus. “Overall, we’re pleased to meet the students and parents and let them know that a UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences degree is available to students in Athens, Tifton and Griffin.”High school students and transfer students can sign up by contacting UGA Tifton at (229) 386-3338 or Leanne Chafin at slwood@uga.edu. Applicants should register by Sept. 15. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences offers a variety of programs that can lead to careers in education, business, communication, economics and engineering—just to name a few.For the first time, students in the ninth through twelfth grades and college transfers in southeast Georgia will have the chance to learn about all of these opportunities at the UGA Southeast District Recruitment Event Sept. 22 at 5 p.m. Parents are welcome to attend.Located at the Toombs County Agricultural Center in Lyons, Ga., the inaugural event will provide a free meal, followed by a general informational session on CAES as well as two different sessions designed for high school and transfer students. Information about financial aid, admissions and the different majors will be available. An alumni panel will be present to speak and answer questions about their experience as a CAES student.“Our goal for this event is to show attendees the numerous opportunities that CAES has to offer them,” said Christy Bryan, academic programs recruiter for the UGA Tifton Campus. “We believe that there is something for almost everyone in the (UGA) College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and we want to help students find the fit that will help them grow to their full potential.”The event in southeast Georgia is modeled after a similar event held annually in southwest Georgia for the past five years. The event has been successful in helping promising students in that region of the state and has increased the number of both applicants and enrollment to CAES from the region.last_img read more

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Top 4-H’ers

first_imgJust shy of 260 Georgia 4-H’ers earned the right to compete for Georgia 4-H’s coveted Master 4-H’er title during the annual 4-H State Congress held July 24-27 at the Crowne Plaza Ravinia in Atlanta.The students competed and won first place in their regional competitions before traveling to Atlanta for the state competition.There, the students competed in a variety of categories ranging from photography to public speaking and communications to companion animal science. They gave 12-minute presentations before expert judges and prepared portfolios detailing their research, leadership and service projects. Michael Woods, the first place winner in the vocal competition, credits his 4-H mentors and advisers for honing his talents and creating in him “a sense of acceptance in a judgmental world.”“4-H has taught me to start from the bottom of the ladder of success and climb slowly to the top,” he said.First place winner Jaime Webb, a home-schooled student from Elbert County, says 4-H has taught her things she could never learn in a classroom. “Becoming a Master 4-H’er takes a lot of responsibility and discipline,” she said. “What better way to learn these life skills than getting up at the same time every morning to feed, run and always take the best care possible of 11 show animals.”This year’s Georgia 4-H winners, projects and donors, listed by their home counties are:APPLINGKatlyn Hall won the food safety and preservation category sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Gary Keve and Dr. Elizabeth Andress. She is the daughter of Michael and Teresa Hall.BANKSCourtney Gailey won the entomology category sponsored by the Georgia Pest Control Association and the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Entomology. She is the daughter of Chris and Gina Chappelear.BARTOWWill Murphy won the outdoor recreation category sponsored by Six Flags White Water. He is the son of David and Celia Murphy. BEN HILLTifara Brown won the performing arts – general category sponsored by Six Flags Over Georgia. She is the daughter of Lewis Brown and Kimberly Anderson.BLECKLEYEmily Tyus won the dairy foods category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Barrs. She is the daughter of Ben and Fay Tyus.BULLOCHKnapp Boddiford won the plant and soil science category sponsored by the Georgia Plant Food Educational Society, Inc. He is the son of Joe Boddiford and Susan Boddiford.CHATHAMKirsten Morris won the performing arts – piano category sponsored by Six Flags Over Georgia. She is the daughter of Mark and Martha Morris.CHEROKEEJanet Garner won the computers category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation and Georgia Power. She is the daughter of David and Diane Garner.CLARKELoran Posey won the physical, biological and earth sciences category sponsored by Georgia EMC. He is the son of L. Michael Posey and Cheryl Emerling Rogers. Morgan Wurst won the safety category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. She is the daughter of Charlie and Stacy Wurst.COFFEEPhaedra Vickers won the dog care and training category sponsored by the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association. She is the daughter of Kevin and Gina Vickers.COLQUITTAshleigh Childs won the food fast and fit category sponsored by Dr. M.K. Cook. She is the daughter of Joe and Susan Childs.COWETAAmy Goddard won the horse category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. She is the daughter of Tim and Cathy Goddard.CRISPAlec Joiner won the conservation of natural resources category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. He is the son of Joe and Tricia Joiner.DOUGLASJosh Townsend won the photography category sponsored by Georgia Magazine. He is the son of Rodney and Jenn Townsend.ELBERTJaime Webb won the sheep and meat goats category sponsored by Dr. and Mrs. Jim Williamson. She is the daughter of Scott and Robin Webb.EMANUELZachary Wood won the forest resources and wood science category sponsored by Mr. Bill Lott, Paulding Timber Products, Inc. and the Georgia 4-H Foundation. He is the son of Spencer and Wanda Wood. GORDONGibson Priest won the beef category sponsored by Dr. and Mrs. Jim Williamson. He is the son of Randy and Donna Priest. HALLJared Lee won the wildlife and marine science category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. He is the son of Jon and Jill Lee.HANCOCKMichael Woods won the performing arts – vocal category sponsored by Six Flags Over Georgia. He is the son of Davina Woods.HARALSONBrianna Holt won the fashion revue category sponsored by the Georgia Master 4-H Club. She is the daughter of Dorothea Graham.HART Ashley Hollinshead won the history category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation and the Clover Glove Race Series. Ashley is the daughter of Tom and Vicki Hollinshead. HOUSTONKevin Braski won the workforce preparation and career development category sponsored by Emerson Climate Technologies. He is the son of Pat and Christine Braski. Mallorie Talvan won the human development category sponsored by the Georgia Association of Extension 4-H Agents. She is the daughter of John and Margie Talvan.IRWINWelsey O’Quinn won the poultry and egg science category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. He is the son of Chad and Amy O’Quinn.JOHNSONRachael Allen won the power and energy category sponsored by Mike and Karen Garett. She is the daughter of Jimmy and Tamra Allen. Kathy Carpenter won the festive foods category for health sponsored by Publix Super Markets Charities, Inc. She is the daughter of Twan Broughan.LEEJake Hager won the veterinary science category sponsored by the Georgia Veterinary Medical Association. He is the son of Jason and Dana Hager. Hugh Slaton won the communications category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Volunteer Leaders Association. He is the son of Hugh Slaton and Lorna Slaton.LOWNDESClay Hurdle won the international category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation and Mrs. Eleanor Smith. He is the son of Greg and Janice Hurdle.MARIONA.J. Wells won the sports category sponsored by Six Flags White Water. He is the son of Jay and Fay Wells.MITCHELLErin Burnett won the general recreation category sponsored by the Georgia Recreation and Park Association, Inc. She is the daughter of Nelson and Judy Burnett.OCONEEMegan Beckett won the performing arts – dance category sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Burley Page. She is the daughter of Troy and Diana Beckett. Bailey Guthrie won the arts and crafts category sponsored by Ms. Marian S. Fisher, the Georgia 4-H Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. Ted Jenkins. She is the daughter of Larry and Rae Guthrie. Meghan Mitchell won the dairy and milk science category sponsored by Ms. Angela Broder Nemeth and the Georgia 4-H Foundation. She is the daughter of Stan and Scarlett Mitchell.PULASKIAndrew Day won the environmental science category sponsored by the Georgia Cooperative Council, Inc. He is the son of Ken and Kellie Day.RABUNIsaac Williams won the performing arts – other instrumental category sponsored by Six Flags Over Georgia. He is the son of Neal and Rhonda Williams.SCHLEYGrace Wooten won the companion animals category sponsored by Dr. and Mrs. William H. Sell, the Homeport Farm Market and Mr. and Mrs. Greg Price. She is the daughter of Marshall and Carey Wooten.SEMINOLEJohnelle Simpson won the public speaking category sponsored by AgGeorgia Farm Credit, Farm Credit Associations of Georgia, Mr. Kaleb McMichen and Cydor USA, Inc. She is the daughter of Twynette Reynolds.SPALDING Erin Kelley won the target sports category sponsored by the Callaway Foundation and the family of Col. James Boddie. She is the daughter of Lisa Kelley.TATTNALLNick Eason won the health category sponsored by Dr. Greg L. Jones. He is the son of Mary Eason. Nicholas Waters won the food fare category sponsored by the Georgia Development Authority. He is the son of Cliff and Ann Waters.THOMASHunter Nelson won the pork production category sponsored by the Georgia Pork Producers Association and Mr. Arch Smith. He is the son of Floyd and Robin Nelson.TIFTCaroline Dunn won the flowers, shrubs and lawns category sponsored by the Georgia Development Authority. She is the daughter of Jim and Patty Dunn. Deann Taylor won the fruits, vegetables and nuts category sponsored by the Meadows-Knox Family Fund. She is the daughter of Del and Pam Taylor.TURNERChristian Anna Coker won the family resource management category sponsored by Katrina Bowers and the Sarah L. Huff Fund. She is the daughter Mike Coker and April Coker. Rachel Lord won the textiles, merchandising and interiors category sponsored by the Georgia 4-H Foundation. She is the daughter of Paul and Sharon Lord.UNIONAndrew Smith won the housing, equipment and environment category sponsored by Mr. Bucky Cook. He is the son of Sandy Gribble.To learn more about Georgia 4-H, visit www.georgia4h.org.last_img read more

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Peach Crop

first_imgGeorgia’s peach crop will benefit from the cooler-than-normal winter. While temperatures have already hovered near or below freezing throughout the state on numerous nights this year, peach trees are thriving with their needed cooling hours.“Peaches have the potential to be really good as long as we don’t have a bloom followed by another cold snap,” said Phillip Brannen, a University of Georgia plant pathologist in Athens. “We have all the chill hours we need, and if we get a week of good warm weather, everything’s going to bloom at once.”Chill hours refer to the amount of colder weather a peach tree needs in order to sustain growth during the winter. If a tree gets enough of those hours, then the buds know instinctively that it’s okay to bloom in the spring. If not enough chill hours are attained, the bloom is delayed and often non-uniform. Delayed or protracted bloom caused by poor chill hours can make it very difficult for peach farmers to harvest as the peach fruit ripens at different rates due to delayed starts under those conditions. Total production could also be reduced.Brannen says the current chill hours for peaches are “nearly perfect.”“Once warm conditions arrive for a week or so, we should have a uniform and full bloom,” he said. “However, we really need it to stay warm after that, as a late freeze can really cause lots of damage if all the blooms are out at the same time or close to it.”Depending on how developed the blooms and young peaches are, a late-arriving cold snap can cause 100 percent loss, Brannen said.“The ideal scenario is for it to stay cold a little bit longer, then everything blooms and it remains warm,” Brannen said. “That’s what we would love to see.”According to the 2012 Farm Gate Value Report, peaches were grown on 11,029 acres in Georgia and generated a farm gate value of $33.8 million. Macon County produced the most peaches with 2,515 acres, followed by Peach County with 2,371.Peaches are the second most popular fruit grown in Georgia behind blueberries.last_img read more

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Alumni Awards

first_imgFarmers, advocates, entrepreneurs and educators topped this year’s list of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association’s best and brightest alumni.“We are excited about the 2017 honorees,” said Joel McKie, 2017 president of the CAES Alumni Association. “We are proud of their exceptional contributions and representation of our association.”The association presented the 2017 awards at a banquet held on Sept. 22 at the Classic Center in Athens, Georgia.In addition to the alumni awards, the association also inducted former Georgia Department of Transportation Commissioner Wayne Shackelford and pioneering poultry businessman Bill Baisley into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame.To find out more about these new inductees, visit tinyurl.com/GAaghalloffame2017.This year’s Alumni Awards of Excellence went to three CAES alumni who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. This year’s winners include:Keith Kelly, owner of Farmview Market in Madison, GeorgiaKelly, who graduated in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics, recently launched Farmview Market on U.S. Highway 441, south of Madison, Georgia. He built his career around supplying farmers with the tools they need.His company, Kelly Products, provides farmers with specialty plant protection chemicals and developed chemical registration software for state agricultural and environmental oversight agencies nationwide.In 1998, Kelly purchased the right to manufacture and distribute all Sevin insecticide products nationwide for home and garden uses. In 2005, Kelly purchased the 4,000-acre Rock House Farm in Leesburg, Georgia. The farm produces cattle, hogs, sweet corn and row crops. In 2016, Kelly expanded Rock House Farm to Morgan County, Georgia, where he established a dairy and creamery. Kelly’s latest venture, Farmview Market, is a combination butcher shop, farmers market and local gourmet shop. D.J. Sheppard, recruitment and retention coordinator for Georgia FFA and Georgia Agricultural Education programsD.J. Sheppard, who graduated in 1975 with bachelor’s degrees in animal science and agricultural education, worked in agricultural education classrooms in Georgia for 42 years and has impacted the lives of thousands of young people.During his years in the classroom, he sought to leave each student with a well-developed sense of responsibility and a better understanding of how farmers work in concert with nature to feed the world.Sheppard now serves as the recruitment and retention coordinator for Georgia FFA and Georgia Agricultural Education programs and helps new agriculture teachers settle into their positions.Jimmy Hill, retired Georgia Power engineerJimmy Hill, who received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering from CAES in 1971, worked for Georgia Power for 30 years. He focused on promoting the energy efficiency of heat pump systems to Georgians. He also worked with Vidalia onion farmers to develop controlled-atmosphere storage systems and served as the first chairman of the Georgia Food Processing Advisory Council.Hill is known by his friends and colleagues as an innovative problem solver and a passionate advocate for Georgia agriculture and farmers.Today, Hill works with faculty in CAES and the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences on the AgrAbility program, which enables farmers with disabilities to continue to farm. The alumni association also honored three young alumni with its CAES Young Alumni Achievement Awards. These awards recognize CAES alumni under 35 who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. The 2017 award winners include:Matt Coley, co-owner and manager of Coley FarmsColey, who graduated with his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 2003 and his master’s degree in agricultural economics in 2005, works with his father to run Coley Farms, the family’s Vienna, Georgia-based agribusiness.In addition to farming 3,400 acres of cotton and 300 acres of peanuts, the family operates Coley Gin and Fertilizer. Georgia Trend magazine recognized Matt Coley as one of 25 “movers and shakers” in Georgia agribusiness.Trey Cutts III, assistant professor and Cooperative Extension System specialist at Auburn UniversityTrey Cutts, who graduated with his bachelor’s degree in turfgrass management in 2007 and his master’s degree in crop and soil sciences in 2010, provides agronomic solutions to regional Extension agents through research and programming.After receiving his doctoral degree in plant breeding from Texas A&M University, Cutts worked with several international plant breeding institutions before returning to the Southeast U.S. to work for Auburn University.Farrah Hegwood Newberry, executive director for Georgia Milk ProducersFarrah Newberry, who graduated in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural communication, is the executive director for Georgia Milk Producers, an organization that educates dairy farmers and governing officials on issues affecting Georgia’s dairy industry.In her 17 years with Georgia Milk Producers, Newberry has guided the organization through monumental industry shifts and provided direct help to the state’s dairy farmers. She considers these to be her greatest professional accomplishments to date.Tracey Troutman, outreach and recruitment branch chief for the Office of Outreach, Diversity and Equal Opportunity within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Tracey D. Troutman, who graduated with her bachelor’s degree in avian biology in 2007 and her master’s degree in agricultural leadership in 2008, serves as outreach and recruitment branch chief for the Office of Outreach, Diversity and Equal Opportunity within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS).Troutman leads ARS’s outreach and recruitment initiatives, which include student employment and partnerships to recruit and retain the most talented students. She makes a point to be mindfully inclusive of traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. Troutman made strides toward meeting USDA’s recruitment goals by establishing the department’s student intern workshop, tripling the size of student programs under her direction.For more information about how CAES alumni shape the world, visit alumni.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Summer Drought

first_imgCurrent drought conditions could negatively influence Georgia peanut farmers’ plans for this year’s dryland crop, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut agronomist Scott Monfort.While some fields are just a few weeks away from harvest, Monfort cautions growers about applying additional fungicides or insecticides, especially if there’s little to no rain in the forecast, to aid in the crop’s late-season growth.“We need to assess what our crop situation is and see what’s out there so we can figure out what the best course of action is as we get closer to harvest,” he said.It is crucial for peanut growers to physically get into their fields and closely assess their crop.“If they’re not taking a look and they’re not paying close attention, they’re either going to lose what they’ve got or they’re going to put more money into it than what they need to,” he said.Monfort estimates that Georgia’s peanut crop hasn’t been this dry this late in the growing season since 2014. Since approximately half of the state’s crop is planted in dryland fields, or fields without irrigation, yields this year are expected to drop. “We should see a drop in the state average as a whole, but how much is hard to say,” Monfort said. “One positive is that our irrigated crop looks pretty good right now.”According to Wade Parker, Agriculture and Natural Resources program development coordinator for southeast Georgia, some counties in east Georgia haven’t received substantial rainfall since July 4.Georgia’s drought conditions are largely concentrated in the middle and southern portions of the state, according to the United States Drought Monitor.Middle Georgia counties Pulaski, Houston, Twiggs, Wilkinson, Bleckley and Laurens; along with southeastern counties Burke, Jenkins and Screven; and southwestern counties Early, Clay, Quitman and Randolph are experiencing moderate drought conditions.Counties near Georgia’s southern border, including Atkinson, Berrien, Clinch, Coffee, Colquitt, Cook, Grady, Thomas and Ware, are classified as having abnormally dry conditions.For more information about Georgia’s peanut crop, visit peanuts.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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