Lifeline for Rohingya children

first_img Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} “Unfortunately, we could not meet their requirement back then, which was to have a minimum of 25 pupils aged over five years,” he said.“We tried to get help from several non-governmental organisations but to no avail,” he added. Mohammad Hassan said they had to raise funds to start the school themselves.“We have had to close the school twice due to lack of funds. The Darul Hedayah Rohingya Academy has 39 pupils aged between four and 13. — Photos: RONNIE CHIN/The Star Mohammad Hassan says they had to close down the school twice due to lack of funds. “Luckily, things got better when I was made a coordinator to conduct refugee mental health assessment under the Australian Refugee Health Programme,” said Mohammad Hassan, adding 39 pupils aged between four and 13 were currently studying in the school.“The children learn Bahasa Malaysia, English, Mathematics, History and Islamic Studies,” he said, adding that there are eight volunteers teaching the children for free.A local university has provided funds to buy teaching materials so that lessons can be carried out more effectively at the academy.A volunteer, Hasnizah Jalaluddin, 57, began teaching the children about three years ago.The former teacher said teaching the children might be challenging but it was also rewarding.“It is not as easy as teaching Malaysian children but they are quick learners,” said Hasnizah, who teaches English and Mathematics. Rohingya children learning to read and write at the academy. “Some of my friends who are also teachers plan to volunteer here once they retire,” she added. Faruk Abdul Rashid, 11, felt lucky to be able to learn at the school.“My favourite subject is English because during class, we get to sing. I am happy to be able to read and speak in English.“When I grow up, I want to return home and become a policeman. I want to protect my family and my people,” he added.Muhammad Miran Abdul Razak, 12, said he did not know if he would return to Myanmar.“I was born in Malaysia and cannot speak my native language. My family and I used to live in Penang but my mother sent me here. “I’m happy to be with my friends here as we can learn and play together,” he added. Tags / Keywords: Children listening attentively to Hasnizah as Mohammad Hassan looks on. Metro News 08 Jul 2019 Why English is important Golf 08 Jul 2019 Two to win it: Winnie clinches Selangor Amateur title after playoff hole Central Region , Rohingya Related News “I realised many of them could not read or write. As there was an acute need, my friends and I decided to start a school for the children,” he added.Mohammad Hassan said getting funds to set up the school was not easy.“We went to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to seek financial help. A GROUP of Rohingya refugees have come together to set up a school for children from the community.The Darul Hedayah Rohingya Academy, which is located on the first floor of a shoplot near Jalan Lahat, Ipoh, was set up five years ago.Rohingya Association Perak branch chairman Mohammad Hassan Miya Huson, 36, said the academy is providing a lifeline to young children.“I have been living in Ipoh for almost 12 years. When I first arrived, there were only Rohingya adults but now many children are living here,” he said. Nation 09 Jul 2019 Ahmad Suadi is Ipoh’s new mayorlast_img read more

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