Police chief Bill Scott talks about his critics and his first 10

first_imgThere’s fake news, aggregated news, sponsored news. At Mission Local, you get real news, from reporters and editors who are accountable to you. After all, you know where we live and work. In the Mission, just like you. Keep us reporting, subscribe today.  He acknowledged those critics, and said their input had helped change the force. “Some of the most vocal folks are people who are really concentrating on those very weaknesses and flaws, which make us want to improve — at least me, from a personal standpoint as the chief of police, it makes me want to improve, to do better, because some of it, the most of it, is with very good reason,” he said. “So I don’t see it (criticism) as a concern. I see it as an opportunity. There are a lot of good things out there that can come from people pointing out where we need to improve.”As one example, Scott pointed to the change in the department’s Crisis Intervention Training. Although the department had been doing CIT training since 2011, he said, the criticism made them take a new look at it. Officers traveled across the country to look at best practices and today, he said, SFPD’s crisis intervention training is “on the forefront of that issue.” “That was a result of community input and community displeasure with how we were handling those issues,” he said. “Yes, I think the culture is shifting,” Scott added. “The culture can undermine policies if left unchecked and if it is a negative culture,” he said. “ I won’t go so far as to say this culture is a negative culture in that regard, but it has shifted in a number of ways.” Scott also addressed the issue of accountability, and said that in some instances, the system moved too slowly. So far, only six of the 18 officers allegedly involved in the texting scandal have left the force, he said. The other cases are caught up in litigation. While he said he would like officers held accountable in a more timely process — one that would be fairer to both parties — he said that moving too hastily could be reckless. “You’ve got the organization’s reputation at stake, people’s lives at stake, and that really needs to be thought through,” he said.  In the 50-minute interview, it was clear that Scott, an officer who rose through the LAPD and witnessed its reform from the vantage point of different ranks, is not a leader who goes for the pat answer, but one who engages with the complexity of criminal justice and the changing nature of police work. In the often-fraught relationship between police and communities of color, he saw no easy resolution, but he also offered some ways in which the department and the city could engage with communities of color and at-risk youth. Confronted with the question of the disproportionate number of traffic stops on African Americans, Scott spoke of the cycles of crime that can throw the statistics “out of whack.” Indeed, use-of-force data released by the SFPD for the third quarter of 2017 showed that blacks, who make up less than six percent of the city’s population, made up 24 percent of traffic stops. What’s more, even though the group made up only 24 percent of the stops, they comprised 45.6 percent of searches as a result of those stops. “A lot of these things are so deeply rooted in other issues that what we need to look at is not just the context of the stops, but everything that feeds into it,” Scott said.He said that one of the possible examples of why people of color are disproportionately searched is because they are more likely to be on probation or parole. “Then you have to go back and say, well, how come so many of that group is on probation or on parole?” he said. “It’s kind of a self-feeding, vicious circle.” Scott said he felt the police department can often be the “tip of the spear” in confronting the social inequities foisted onto — and perhaps perpetuated by — the criminal justice system. The department, he said, needs to examine its role. “But you can’t escape the fact that in our society, there are so many issues that feed into what we’re talking about here, let’s not ignore those issues as well,” he said, emphasizing the relationship between inequities in the education system and those of the criminal justice system. “Those numbers are skewed against people of color as well,” he said. “We (the police department) need to own our part of it, but let’s not ignore the rest of it.” To that end, Scott talked about the need to prevent crime through more community organizations and wrap-around services for at-risk youth. The city, he said, is short of those services. He said an abundance of non-violent offenders are introduced into the criminal justice system at an early age with few viable exits.“What do you get to try to break that trajectory of getting more deeply ingrained into this life of things that are counterproductive, not only to society but to your own well-being?” he asked. “What do you get?” “I don’t think the capacity has caught up with the idea that there are other ways to treat these symptoms other than prison,” he said. “I don’t think there’s enough community-based organizations that are funded to treat this part of our society — and that’s a huge part of our society.” But the chief recognized that his department needs to do its part in building relationships with certain communities in the city. This, he said, should come through more frequent face-to-face “sitdowns” with young people in at-risk communities, who are often leery of police. “Because when you sit down face-to-face with people as two human beings, and you’re talking about these issues in a non-confrontational setting, it’s a totally different environment, and then you can really get to what some of the issues are,” he said. “That needs to happen a whole lot more.”  Yet building those relationships, he said, is not always easy, as he believes that the department “is doing good community police work,” but the audience for that work is often composed of people who are already inclined to engage with officers. “What’s more difficult is having that dialogue with people that don’t necessarily want to engage or care to engage, because what’s in their mind about law enforcement is negative,” he said. “That’s what’s more difficult.” In terms of general community relations, Scott said that in the next few months residents will be seeing a more standardized way in which their local district stations interact with them. For years, community engagement has been at the purview of the local captains, but now it is a command staff division, and there will be minimum requirements across the city — including monthly meetings, a newsletter and advisory boards. “Where we fell short, according to the assessment report, was that there was not this overarching strategic community policing culture that was being driven from the top of the organization through the organization,” he said. “So that’s changing, and I think the officers are understanding the importance of that.” Finally, Scott addressed questions about the fate of 272 recommended reforms from the U.S. Department of Justice, which in September ended its formal oversight of SFPD’s progress.Later that month, Scott told the Board of Supervisors that, in the Justice Department’s absence, he intends to “replicate and go beyond” the reform structure the federal body put forth. This, he said, means hiring personnel to finish a progress report, as well as a final report that was to be completed at the end of the 18-month reform process.  “Who will take the place of the U.S. DOJ is in the works right now,” he said, noting that the department will “hopefully disclose something in the next couple weeks.” Scott said he’d like to “go beyond” the Justice Department’s structure by contracting several more “follow-up” reports after the 18-month effort is complete. “So we can report as to whether the recommendations that we put in place are really being sustained,” he said. The follow-up, he said, is to “make sure this is not just something we’re doing just to check a box. We’re really trying to change the DNA of the department in a good way.” The interview was part of a collaboration, Covering the Police,  with students from the Graduate School of Journalism at Berkeley and included Charlotte Silver, Luis Hernandez, Carlos Mureithi, Zoe Ferrigno, Marian Carrasquero, Nikka Singh, Sam Goldman, Susie Neilson, Emma Schwartz, JoeBill Muñoz, Kaitlin Benz, Mallory Newman, Bo Kovitz and Lydia Chávez. 0%center_img In an interview with Mission Local this week, Police Chief Bill Scott talked about a range of issues, including the culture shift in the force he took over nearly a year ago, the need for more services to keep at-risk youth from falling deeper into the criminal justice system and new minimum requirements for community engagement.Formerly the deputy chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, Scott did not arrive at an easy time. “There were a lot of vocal opinions that we needed to improve in a lot of areas, which is why I got here in the first place,” said Scott. “But on the other hand there are a lot of people in this city that think the SFPD is doing a pretty good job, not that we don’t need to improve, but that we’re doing a pretty good job.” Scott’s hiring was precipitated by a series of incidents that put the police at odds with communities of color: a batch of blatantly racist and homophobic text messages exchanged by officers were exposed and a number of controversial police shootings occurred. By May 2016, after police shot and killed a 27-year-old woman — the third officer-involved shooting in one year — Mayor Ed Lee asked for former Police Chief Greg Suhr’s resignation.  Still, the city did not completely embrace the new chief. Critics disrupted his swearing-in ceremony in January, and it was no secret that the Police Officers Association preferred an insider. But Scott has proceeded, seemingly resolute in making the SFPD a better force. It’s too soon to tell whether he will succeed in making changes that will endure, and if he will be able to gain the trust of the SFPD’s critics.    Tags: police • SFPD Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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THE Saints v Salford game KO 8pm on Friday Febru

first_imgTHE Saints v Salford game (KO 8pm) on Friday February 10 is DEFINITELY ON.Saints staff have been working overtime all week with giant covers and heaters to ensure that this historic game takes place.TICKETS ARE ON SALE RIGHT UP TO KICK OFF and 15,000 tickets have been sold to date.Tickets are available from the ticket office at Langtree Park or by calling 01744 455 050.You can also log on to www.saintssuperstore.comThe Great Tom Van Vollenhoven visited the Club yesterday and was more than impressed by the stadium as our pictures show.last_img

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SAINTS held their annual Player of the Year Awards

first_imgSAINTS held their annual Player of the Year Awards at Langtree Park last night and James Roby was named Player of the Year.Sponsored by Robinsons, the event saw more than 200 people pack into the Hatton’s Travel Sponsors Lounge to mingle with the first team squad and hear from the likes of Chairman Eamonn McManus and Head Coach Nathan Brown.Pete Emmett MC’d proceedings.Award Winners:Player of the Year: James RobyRunner up: Paul Wellens Young Player of the Year: Matty Dawson Players’ Player: James RobyFounder Members POTY: Paul Wellens Founder Members Young POTY: Mark Percival Under 19s Player of the Year: Lewis Charnock U16s Scholarship Player of the Year: Josh EavesFor a full report of what happened on the evening, plus words from the winners themselves, buy the matchday programme this week.last_img read more

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The game kicks off at 12 noon at the Trailfinders

first_imgThe game kicks off at 12 noon at the Trailfinders Sports club.Saints squad will be chosen from:K Brown, T Nisbet, C Brown, C Follin, J Gibbons, B Billsborough, R Horne, M Lees, J Eaves, E Bullen, A Eckley, M Weldon, C Hazard, J Olmez, P Nash, S Royle, B Sims, C Kellet, S Croston.last_img

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This coupled with coming off the back of the prev

first_imgThis, coupled with coming off the back of the previous loss to Warrington, made the clash with the Tigers’ an interesting proposition.But your Saints came through 24-22The U16s have found it challenging in recent weeks to match the performances shown in the opening rounds of the competition and this game was no exception.The Tigers roared into a 12-point lead in the opening five minutes scoring on successive sets down their left-hand side.The raison d’etre of the Scholarship and Academy competitions is not necessarily to win a championship but is to produce the next supply of Super League players to the parent club.However, if you can do the two at the same time then everyone is happy and the recovery of the Saints over the rest of the half shows a maturity beyond years.They started by repelling the tigers over the next two sets, then in the next ten minutes they gained good field position culminating in a Taylor Pemberton knock-on with the line begging.The fightback started with the introduction off the bench of the two props Will Toone and the rapidly improving Zack Lee. Along with Ben Betts, both had drives which put the Saints on the front foot giving the mercurial Lewis Dodd space to attack the line. He ghosted through a gap to the full-back before feeding Harvey McDaid speeding up in support to open the Saints account.The Saints continued to take the game to the Tigers and on the stroke of the break that man Dodd stepped through the Tigers line and around the full-back to score under the sticks. His second conversion levelling the scores.The call from the coaching staff was to nil the opposition. But that wouldn’t be the Saints, would it?We’d rather entertain the paying the public by mirroring the first half and conceding two tries, the second a fortuitous rebound off a Saints foot, in the opening 10 minutes to fall 22 – 12 behind then coming back to win it.So, let’s start again shall we?Again the fightback started with Will Toone. Two repeat sets on the Tigers line resulted in the big prop taking the ball up well on the first tackle of the third set. Two tackles later and the ball came back to Toone on the burst 20 metres out (well that was his impression – don’t let him measure you up for carpets!), I made it two but whatever the distance the six points put the Saints back in with a shout.On the next set they were level as a fourth tackle chip into Hellfire Corner from Dodd coupled with a great chase from Jack Stephenson forced the Tigers to spill the ball over the line allowing Dodd to touch down for the score.Crucially he missed the conversion leaving the scores level with a quarter of an hour to go.Having been whooping and hollering at their 10-point lead 10 minutes ago it was a much quieter Tigers side which tried manfully to keep the waves of Saints attack out.Firstly, Ryan Appleton had a try disallowed for a forward pass which the locals thought was harsh and then Lewis Baxter knocked-on over the line to keep the scores tied.But with four minutes to go the visitors were penalised for a head high tackle and from 30 metres out to the left of the posts Dodd calmly slotted the winning goal.The Saints were not at their best in this game against a combative Tigers side led by the dangerous left centre Graham Bradley, but they stuck at it and, unlike the Warrington game, found a way to get back into the dog fight.As ever Lewis Dodd was the star but the prop quartet of Jamie Pye, Harry Brooks, Will Toone and Zack Lee laid the platform for the others to play off.This was by no means as good a performance as that against our nearest and dearest earlier in the season but the squad as a whole are growing together and becoming better for it.Match Summary:St Helens U16s:Tries: Harvey McDaid (22), Lewis Dodd (34 & 55), Will Toone (53). Goals: Lewis Dodd 4 from 5.Castleford U16s:Tries: Graham Bradley 3 (3, 5 & 38), Taylor Cartwright (44). Goals: Graham Bradley 3 from 4.Half Time: 12-12 Full Time: 24-22Teams:Saints: 1. Harvey McDaid; 5. Theo Robinson, 3. Jack Taylor, 4. Ben Betts, 2. Ryan Appleton; 6. Taylor Pemberton, 7. Lewis Dodd; 8. Harry Brooks, 9. Keenan McDaid, 10. Jamie Pye, 11. Evan Jones, 12. Lewis Baxter, 13. Ethan Caine. Subs: 14. Paddy Maher, 15. Joe Spencer, 16. Zack Lee, 17. Will Toone, 19. Jack Stephenson.Castleford: 1. Keanu Bean; 2. Leo Marchant, 3. Jack Johnson, 4. Graham Bradley, 5. Harrison Spence-Horton; 6. Bailey O’Connor, 7. Iwan Orr; 8. Sam Hall, 9. Archie Craggs, 10. Myles Tait, 11. Taylor Cartwright, 12. Nathan Carter, 13. Corey Hodgson. Subs: 14. Kieron Lawton, 15. Billy Marsh, 16. Louis Collinson, 17. Lewis Ransome, 18. Jacob Horte, 19. Jack Rowbotham.last_img read more

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Red Cross in need of blood donations over the holiday season

first_img “The Red Cross is thankful for the generosity of donors who help keep hospital shelves stocked with lifesaving blood products, but we know that the holiday activities that we cherish most can make it difficult for many regular donors to find a moment to donate this time of year,” said Maya Franklin, External Communications Manager, Carolina Blood Services Region. “We hope technologies like online appointment scheduling, the Blood Donor App and RapidPass will make it a little easier for donors to give more life for patients this holiday season.”Patients don’t get a holiday break from needing lifesaving transfusions, and all blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply is available. Appointments can be made by downloading the free Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). To learn more about RapidPass, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.Upcoming blood donation opportunities Nov. 20-Dec. 15Brunswick CountyRelated Article: Dog dies during late night apartment fire in WilmingtonBolivia11/29/2017: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Brunswick Community College, 50 College RdLeland12/1/2017: 2:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m., Brunswick Forest Community Blood Drive, 2701 Brunswick Forest ParkwayShallotte12/5/2017: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., St Brendan Roman Catholic Church, 5101 Ocean Hwy WestNew Hanover CountyCarolina Beach12/13/2017: 1 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., The Lazy Pirate Carolina Beach, 701 N. Lake Park Blvd.Wilmington11/20/2017: 12 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Porters Neck Country Club, 8405 Vintage Club Dr11/20/2017: 1 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street11/20/2017: 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m., Lowe’s Home Improvement Porters Neck, 191 Porters Neck Rd.11/22/2017: 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street11/24/2017: 8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street11/27/2017: 1 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street11/28/2017: 10:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., University NC Wilmington, 601 S. College11/29/2017: 7 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., New Hanover Regional Medical Center, 2131 South 17th. Street11/29/2017: 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street11/29/2017: 11:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., New Hanover Regional Medical Center, 2131 South 17th. Street12/1/2017: 8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/1/2017: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., New Hanover County Employees, 320 Chestnut St.12/4/2017: 1 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/6/2017: 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/8/2017: 8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/11/2017: 1 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/13/2017: 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th Street12/15/2017: 8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Wilmington Blood Donation Center, 1102 South 16th StreetPender CountyBurgaw12/12/2017: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Pender Memorial Hospital, 507 E. Fremont12/13/2017: 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Pender High School, 5380 Hwy 53 WestHampstead12/4/2017: 1:30 p.m. – 6 p.m., Hampstead United Methodist Church, 15395 US Hwy 17How to donate bloodA blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements. WILMINGTON, N.C. (PRESS RELEASE) — The holidays are known for the giving spirit and a hectic pace. This holiday season, the American Red Cross is sharing three ways to give the gift of life in less time. At this time of year many regular blood and platelet donors delay giving due to busy schedules– but the need for blood remains. To help donors fit in a donation, the Red Cross offers three easy ways to make helping save lives faster and more convenient: RapidPass® – Donors can complete their pre-donation reading and health history questions online to save about 15 minutes at their donation. In September, RapidPass became available on mobile devices, giving donors the ability to complete their RapidPass from a smartphone, tablet or computer. Blood Donor App – Through the Red Cross Blood Donor App, users can find local blood drives and donation centers, schedule an appointment, receive appointment reminders and keep track of total blood donations – all from the palm of their hand. Online appointment scheduling – Donors can conveniently schedule an appointment and find tips for a successful blood or platelet donation at redcrossblood.org. – Advertisement – last_img read more

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Truck gets stuck under overpass on McRae Street in Wilmington

first_img The truck was wedged under the overpass, which had a sign posted indicating a 12′ 11″ clearance.The tires of the truck had to be deflated so it could back out the way it came in.While all this was going on, drivers were asked to find an alternate route around the accident by the Wilmington Police Department. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Traffic was detoured Tuesday on McRae Street in downtown Wilmington for a short time when a truck, attempting to drive under an overpass, got stuck.It happened near the intersection of McRae and Bess Streets around noon.- Advertisement – last_img

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Eight lucky couples to receive free Valentines Day weddings

first_imgValentine’s Day 2017 ‘Love is in the Air’ event(Photo: WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – Eight lucky couples will be selected to tie the knot for free in Downtown Wilmington on February 14, thanks to an event called “Love is in the Air.”The New Hanover County Register of Deeds first held the event on Valentine’s Day in 2017, and is continuing to spread the love in 2018.- Advertisement – Each couple’s wedding will last one hour and will be held in a decorated room with seats for guests, a photographer, and more.Interested couples must have recently purchased a Marriage License, and can sign up online or in person.last_img

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Wilmington firefighter adopts dog rescued during Vance Street home fire

first_img Wilmington Firefighters Pfeffer and Richardson were conducting a primary search of the residence when they discovered Katie in a back room, according to a department public information officer. They say that the dog was trying to hide from the smoke and her body was becoming overcome by the inhalation of the toxic smoke.Katie was rescued and brought outside to receive immediate medical treatment from Wilmington Firefighter Bransford according to WFD public information officer Natosha Vincent.Katie was later transported by Wilmington’s Assistant Chief Tom Robinson to a local emergency animal hospital where she was treated for smoke inhalation. After spending several days in the animal hospital, Katie was discharged Saturday from the hospital and is doing well.Related Article: Deadly California wildfire ‘taking down everything in its path’After being rescued from that burning house by Wilmington’s bravest, this lucky pup has found herself a second chance at life and happiness.She is expected to make a full recovery and is at her new home, with her new owner, Firefighter DeVilbiss, from the Wilmington Fire Department.The Wilmington Fire Department would like to take this opportunity to remind our citizens of that June is National Pet Preparedness Month.For more tips about how to be “Pet Prepared” for any disaster, go tohttps://www.ready.gov/animals orhttp://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/blog/national-pet-preparedness-month/ Firefighter DeVilbiss with Katie (PHOTO: WFD) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – One week ago, Wilmington police responded to a home along Vance Street where they believed an alleged armed robbery suspected was.Wilmington Police arrested 26-year-old Saead El Helo after they say he barricaded himself in a home in South Wilmington. They say before he was taken into custody, El Helo set the home on fire. In that home was a dog named Katie.Katie receiving treatment on scene of the Vance Street fire (PHOTO: Natosha Vincent WFD)- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Celebrate National Lighthouse Day at Old Baldy

first_img Old Baldy was completed on April 2, 1817, making it the oldest standing lighthouse in North Carolina and the nation’s 13th oldest lighthouse. The lighthouse designated the harbor of the Cape Fear River and the Port of Wilmington. Old Baldy helped in the economic growth of both the lower Cape Fear River and Wilmington.The National Lighthouse Day Festival is on Sunday August 5 and includes a 10k and 5k evening race, children’s games, reenactments, beer, BBQ and more. Festivities kick off at 4 p.m., race registration begins at 6 p.m. and the race is at 7 p.m. To register, click here.For more information, visit the Old Baldy Foundation’s website at oldbaldy.org or follow them on Facebook. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — National Lighthouse Day is celebrated annually by organizations throughout the country on August 7 and this year, you can join in on the fun at Bald Head Island.The Old Baldy Foundation is holding a National Lighthouse Day Festival to honor Old Baldy’s contributions to the area’s history with a festival that the whole family can enjoy.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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