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Growing numbers of homeowners are focused on property upgrades

first_imgJohn and Emma Stubbs renovated their home in Annerley. Photo: JACK TRANYoung Brisbane homeowners are leading the way in renovating their properties to accommodate growing families, according to a new report.Three quarters (76 per cent) of Australian homeowners are on a home renovating journey, up 12 per cent since 2015, Westpac’s Home Ownership Report shows.Of those, almost half (47 per cent) are considering renovating their home, one in five (20 per cent) are now renovating, and 70 per cent have undertaken past renovations.The nationwide study commissioned by Westpac found renovating was now the highest priority for nearly one third (32 per cent) of homeowners considering a house-related activity in the next five years.Gen Y was found to be the generation most likely to be considering renovating in the future (46 per cent), compared with Gen X (39 per cent) and then Baby Boomers (31 per cent).Annerley’s Emma Boddington-Stubbs and architect husband John Stubbs, both 39, have been renovating their home for the past 10 years.“The previous owners wanted us to buy it over others because we planned to return its architectural character rather than a new development,” Mrs Boddington-Stubbs said.“While it is our home and John’s place of business, it is also an investment for the future.”Mrs Boddington-Stubbs said they had lived in several apartments and wanted to own a home so they could have some dogs and put items on the wall where they wanted.She said renovating the house had involved “a lot of work”. We made a rookie error and started renovating before asking the bank for a loan,” she said.“They took one look at the house and said they would give us a fraction of what we wanted to finish it.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours ago“As a result, our renovations have been self-funded, which, while tough, will mean a far greater profit for us when we come to sell.”Ray White Indooroopilly agent Desley Arnold said many Gen Ys were wanting to get their foot in the door, and get off the rent cycle.“Inner suburbs are providing excellent opportunities to pick up an older property with the right address, school catchments etc, and then allowing them the time to be able to renovate when affordable,” Arnold said.“Units and apartments are also proving popular as a first home, with the option to renovate for themselves, or use as equity to purchase a house in the same area.“Suburbs in the inner west are ideal for these buyers as many owners are original, having been in the area for 40-plus years and the homes are solid and perfect for renovation.”She said if seeking the right address for schools and easy access was important, then buying a new house was not usually an option for the Gen Ys in these areas, due to the high end asking price, however purchasing an older home and renovating was.Westpac Group head of home ownership Chris Screen said the competitive housing market had inspired a surge in home renovations.“With rising property prices and intense competition for property in metro areas, many homeowners are looking to renovate their existing property rather than sell and risk losing their position in the market,” Screen said.last_img read more

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Siblings fall in buy-bust

first_imgResidents Jessa Pagalilawan and herbrother Jestonie yielded the suspected illegal drugs valued around P120,000, apolice report showed. Drug suspects Jessa Pagalilawan and her brother Jestonie. BCPO The suspects were detained in thelockup cell of Police Station 1, facing charges for violation of Republic Act9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PN Bacolod City – Suspected shabu weighing about 10 grams was seized in abuy-bust operation in Barangay 13. Jessa and Jestonie were nabbed afterthey sold suspected shabu to an undercover officer for P500 around 4:15 p.m. onDec 11, the report added.last_img

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Samsung heir apologizes over corruption scandal

first_imgSEOUL – The heir to the Samsung empire bowed in apology Wednesday for company misconduct including a controversial plan for him to ascend to the leadership of the world’s largest smartphone maker. Lee Jae-yong is vice-chairman of Samsung Electronics and was jailed for five years in 2017 for bribery, embezzlement and other offences in connection with the scandal that brought down South Korean president Park Geun-hye. “We are recognized for our top-class technology and products but the public eye towards Samsung is still critical,” Lee said./PN The 51-year-old was released a year later on appeal but is currently undergoing a retrial. Lee Jae-yong is vice-chairman of Samsung Electronics and was jailed for five years in 2017 for bribery, embezzlement and other offences. POOL/AFP / KIM HONG-JIlast_img read more

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Journalist discusses effect of Trump’s deportation rhetoric

first_imgJulia Erickson | Daily TrojanCurrent affairs · Journalist Pilar Marrero and professor Sherry Bebitch Jeffe discussed immigration and the election at Wednesday’s event.A journalist specializing in immigration politics spoke about the treatment of immigrants in the United States and the importance of immigration rhetoric in the 2016 presidential election Wednesday at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center.Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a professor at the USC Price School of Public Policy, spoke with Pilar Marrero, a journalist for La Opinion, the largest Spanish-speaking newspaper in the United States. The event, “A Conversation with Pilar Marrero: Toxic Immigration Rhetoric and America’s Future,” was hosted by the USC Judith and John Bedrosian Center on Governance and the Public Enterprise at the Price School. Marrero is the author of Killing the American Dream, published in 2012, which archives the last 25 years of immigration policy and the struggles surrounding it in the United States. She has a long history of speaking on social and political issues that deal with the Latino community. She is also covering the 2016 presidential campaign for ImpreMedia, a major Spanish-speaking media outlet.At Wednesday’s event, Marrero spoke about the political climate around immigration in America and the different approaches each presidential candidate has toward the issue. A recent Gallup poll showed that two-thirds of the Americans oppose the immigration plans advocated by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, which involves building a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border and deporting illegal immigrants. The poll also found that 84 percent of Americans favor a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants living in the United States, a plan that is backed by the Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.“This opinion about immigration among the American public changes depending on the moment and the economic conditions,” Marrero said. “In terms of the national Gallup measures, you find that opinions on immigration changed right after 9/11. It started changing slowly until today, when most of the Americans see immigration as positive.”According to Marrero, politicians are usually out of step with what majority of the population wants, which is why immigration faces gridlock in Congress despite the apparent national consensus.“The last time there was an effort to pass immigration reform, it passed in the Senate and it was stopped and never voted on in the House,” Marrero said. “The reason is because House members are elected in small districts, as opposed to the Senators, who are elected state-wise. The politics in small districts are very different from states like California.”Marrero said that the elites of both major political parties have been disconnected from their base for a while, which has led to anger among voters who are dissatisfied for economic and social reasons, along with racial issues.“If you look back in our history, right after the Great Depression, working-class whites along with Mexican agricultural workers were suffering,” Marrero said. “But Mexicans and immigrants were the scapegoats, and close to a million were deported.”Marrero related this historical pattern of behavior to the way that politicians approach current immigrants. According to Marrero, stricter immigration laws enacted after 9/11 affected regular immigrants more than those suspected of being terrorists. At airports, non-citizen workers were fired and different laws were filed targeting immigrants.“Men from several Middle Eastern countries had to register, and a lot of laws were passed that in reality affected the larger population of immigrants,” Marrero said. “There were really not a lot of terrorists caught at the time.”Marrero said that the problem lies in the fact that the emphasis is on enforcement of current immigration policies and not on reform.“I think this is a history that continues to go around, and we are seeing it coming back, year after year,” Marrero said. “We are a country that idealizes its immigrant past, but we don’t want to really deal with our immigrants.”last_img read more

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