Tag: 上海喝茶的地方你懂

GMP announces dividend

first_imgGREEN MOUNTAIN POWERANNOUNCES QUARTERLY DIVIDEND COLCHESTER, VT . . . Directors of Green Mountain Power Corporation (NYSE:GMP) have announced a quarterly cash dividend of $0.22 per share on the utility’s Common Stock, payable December 31, 2004 to holders of record at the close of business on December 17, 2004. The indicated annual dividend rate is $0.88. Green Mountain Power Corporation (www.greenmountainpower.biz(link is external)) is a Vermont-based energy services company serving 89,000 electric customers.– 30 —last_img

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Search for missing 27-year-old ended after body found on beach

first_imgThe US Coast Guard has ended their search for a 27-year-old man who went missing while swimming near the Fort Pierce Inlet State Park over the weekend, after a body matching his description was discovered on a beach.Anthony Graham’s body was discovered on a beach near Pepper Park Beachside on North Hutchinson Island Monday.Authorities say Graham’s family contacted them around 5:00pm Saturday after they could no longer find him in the water.The US Coast Guard searched continuously for Graham through the weekend but could not locate him.It wasn’t until 7:00 am Monday when a passerby contacted authorities about the discovery of a body that matched Graham’s description that the coast guard ended their search.last_img

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Russian to the rescue as Prokhorov saves Nets

first_imgThe idea that a Russian would someday buy an NBA team was even more preposterous. The entire country couldn’t scrape together enough rubles for that.Now Prokhorov owns the New Jersey/Brooklyn Nets. And, if his debut under the spotlight in New York is any indication, the American sports oligarchy will never be the same.Sure, Mark Cuban is entertaining, but what could be more fun than a 6-foot-6 self-deprecating multibillionaire who cracks jokes and doesn’t flinch at the idea of taking on the Knicks on their own turf?“I come in peace,” Prokhorov said May 19.Russians, it turns out, do have a sense of humor.Prokhorov will need it, and more, because of the tall task that awaits him. The Nets are a miserable franchise, so mired in losing that David Stern should have handed them the No. 1 draft pick instead of allowing the Ping-Pong balls to drop the way of the Washington Wizards.Prokhorov invested $200 million and a promise of many millions more with little to show for it other than membership in the NBA and a future new arena in Brooklyn. He didn’t get the No. 1 draft pick, and he doesn’t know if the many talents of LeBron James will even be up for a bid.One week into his new job, though, he’s already talking about going up against the Knicks for fans and the Lakers for championships. How he plans to turn the beleaguered Nets around isn’t quite clear, but he insists he does have a plan.“If I tell you, I’d have to kill you,” he told reporters in New York.Funny guy, this Russian whom Forbes recently ranked No. 39 among the world’s billionaires with assets of $13.8 billion. Other reports say he’s worth closer to $18 billion.Suffice it to say he is rich enough to barely blink when he lost a $53 million deposit recently on a chateau in France. Rich enough to have a $45 million yacht he barely uses because he gets seasick easily.Whether that’s enough to get LeBron may determine the viability of Prokhorov’s plan to win an NBA title within five years. Though the Nets have plenty of cap money that would have gone unused under the previous ownership, there’s a handful of other teams that can also sign James to the maximum contract.If Prokhorov’s first days of ownership are any indication, though, he may prove a hard man to turn down.He showed up at the draft lottery to personally represent the Nets, a task most NBA owners relegate to their underlings. Clearly, he intends to be the public face of the franchise, a role most owners in the league shun—except for Cuban—and he cut an imposing figure in his first real public appearance.Prokhorov began the day by having breakfast with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Nets part-owner Jay-Z, then moved on to a brunch with reporters, where he made his first move by unceremoniously dumping general manager and interim coach Kiki Vandeweghe.There will be many more moves soon, as expected when someone inherits a team that lost 70 games in a season. Most interesting, though, may be the moves Prokhorov makes that have nothing to do with the team he puts on the court.He seems to have intentions of fulfilling Stern’s goal of making the NBA an international brand all by himself, and he surely has the reach and resources to do it. The Nets may have trouble winning over die-hard Knicks fans, but imagine the fan base he could build for the team in Russia.“With exceptional international exposure no other team can reach, there will be fans of the Nets from New Jersey to Brooklyn to Moscow,” Prokhorov predicted.Stern loves this guy so much he quickly brushed off any questions about foreign ownership of an NBA team when Prokhorov came forward. Easy to see why. With him, Stern has a rock star owner with deep pockets who will spread the gospel of the NBA wherever he travels.Thirty years ago, Bird and Johnson helped save the NBA by ushering in a new era of superstardom that captured the imagination of a teenager in the Soviet Union.The task is easier for Prokhorov. He just has to save the Nets. ‘I COME IN PEACE’—New Jersey Nets new owner Mikhail Prokhorov, of Russia, speaks to reporters during a news conference, May 19 in New York. by Tim DahlbergAP Sports Columnist (AP) —Mikhail Prokhorov got a chance to meet Larry Bird the other night, though he could be forgiven if he didn’t recognize him. The Bird he knew, after all, was the young blond he saw in grainy videotapes wearing tight shorts and taking on Magic Johnson.A lot has changed in 30 years, not the least of which is the shorts.Back then, the Cold War was still raging. The U.S. and Soviet Union boycotted each other’s Olympics, and the idea that one day they might compete in sports without political overtones seemed preposterous.last_img read more

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Serena Williams wins in tutus at US Open

first_imgSerena Williams twirls after defeating Carina Witthoeft, of Germany, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)NEW YORK (AP) — It’s all about the tutu for Serena Williams at the U.S. Open.Just days after French Tennis Federation President Bernard Giudicelli said her black catsuit with clot-preventing compression tights “will no longer be accepted,” Williams chose a one-armed black tutu-style dress by Off-White’s Virgil Abloh to take on Magda Linette at the Open. She won.Perhaps her sparkly shoes emblazoned with her name and “queen” also helped.On Wednesday night, playing against Carina Witthoeft, Williams was in another tutu dress that’s part of her new collaboration with Nike and Abloh, who is also men’s artistic director for Louis Vuitton. Anna Wintour looked pleased as she watched Williams beat Witthoeft.The Queen Collection is inspired by Williams’ love of dance. She paired the black look with a leather biker jacket. The dresses have sheer panels on one shoulder and long sleeves on the other. Williams tugged hard on the sleeve as her Wednesday match began.Serena Williams, of the United States, reaches for a shot from Carina Witthoeft, of Germany, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)The 23-time Grand Slam winner wore compression fishnets with her tutu looks to guard against blood clots, a problem she battled soon after giving birth last September.Retail, prices range from $130 to $900 for various pieces in the new collab.last_img read more

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Serena Williams’ treatment resonates among Black women

first_imgWillingham isn’t a tennis star, but she is a Black woman. She and others like her say Williams’ experience resonates with them because they are often forced to watch their tone and words in the workplace in ways that men and other women are not.And if they’re not careful, they say, they risk being branded “Angry Black Woman.”“So much of what she experiences we experience in the workplace, too,” said Willingham, a professor of criminal justice at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh. “As Black women … we’re expected to stay in our lane, that lane that has been created for us. Any time we step out of that lane, then we become a problem.”The stereotype of the “Angry Black Woman” is alive and well, said Felicia Martin, 36, a federal employee who lives in Brooklyn. She recalls once seeing a white female co-worker cursing and throwing things and not facing repercussions, while she’s been told to calm down for expressing her own upset in a normal tone of voice. Martin and others pointed to a cartoon by an Australian artist as the clearest example of the stereotype facing Black women. Mark Knight of Melbourne’s Herald Sun depicted Williams as an irate, hulking, big-mouthed Black woman jumping up and down on a broken racket. The umpire was shown telling a blond, slender woman — meant to be Osaka, who is actually Japanese and Haitian — “Can you just let her win?”“I was deeply offended. This is not a joke,” said Vanessa K. De Luca, former editor in chief of Essence magazine, who wrote a column about the U.S. Open furor.The cartoonist “completely missed the point of why she was upset,” De Luca told The Associated Press. “It was about her integrity, and anybody who doesn’t get that is perpetuating the erasure that so many Black women feel when they are trying to speak up for themselves. It’s like our opinions don’t matter.”Some Black women say they have to worry perpetually about how they’re coming across to make sure they’re not dismissed as angry or emotional. In this Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, file photo, Serena Williams, right, talks with referee Brian Earley during the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, in New York. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger, File) Retired professional tennis player Zina Garrison defended tennis player Serena Williams after Williams was hit with three code violations that led to a $17,000 fine at the U.S. Open final, saying some of the chair umpire’s calls were unfair. (Sept. 10)“If I’m upset about something, I should get to express that to you,” Martin said.During Saturday’s championship loss to Naomi Osaka, Williams got a warning from the chair umpire for violating a rarely enforced rule against receiving coaching from the sidelines. An indignant Williams emphatically defended herself, denying she had cheated. A short time later, she smashed her racket in frustration and was docked a point. She protested that and demanded an apology from the umpire, who penalized her a game.Many people, Black women among them, echoed Williams’ contention that she was punished while men on the tennis circuit have gotten away with even harsher language.Serena Williams argues with the chair umpire during a match against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women’s finals of the U.S. Open tennis tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, in New York, on Sept. 8, 2018. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP, File)“A lot of things started going through my head in that particular situation. You know, first and foremost, what was going to be said about her the next day? The typical angry black woman, you know … when she really was just standing up for herself and she was standing up for women’s rights,” said former tennis champion Zina Garrison, who is Black. “A woman, period, is always, when we speak up for ourselves, then you have the situation where people are saying, you know, they’re too outspoken. They’re acting like a man, all of that. But then a Black woman on top of that, the angry Black woman, who does she think she is?” Serena Williams hugs Naomi Osaka, of Japan, after Osaka defeated Williams in the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) “It’s exhausting,” said Denise Daniels, 44, of the Bronx, who works in professional development for educators. “It does diminish from the work satisfaction that other people get to enjoy because it is an additional cost.”Willingham thinks that was part of Williams’ experience on Saturday as well, but that it was also about a career’s worth of frustrations that she has had to endure, such as when the French Open banned the type of catsuit she wore.“I felt it for her. I felt she was fed up, she was tired of this,” Willingham said. “How much is she supposed to take, really? How much are any of us supposed to keep taking?”___Associated Press video producer Noreen Nasir contributed to this report from Washington.___Deepti Hajela covers issues of race, ethnicity and immigration for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/dhajela. For more of her work, search for her name at https://apnews.com. NEW YORK (AP) — When Serena Williams told the umpire at the U.S. Open final that he owed her an apology, that he had stolen something from her, and then she got penalized for her words, Breea Willingham could relate to her frustration and anger.last_img read more

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