5 PH footballers begin camp, nurse dreams of trip to Munich

first_imgView comments The five were chosen after the National Youth Futsal Cup organized by Allianz PNB Life, PFF and Henry V. Moran Foundation last May.The four-day AJFC, now on its ninth edition but with the Philippines in the lineup just this year, is being held at Finns Recreation Club under the supervision of FC Bayern coaches led by Klaus Augenthaler and retired striker and AJFC ambassador Giovane Elber.“Have fun and enjoy,” Sollorin remembered the coaches telling them.Indonesia, China, Malaysia, Laos, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Singapore also sent their players aged 14 to 16. The final cast will fly to Munich on Aug. 17 to 22 to meet the FC Bayern players, train under the coaches of the German club and watch the Bundesliga 2017-2018 opening match at Allianz Arena.One participant will also get the Good Sportsmanship award which is equivalent to a one-week scholarship later this year at Aspire Academy, an internationally-renowned sports institution in Doha, Qatar.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo “They get shy around the other kids,” said Landagan. “At the same time, they’re still very playful.”“I told them to interact with the other kids and assert themselves on the field,” he added.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsKonrad Keim Sollorin of Ateneo de Iloilo, Aeron Tenollar of Baguio City, JM Mitra of De La Salle Zobel and Gawad Kalinga Football Program’s Jasper Beruan and Jeofrey Fresado arrived here Monday and began camp the following day.They were accompanied by Allianz PNB Life brand director Rei Abrazaldo. Mitra’s parents and Sollorin’s father are also here. Former FC Bayern Munich striker Giovane Elber (fourth from left) joins PH’s Konrad Keim Sollorin, JM Mitra, Jasper Beruan. Aeron Tenollar and Jeofrey Fresado at theAllianz Junior Football Camp at Finns Recreation Club in Bali, Indonesia.BALI, INDONESIA—More than skills training and the much-coveted trip to the FC Bayern junior camp in Munich, Germany, camp directors want the 49 teenage players participating in a football clinic here to learn teamwork and improve on their character.Coach Jess Landagan of the Philippine Football Federation (PFF) said the five Filipino players, all aged 14, at the ongoing Allianz Junior Football Camp (AJFC) have yet to overcome their timidness and develop concentration.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’center_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games LATEST STORIES Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Battle on top: SMB, Star collidelast_img read more

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Study Brain cells involved in memory play key role in reducing future

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 18 2019Brain cells involved in memory play an important role after a meal in reducing future eating behavior, a finding that could be key in understanding and fighting obesity, according to a study led by Georgia State University.The study suggests neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region that is vital for personal memories, inhibit future eating behavior by consolidating the memory of the preceding meal. The findings are published in the journal eNeuro.Two-thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and overeating is a major cause of this epidemic.”Memories of recently eaten foods can serve as a powerful mechanism for controlling eating behavior because they provide you with a record of your recent intake that likely outlasts most of the hormonal and brain signals generated by your meal,” said Dr. Marise Parent, associate director of the Neuroscience Institute and professor of neuroscience and psychology at Georgia State. “But surprisingly, the brain regions that allow memory to control future eating behavior are largely unknown.”Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaHippocampal cells receive signals about hunger status and are connected to other brain areas that are important for starting and stopping eating. The researchers set out to determine if disrupting hippocampal function after a meal is eaten, when the memory of the meal is being stabilized, could promote eating later when these cells are functioning normally.They tested this prediction using an advanced method called optogenetics that uses light to control individual cells. Using this technique to inhibit hippocampal cells after rats ate a meal caused the animals to eat their next meal sooner and caused them to eat almost twice as much food during that next meal, even though the cells were no longer inhibited while the animals ate their next meal. This effect was observed regardless of whether the rats were offered rodent chow, a sugar solution or water sweetened with saccharin.The researchers found it interesting that rats would eat more saccharin after they interfered with their hippocampal function because this noncaloric sweetener produces very few gastrointestinal chemical signals generated by food. They concluded the effect they saw was most likely explained by an effect on memory consolidation, rather than by an impaired ability to process gastrointestinal messages.The findings have significant implications for understanding the causes of obesity and the ways to treat it. This research supports the idea that techniques that promote hippocampal-dependent memories of what, when and how much one eats could prove to be promising strategies for reducing eating and promoting weight loss. Source:https://news.gsu.edu/2019/01/17/researchers-identify-brain-cells-likely-involved-in-memories-of-eating-that-influence-next-meal/?utm_source=press-release&utm_medium=media&utm_campaign=eatinglast_img read more

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Diabetes drug can halve the risk of late miscarriage preterm births for

first_imgIn pregnant women with PCOS, treatment with metformin from the end of the first trimester may reduce the risk of late miscarriages and preterm births.”  Professor Eszter Vanky Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Metformin can halve the risk of late miscarriage and preterm births for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).PCOS occurs in 10 to 15 per cent of all women. The symptoms are irregular menstrual periods, increased levels of male sex hormones and small ovarian blisters. In addition, many women with PCOS are overweight. Women with PCOS also have an increased incidence of impaired fertility, miscarriages, gestational diabetes, premature births and pre-eclampsia. Professor Vanky leads the research group “Women’s Health – PCOS” at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)’s Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine. An article in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal presents the results of nearly two decades of research from NTNU and St. Olavs hospital. Consultant Tone S. Løvvik is the first author, and the study is part of her doctoral work. Professor Sven M. Carlsen is co-supervisor.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplant’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesHowever, the research group surprisingly found no reduction of gestational diabetes among this cohort of women with PCOS.Examined 800 womenFrom 2000 to 2017, the research group carried out three controlled studies of nearly 800 pregnant women with PCOS. The studies were conducted at 15 hospitals in Norway, 4 hospitals in Sweden and one in Iceland. Half of the women were given metformin (2000 milligrams daily) from first trimester to delivery. The rest of the women were given a placebo.In addition to a lower risk of late miscarriage and preterm births, the researchers also found that the women who received metformin gained less weight during pregnancy.A higher level of male sex hormones is associated with several of the symptoms of PCOS. The causes of the condition are not known, but may be related to lifestyle, inheritance and intrauterine fetal life.The group found no effect on pre-eclampsia, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure or to what extent newborns of women with PCOS needed intensive care.No effect on diabetes”Perhaps the most remarkable finding was that metformin had no effect whatsoever on either the incidence or severity of gestational diabetes,” Vanky notes.Metformin is a well-known drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and in some countries regarded as equivalent to insulin as a first-line drug therapy for gestational diabetes.The three studies that form the basis of the conclusion were carried out according to Good Clinical Practice principles and will have an impact on the follow-up and treatment of pregnant women with PCOS and likely also of other pregnant women.Another part of the study followed up children of mothers with PCOS who used metformin, and a control group that was given a placebo. Source:The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)Journal reference:Løvvik, T.S. et al. (2019) Use of metformin to treat pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PregMet2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(19)30002-6.last_img read more

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Detecting and blocking cyberbullying

first_img Provided by Inderscience Bullying is as old as humanity, but in today’s world of ubiquitous and always-connected devices, there is a whole realm of bullying that can take place out of sight but be just as devastating to its victims – cyberbullying. Detecting and so having the opportunity to prevent cyberbullying in open online forums and social networking sites, for instance, requires technology that can automatically detect trollish and thuggish behaviour. Once detected, the problems that victims face might be addressed but more importantly, the cyberbullies might be shut down or otherwise punished. Writing in the International Journal of Autonomic Computing, a team from India reveals their algorithm which detects and weighs the words in forums and calculates whether or not particular clusters of words are associated with cyberbullying behaviour.The team explains the problem and why it matters so much: “Cyberbullying has emerged as a major problem along with the recent development of online communication and social media. Cyberbullying has also been extensively recognised as a serious national health problem, in which victims demonstrate a significantly high risk of suicidal ideation,” they write. They add that “This proposed framework shows better results while the action is to stop the online users becoming the victims of cyberbully.” Citation: Detecting and blocking cyberbullying (2019, February 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-blocking-cyberbullying.html Two-thirds of young people victims or perpetrators of cyberbullying, study suggests More information: J.I. Sheeba et al. Improved cyberbully detection techniques using multiple correlation coefficient from forum corpus, International Journal of Autonomic Computing (2019). DOI: 10.1504/IJAC.2018.097620 Credit: CC0 Public Domain Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Suedzucker CEO still sees no turnaround in tough market

first_imgFILE PHOTO: A company logo of Suedzucker Group is pictured at the headquarters in Mannheim, Germany March 12, 2019. REUTERS/Ralph OrlowskiHAMBURG (Reuters) – The CEO of Suedzucker (SZUG.DE), Europe’s largest sugar refiner, said on Thursday that trading conditions remained intensely difficult with low sugar prices and no turnaround likely for the company’s current financial year. “Our group forecast for the current financial year still shows no visible turnaround,” CEO Wolfgang Heer told the annual meeting of Suedzucker shareholders. He added: “Sugar prices remain at a low level which does not cover costs.” He said in an advance release of his speech that the company’s restructuring plan in its sugar sector, which includes closures of sugar factories in Germany, France and Poland, is on schedule. But the first financial benefits will be seen in the second half of the company’s 2020/21 financial year. Reporting by Michael Hogan; Editing by Michelle MartinOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

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