Tag: 上海龙凤交流

Champlain scholarship aimed at new magnet school students

first_imgA celebration of two new elementary schools focusing on sustainability and the arts in Burlington was highlighted today with the announcement of dual Champlain College scholarships aimed at helping graduates of the magnet schools attend college.The Holly and Bob Miller Magnet School Scholarship for the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes and The Lois McClure Magnet School Scholarship for the Integrated Arts Academy  at H.O. Wheeler were established earlier this year by Champlain College to honor the Millers and Mrs. McClure for their community support of continuing education. The need-based scholarships will provide up to $20,000 a year in tuition expenses for two students who attend Champlain College. The main requirement is attendance at one of the magnet schools for four years, followed by continued education in Burlington School District schools and graduation from Burlington High School (BHS). The first scholarships will be awarded to members of the BHS Class of 2018.“These scholarships, established as part of honoring these three community leaders with honorary degrees from Champlain College in May, reflect their ongoing support for continuing education for Burlington’s young people,” said Champlain College President David Finney. “The magnet school concept for Burlington will help focus students on their interests, improve student and parent engagement in education and ultimately bring socio-economic integration at the two schools.” “We are so appreciative of the incredible community partners that play an integral part of our new magnet programs, and enhance all of our schools.  We are honored that Champlain College has created this new scholarship program that provides a tremendous opportunity for our students,” noted Burlington School Superintendent Jeanne Collins.A magnet school, according to Victor Prussack, coordinator of the Burlington program, is a public school that offers a specialized program and is open to school children from around the city of Burlington. While there are more than 4,000 elementary magnet schools across the country, these are the first such schools in Vermont. “These dynamic alternative schools were created by the Burlington School District to offer options for children and families who seek a unique learning environment.”Students from all over Burlington as enrolled in the Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler and the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes. Students study the same things as all elementary school children, including literacy, math, science, social studies, art, music, Spanish and physical education. Special programs at both schools integrate community studies outside the classroom and in partnership with organizations such as Shelburne Farms, Flynn Center, Very Merry Theatre Company.The celebration included a parade of students and teachers from both schools down Church Street Marketplace, led by Sambatucada, to the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Vermont. Commissioner of Education Armando Vilaseca and Burlington School Superintendent Collins welcomed the students, parents and community partners to the event and thanked supporters, partners and funders of the new schools. More information about the magnet school program is available at www.bsdvt.org(link is external) or by contacting Victor Prussak at vprussac@bsdvt.org(link sends e-mail).Champlain College, founded in 1878, offers “Education in Three Dimensions” – a distinctive educational approach to professionally focused majors, developing life skills and leadership based on critical and creative thinking. It has nearly 2,000 campus-based undergraduate students on campus and is ranked in the top tier of Best Baccalaureate Colleges in the North by 2009 America’s Best Colleges, published by U.S. News & World Report. To learn more about Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edu(link is external). Source: Champlain College. BURLINGTON, Vt., (Sept. 24, 2009) —last_img read more

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Eko Roni uses shoulder lock to finish off Murugan Silvarajoo in first round

first_imgIndonesian national wrestling champion Eko Roni Saputra put forth a spectacular performance, dominating newcomer Murugan “Wolverine” Silvarajoo of Malaysia to earn a first-round victory in the ONE: REIGN OF DYNASTIES, which was broadcast on Friday.At the sound of the opening bell, Eko quickly chased Silvarajoo across the Circle. The Indonesian unloaded a series of powerful boxing combinations against the fence, as Silvarajoo covered up. Taking the Malaysian down to the mat, Eko advanced to the bout-ending submission, using his feet to tweak Silvarajoo’s shoulder in a joint lock maneuver to force the tap shortly after.“I appear more comfortable now because I train a lot in striking, boxing and Muay Thai. I don’t want to just rely on my take-down wrestling skills, but I start my game with striking, then I start the take-down,” Eko, who trains at the EVOLVE MMA gym in Singapore, said. In the main bout, reigning ONE Strawweight Muay Thai and Kickboxing World Champion Sam-A Gaiyanghadao of Thailand successfully retained his Muay Thai World Title with a near-flawless performance against ISKA K-1 World Champion and number one ranked contender Josh “Timebomb” Tonna of Australia.Sam-A appeared composed and relaxed to start the bout, delivering a volley of fast boxing combinations and high round kicks in the first round. In the beginning of the second, Sam-A dropped Tonna with a bullet-like left straight, sending the Australian to a mandatory 8-count. Sensing he had his opponent hurt, Sam-A poured on the pressure and dropped Tonna two more times en route to a technical knockout victory.In another round, former ONE World Title challenger and current fifth-ranked flyweight Reece “Lightning” McLaren of Australia may have boosted himself up the divisional ladder based on his most recent showing. The Gold Coast native drew up a dominant performance, knocking out three-time IBJJF No-Gi European Champion Aleksi “The Giant” Toivonen of Finland in the first round.Topics :last_img read more

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Coming off injury-plagued season, Bachini determined to stay on court

first_img Published on January 29, 2013 at 11:31 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Breanna Bachini’s 6-0, 6-4 win Friday against Boston College’s Julia Casselbury wasn’t just a routine victory.For the sophomore from Sacramento, Calif., the rout was the culmination of months of hard work to recover from injuries that threatened to end her tennis career.“It was the most amazing feeling,” Bachini said. “Just being on the court. I can’t really describe the feeling, but it’s just like pure bliss out there.”Bachini was sidelined for the majority of last season with two injuries. She pulled a stomach muscle that sometimes forced her to serve underhand in matches. Bachini also battled plantar fasciitis.The injuries forced her to idle during the summer. She only resumed practicing Jan. 2.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBachini sacrificed a normal high school experience to play tennis. She only began attending high school her senior year and went twice a week. The rest of the week she trained four hours a day on the court and one hour in the gym.So when doctors told Bachini the chronic nature of her plantar fasciitis might force her to consider quitting the game of tennis altogether, she was devastated.“Those were the hardest words to hear,” Bachini said. “I’m an athlete. This is what I’ve been doing my entire life. I didn’t want to quit and give up. I just wanted to keep on going.”Bachini wasn’t about to relinquish her dream without a fight.She was the top-ranked player in Northern California before deciding to come to Syracuse.Bachini came to SU because she knew the program would help her achieve her ultimate goal, which was, and still is, to become a professional tennis player, she said.“I don’t quit,” Bachini said. “I’ll never, ever say those words. I kept at it in the gym. I ate healthy. I knew I was going to come back.”Her return to the court caught the eye of her teammates.Sophomore Komal Safdar said Bachini’s everyday hard work off of the court gave her a new perspective.“For her to come out and not only beat her opponents, but to be able to destroy them pretty much, it just shows that she was doing what she could when she was injured, ” Safdar said. “Honestly, I think she’s more determined than ever.”Bachini credited her teammates and coaches for being supportive and encouraging her to keep fighting.Assistant coach Shelley George said she’s thrilled to have a player of Bachini’s character back on the court.“Breanna fights through every situation that she’s ever been in,” George said. “Whether it’s off the court or on the court. Win or lose, you know she’s going to go out and fight her tail off.”Bachini has played with determination since coming back. She followed up her season-opening win at Boston College with a more decisive win at home, defeating Navy’s Sam Droop 6-1, 6-0. She was the first player to finish her singles match Sunday.“I was just in my zone,” Bachini said. “I don’t really focus on what’s around me. I focus in on my match and what I need to do.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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FAR FROM HOME AND LIVING HERE: ‘THE IRISH ARE NICE TO US BUT THEY DON’T ASK US TO MEET, WE ARE SEPARATE’

first_imgSPECIAL REPORT: YOUNG JOURNALISTS from the group Headliners investigate racism in Donegal. This is their article:Although police statistics suggest Buncrana is not a racist place, there are people from other countries living here who find life very difficult and lonely as they struggle to fit in.There are others who may be suffering in silence as many are afraid to report incidence of racist abuse. We wanted to give these young people a voice. We wanted to hear their stories so others can be aware of just how hard it is for them.Robert (13) came from Romania two years ago. He said: “I found it most difficult making new friends, it was hard to get to know them but once I got to know them, we were good friends then. I think the rest of my family find it hard fitting in too.”Fourteen-year-old Ola from Poland agreed. She said: “It was difficult at the start. At first it was the language, I couldn’t speak it at all, but now it is that I only have Polish friends. The Irish are nice to us but they don’t ask us out to meet, we are separate.“We came about five and a half years ago because my Dad needed a job and there wasn’t much in Poland. I was scared leaving, I didn’t know the language, I had to make new friends, the school was new, everything was completely new. I had to leave behind my grannies, my cousins -nearly all my family – it was just me, my parents and brother.” Jadzia, who is 13, also had to leave behind most of her relatives when she moved to Buncrana from Poland six years ago.Jadzia said: “I was 7 when we moved so I didn’t have a say, I didn’t want to move but we had to because we were finding it very difficult in Poland. It was hard but there was no other choice. I had to leave behind most of my family, though my uncle and cousins came a year later. I feel sort of different to other young people here.“Racism is caused by people who see others differently and judge them for what they see,” she added.Robert said: ““I think racism is caused when people don’t understand why people are different.” While none of the young people we spoke to felt they had been the victim of a racist attack, they all hoped that they would be able to tell someone, such as a teacher, if they were. But Ola added: “I don’t know, maybe I’d be too scared.”However, all three believed that Buncrana was a good place to be – apart from the weather, for Ola! Robert said: ““My advice to anyone coming here would be – don’t worry, people are friendly” while Jadzia said: “My advice is not to be scared of Irish people, they’re not really that scary.”We hope that by highlighting the experiences and opinions of some of the young people who have come to live in Buncrana from other countries that we will help other young people understand the impact of racism and prejudice better and help them interact with young people from different countries and cultures in a friendlier way.About this story: WRITTEN BY YOUNG JOURNALISTS FROM HEADLINERSBy Megan (15), Shauna (14) and Robert (13) FAR FROM HOME AND LIVING HERE: ‘THE IRISH ARE NICE TO US BUT THEY DON’T ASK US TO MEET, WE ARE SEPARATE’ was last modified: April 22nd, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:buncranadonegaldonegaldailyHeadlinersracismlast_img read more

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