Disaster declared for North Slope Borough damage from fall storm

first_imgA section of seawall in Utqiaġvik, AK that was damaged during a September storm that was recently declared a Federal Disaster. (Photo courtesy of Alaska Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management)In late September, Utqiaġvik was hit by an Arctic storm that lasted several days and caused over $6 million in damages to public structures.Listen nowOn Thursday, President Trump approved Governor Walker’s request for a disaster declaration for that storm. It’s the second time in three years that the North Slope Borough has received a disaster declaration for such an event; the last time was in 2015.The recent disaster declaration means that funding is now available from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, to rebuild those public structures that were damaged. Thomas Dargan is the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations on the North Slope.“There was high wind gusts up to 47 miles per hour, a storm surge two feet above normal high tide,” Dargan said.A storm of that magnitude isn’t especially severe for Utqiaġvik, but Rick Thoman, a climatologist with the National Weather Service Alaska Region, says what’s changed in recent years is the lack of sea ice — both nearshore, and out on the Arctic Ocean.“The wind basically acts as a plow pushing the water ahead of it and it piles into the land,” Thoman said.The result is often water damage to berms, roads, and buildings. Dargan says that one of the structures that needs repair in Utqiaġvik is a shoreline berm meant to protect the city from storm surges. The same berm was damaged and rebuilt back in 2015.In addition to receiving money to fix damaged structures, the relief comes with funds for mitigation — or protective measures — for the future.But building better storm protection isn’t easy. Dargan worked on the federal storm recovery effort in 2015 and says that when it comes to rebuilding structures like the shoreline berm, there are complicated engineering problems. And it’s not clear that they have a better option than to just keep rebuilding it.“We’re not quite sure what that long term solution might be,” Dargan said.The federal relief comes almost a year after the town of Newtok was denied a Disaster Declaration. FEMA currently doesn’t have a way to fund slow-moving disasters, like the large-scale coastal erosion that’s taking place in Newtok. In contrast, the damage to Utqiaġvik was triggered by a single, distinct event.last_img read more

Read More

This Hilarious Chatbot Wastes Scammers Time So You Dont Have To

first_img Researchers Discover Two More Cases of Facebook Data ExposureJapan Beefs Up Cybersecurity Ahead of 2020 Tokyo Olympics There’s a poignant moment in Godzilla 2014 where Ken Watanabe realizes that the only way for humanity to deal with the threat of the monsters is to stand back and “Let them fight.” The folks at New Zealand cybersecurity company Netsafe must have had the same idea, only instead of giant lizards, the monsters they’re dealing with are scam emails. They’ve come up with a hilariously effective anti-scam defense tool called “Re:scam,” a chatbot that wastes scammer’s time so you don’t have to.Check it out!Ignoring and deleting a scam email is an easy way to avoid some personal headaches, but it just kicks the can down the road instead of solving the bigger problem. The scammer will then just immediately target someone else. What makes Re:scam so brilliant is that it acts almost like a fly trap for shady online characters.After you forward the scam email to me@rescam.org, the AI will then begin conversing with the scammer. As the video demonstrates, the AI is sophisticated enough to give scammers false hope. The chatbot will seem like it’s genuinely interested in Russian brides or Nigerian prince treasures or whatever.However, like a ace prank caller, throughout the conversation the AI will do tons of little things, frustrating for scammers and funny for us, to prevent the discussion from actually going forward. It’s like Borat endlessly asking about cheese. You can see some excellent examples of Re:scam and its purposeful obtuseness in action in this Scribd thread by The Guardian. There are some real chef’s kisses in there.Eventually, you have to figure scammers would realize they’re jogging in place talking to a dead end on loop and move on. But still, all the time wasted chatting with Re:scam is time spent not targeting a real person. We better not get too comfortable giving AI these menial tasks, though. It’s the perfect prologue to a machine revolt.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on targetlast_img read more

Read More