African-Americans, Koreans try to heal deep wounds

first_imgThe 350 marchers who made the recent 1.4-mile trek down Wilshire Boulevard from Koreatown to MacArthur Park made up in symbolism what they lacked in numbers. Actor Danny Glover and civil-rights attorney Connie Rice marched alongside Korean merchants and churchgoers, Los Angeles Police Department officers and activists from Homies Unidos. African-Americans, Koreans, whites and Latinos sought to underscore an ethnic unity they hope marks a dramatic change since the 1992 riots that destroyed 2,000 Korean businesses and exposed wide rifts between Koreans and other minority groups. The march meant to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the riots suddenly served as a memorial for the 32 Virginia Tech students killed April 16 by Korean student Seung-hui Cho, creating fears of a racist backlash among Korean-Americans. “The Korean-American community is really concerned,” said Kyeyoung Park, an associate professor of anthropology and member of the Center for Korean Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Particularly here, where the Korean-American was scapegoated in 1992 civil unrest.” Fifteen years ago, Korean merchants, especially those working in South Los Angeles, became the target of black rioters in what Koreans came to know as “sa-i-gu,” which translates to April 29. “People think the riots were only about Rodney King, but it was more than Rodney King,” said Chester Tate, an African-American who lives near the intersection of Florence and Normandie, the flashpoint for the four days of violence. “It was also over incidents like the Latasha Harlins killing over a bottle of juice.” Latasha was a 15-year-old African-American girl who was fatally shot on March 16, 1991, by Soon Ja Du, a Korean-American store owner in South Los Angeles. A security camera captured images of the teen putting a $1.79 bottle of orange juice into her backpack. Du apparently saw this but did not notice that the girl had then approached the store counter with money in her hand. African-Americans and Koreans now say there has been noticeable improvement in relations between the two groups in the past 15 years – progress that was emphasized by last week’s march. “There is still deep pain,” says Lee Jung-Hui, whose son, Edward, tried to protect Koreatown merchants but was killed when one of them mistook him for a looter and shot him. “But we all must learn to forgive one another and change the world for the better.” tony.castro@dailynews.com (818) 713-3761160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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ABC Raises Fees Defers Reporting Actions

first_imgAs previously reported by Folio: sister pub Audience Development, the new Publisher’s Statement requires publishers to report the number of unique browsers or devices accessing their digital magazines, as well as total visits and average visit duration. The reports will also call for greater detail on print and digital magazine subscriptions and single-copy sales.“This looks at the Web, apps and things like that as well as more frequent reporting of online metrics,” he says. “As the board discussed it more, they recognized how complex some of the issues are and opted to essentially defer implementing some of these things for at least a few more months until there’s a chance for some of the groups to look at things more closely and gain a little more consensus within the industry.”Determining how best to track and measure digital publications, not just on the subscription sales side but on the engagement side as well when it comes to how individuals are reading digital editions sits at the core of the deferment.“The publishing part of our industry feels that information is not fully and widely available and that it’s probably a little too soon to have ABC audit and report that,” says Lulofs. “Publishers shared that point of view with our board, and on the other side of the table you’ve got advertisers and ad agencies that are stepping up demands for more of that information. There’s room for debate and discussion, and I think the board felt it might be premature to codify those requirements in ABC rules. There will be a broader meeting early this fall and the board and ABC will reach out to the MPA, the 4As and the ANA and get all of those groups together to talk out the issues.”ABC’s board approved a brand refresh that will fall in line with the evolving media landscape. While Lulofs couldn’t provide many specifics, he did say that the fall membership vote on the issue would help determine “if it’s still the right brand for the next phase of the organization.”The ABC board will increase audit rates and other fees by 3 percent before 2013. When asked why the group is increasing these rates, Lulofs simply pointed to timing.“It applies to all of our media divisions and it’s the first rate increase in 5 years,” he says. “We’ve been able to hold fees and costs in control for a long time during a difficult economic period.” The Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) is making strategic changes to its reporting requirements and will be raising fees by 3 percent before the end of the year.ABC’s board voted to defer implementation of a new publisher’s statement that would have expanded how consumer magazines report metrics for digital publications, and those that require larger magazines to report issue-by-issue data through ABC’s Rapid Report tool until new digital reporting requirements have been vetted further.“There were a number of announcements that came out of our March board meeting that spoke to what we call our vision task force that has been working in the magazine side of our business,” says Neal Lulofs, EVP of communications & strategic planning, GM ABC Interactive. “It has been publishers, advertisers and ad agencies and they outlined a broad vision for where we would be moving with regard to auditing and reporting, especially in the digital realm. It encompassed reporting broader digital metrics within ABC audit reports.”last_img read more

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AirAsia India Offers Oneway Ticket for ₹699

first_imgBudget carrier AirAsia’s Indian arm on Sunday launched a week-long sale offer for its entire network with one-way tickets at prices as low as ₹699, including taxes.The offer comes as part of the Malaysia-based parent company’s ‘Big Sale’ with three million promotional seats on its network from Kuala Lumpur, with the starting fare of ₹2,599 for international flights operated by AirAsia Berhad and Thai AirAsia, the airline said in a statement.AirAsia’s offer of ₹2,599 would be available on flights from Chennai, Kochi, Kolkata, Bengaluru, Tiruchirappalli and Hyderabad to Kuala Lumpur operated by AirAsia Berhad and Chennai to Bangkok flown by Thai AirAsia, the release added.AirAsia India is offering an all inclusive one-way fare starting from ₹699 for flights from Bengaluru to Chennai, Kochi, Goa, Jaipur and Chandigarh and vice versa.Tickets can be booked on Airasia’s website from Sunday night till Nov 16, for travel period from June 10 next year to Jan 17, 2016, the company said.”The ‘Big Sale’ offer would allow our guests to plan their travel early with extremely low fares,” said AirAsia India chief executive Mittu Chandilya.last_img read more

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