Tag: 浙江龙凤

CHAN 2018: CAF Cancels Kenya Inspection Visit

first_imgRelated2018 CHAN: CAF Sets New Inspection Visit Date Following Political Unrest In KenyaSeptember 7, 2017In “Africa”2018 CHAN: See Full Schedule Of CAF’s Inspection Visit To KenyaSeptember 10, 2017In “Africa”CHAN 2018: CAF To Inspect Kenya’s Readiness To Host Africa, Set Visit DateAugust 15, 2017In “Africa” The Confederation of African Football, CAF has canceled the planned facility inspection visit to Kenya ahead of the 2018 Championship for African Nations (CHAN).The decision to cancel the inspection is as a result of the current political and security situation in the country following the annulment of President Uhuru Kenyatta’s re-election by the Supreme Court of Kenya last Friday.A letter from FKF President Nick Mwendwa reads: “We have just been informed that in light of the recent happenings CAF will be sending its second Vice President Mr. Constant Omari to access the political and security situation of the country before they can proceed with the inspection visit,”The Caf inspecting delegation was scheduled to arrive Kenya for a five-day visit of facilities on 7th September and depart the East African country on 12th September 2017, ahead of the January-February 2018 CHAN.A new inspection date will be announced after CAF’s second Vice President visit the country on Sunday evening.The 2018 CHAN would take place in Kenya From January 11 to February 2.last_img read more

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SESs Astra 5B satellite which was built by Airbu

first_imgSES’s Astra 5B satellite, which was built by Airbus Defence and Space, is due to launch on board an Ariane 5 launcher on Friday March 21.The delayed 5B is the first of six Airbus telecommunications satellites that are due to launch in 2014, according to the firm.SES said that the satellite will be launched into space from the European Space Centre in French Guiana on board an Ariane 5 ECA rocket between 19:05 pm and 20:02 pm local time.Astra 5B will be deployed at 31.5° East and will provide transponder capacity in Ku and Ka bands. Its reach will be over Eastern European and neighbouring markets for DTH, direct-to-cable and feeding to digital terrestrial television networks.Astra 5B will be the eighth Airbus Defence and Space-built Eurostar E3000 satellite in the SES fleet to be placed in orbit, following the recent launches of ASTRA 2E in September 2013, SES-6 in June 2013 and ASTRA 2F in September 2012.last_img read more

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Thomas Helbo Swedish cable operator Com Hem has na

first_imgThomas HelboSwedish cable operator Com Hem has named Thomas Helbo as its new chief technology officer. Helbo was previously CTO of Danish operator Stofa and serves as chairman of the Danish Consumer Electronics Association.Com Hem’s previous technology chief, Henri Caddeo, was in December named as the new CTO of Bonnier Broadcasting, the restructured umbrella company for TV4 Group, pay TV unit C More and newspaper Nyhetsbolaget.“We are continuing to maintain a high pace of technological development in our services. I am therefore pleased that Thomas will be joining us here at Com Hem. Thomas is a highly skilled leader and has in-depth and vast experience of technological development in our industry,” said Anders Nilsson, CEO of Com Hem.“I have been part of the transformation of Stofa from a technology-oriented company to becoming more customer focused. In many ways, this is similar to the journey taken in recent years by Com Hem, which has also invested in its network and its services to enhance the customer experience. I look forward to being part of the team and to continuing efforts to realize the vision of having Sweden’s most satisfied customers,” said Helbo.last_img read more

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Vivendi and Mediaset now appear destined to face e

first_imgVivendi and Mediaset now appear destined to face each other in court after the pair failed to come to an agreement to end their long-running dispute, according to Italian press reports.The first hearing of the case is set to take place next Tuesday. Mediaset and parent company Fininvest are claiming €3 billion in damages following Vivendi’s decision in 2016 to pull out of a deal by which it would have taken control of the Italian broadcaster’s struggling pay TV arm and gained a minority stake in Mediaset itself.The latest twist in the long-running Vivendi-Mediaset saga follows the failure of Vivendi-backed Telecom Italia shareholders to agree a plan to create a joint venture with Vivendi’s pay TV arm Canal+ in January. Failure to reach an agreement with shareholders set back plans to create the JV, which would have acquired and produced content in the Italian market that would have been distributed via Telecom Italia’s TV platform.Telecom Italia’s board had earlier approved plans to strike a deal with Mediaset to bring the latter’s linear channels, movies, TV series and sports news content to its platform. Vivendi had reportedly hoped that the Canal+/Telecom Italia JV, which the telco would have held a 60% stake, would serve as a vehicle to acquire Mediaset’s content, paving the way for a deal between the pair and an end to the dispute.According to press reports in January, the management of Vivendi, Telecom Italia and Mediaset also mulled an expansion of the JV plan to bring the Italian broadcaster in as a minority shareholder, with Mediaset and Canal+ taking a 20% stake each and Telecom Italia committing to acquire €460 million of Mediaset contet over a six year agreement.With those plans now stalled, the only remaining chance of avoiding court is a last-minute attempt at arbitration due to take place in Milan on Monday.Both Vivendi and Telecom Italia are under pressure on multiple fronts.Italian regulator AGCOM is demanding a realisation of Vivendi’s commitment to set out a plan to freeze and dispose of the stake in Mediaset it acquired at the end of 2016 in a series of moves strongly opposed by the Italian media group.Separately, Italian financial investigators meanwhile have raided Telecom Italia’s offices over allegations that the tleco has engaged in anti-competitive behaviour related to its fixed access network – allegations that the telco strongly denies.last_img read more

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New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage study shows

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 16 2019Every summer, a “dead zone” forms in the Gulf of Mexico. Plumes of oxygen-robbing algae, fed by excess nitrogen coming in from the Mississippi River, kill off marine life and threaten the livelihoods of those who fish the Gulf. States bordering the Mississippi River are putting strategies in place to limit nitrogen from wastewater treatment plants, surface runoff, and agricultural fields. In a new study, University of Illinois scientists have estimated that a new conservation practice known as saturated buffers could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage by 5 to 10 percent.”It might not sound like much, given that agricultural drainage only represents a portion of the nitrogen getting into the Mississippi. But 5 to 10 percent is pretty good for an inexpensive, passive system that farmers can put in and forget about,” says Reid Christianson, research assistant professor in the Department of Crop Sciences at U of I and co-author of the study, published in Agricultural and Environmental Letters.Saturated buffers are vegetated strips of land – as little as 30 feet across – between tile-drained agricultural fields and waterways. Ordinarily, tile pipes carrying drainage water from the fields empty directly into ditches or streams. With a saturated buffer, the water is re-routed to a perforated pipe running below the surface and parallel to the stream. Water then flows through the soil of the saturated buffer into the stream. Along the way, soil microbes naturally remove up to 44 percent of the nitrogen.”Saturated buffers don’t take a lot of land out of production, and are fairly inexpensive at $3,000 to $4,000 to treat drainage from a field-sized area (roughly 30 to 80 acres). Farmers have to be willing to not farm right up to the creek, but in terms of edge-of-field conservation practices, I think saturated buffers fit easily with farming and provide additional benefits like wildlife and pollinator habitat,” says Laura Christianson, assistant professor also in the crop sciences department and co-author of the study.Related StoriesPM2.5 exposure before and after birth associated with reduction in fundamental cognitive abilitiesExposure to particulate matter can cause birth defects and fatalities during pregnancyResearchers explore connection between sense of smell, pollution and neurological diseaseTo arrive at their nitrogen reduction estimate, the Christiansons and doctoral student Janith Chandrasoma looked at publicly available digital maps of crop, soil, and stream types to estimate the total number of saturated buffers that could be installed across the Midwest: 248,000 to 360,000, which could treat up to 9.5 million acres of drained land. With other studies showing average nitrogen removal rates between 23 and 44 percent, this number of saturated buffers would reduce the total nitrogen load in agricultural drainage by 5 to 10 percent.Laura says the approach required a lot of assumptions. For example, there are no satellite images or maps for tile drainage systems across the entire Midwest, so the researchers made the assumption that corn or soybeans fields on soil characterized as “poorly drained” were most likely tiled. However, Reid notes tile drainage systems are installed under many corn and soybean fields in the Midwest, not just poorly drained ones.”Overall, our assumptions were relatively conservative. We probably underestimated our figures as a result,” he says.Saturated buffers are a new conservation practice, with the first Natural Resources Conservation Service standard published in 2016. So far, they have not been adopted on anywhere near the scale shown possible in the Christiansons’ study. For example, Laura estimates there are probably fewer than 50 saturated buffers currently operating across the entire Midwest region.”Adoption on the scale we estimated in the paper is likely a long way off,” she says, “but anything we can do to reduce nitrogen flowing to the Gulf, especially if it fits relatively easily with current on-farm management practices, warrants attention.” Source:http://aces.illinois.edu/last_img read more

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Study Brain cells involved in memory play key role in reducing future

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 18 2019Brain cells involved in memory play an important role after a meal in reducing future eating behavior, a finding that could be key in understanding and fighting obesity, according to a study led by Georgia State University.The study suggests neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region that is vital for personal memories, inhibit future eating behavior by consolidating the memory of the preceding meal. The findings are published in the journal eNeuro.Two-thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and overeating is a major cause of this epidemic.”Memories of recently eaten foods can serve as a powerful mechanism for controlling eating behavior because they provide you with a record of your recent intake that likely outlasts most of the hormonal and brain signals generated by your meal,” said Dr. Marise Parent, associate director of the Neuroscience Institute and professor of neuroscience and psychology at Georgia State. “But surprisingly, the brain regions that allow memory to control future eating behavior are largely unknown.”Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaHippocampal cells receive signals about hunger status and are connected to other brain areas that are important for starting and stopping eating. The researchers set out to determine if disrupting hippocampal function after a meal is eaten, when the memory of the meal is being stabilized, could promote eating later when these cells are functioning normally.They tested this prediction using an advanced method called optogenetics that uses light to control individual cells. Using this technique to inhibit hippocampal cells after rats ate a meal caused the animals to eat their next meal sooner and caused them to eat almost twice as much food during that next meal, even though the cells were no longer inhibited while the animals ate their next meal. This effect was observed regardless of whether the rats were offered rodent chow, a sugar solution or water sweetened with saccharin.The researchers found it interesting that rats would eat more saccharin after they interfered with their hippocampal function because this noncaloric sweetener produces very few gastrointestinal chemical signals generated by food. They concluded the effect they saw was most likely explained by an effect on memory consolidation, rather than by an impaired ability to process gastrointestinal messages.The findings have significant implications for understanding the causes of obesity and the ways to treat it. This research supports the idea that techniques that promote hippocampal-dependent memories of what, when and how much one eats could prove to be promising strategies for reducing eating and promoting weight loss. Source:https://news.gsu.edu/2019/01/17/researchers-identify-brain-cells-likely-involved-in-memories-of-eating-that-influence-next-meal/?utm_source=press-release&utm_medium=media&utm_campaign=eatinglast_img read more

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Lower heart rate variability linked to autonomic manifestations of stress in newborns

first_img Source:https://childrensnational.org/ They correlated the relationship between heart rate variability for 68 infants during at least one of these time periods with the stress z-score from the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale. The scale is a standardized assessment of newborn’s neurobehavioral integrity. The stress summary score indicates a newborn’s overall stress response, and six test items specifically relate to autonomic function.”Alpha exponent and root mean square in short timescales, root mean square in long timescales, as well as low and high frequency powers positively correlated with stress scores and, even after adjusting for covariates, remained independently associated at 24 hours,” says Allie Townsend, the study’s lead author.Pediatric Academic Societies 2019 Annual Meeting presentation”Heart rate variability (HRV) measures of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function relates to neonatal neurobehavioral manifestations of stress in newborn with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).” Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 27 2019In newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), lower heart rate variability correlates with autonomic manifestations of stress shortly after birth, underscoring the value of this biomarker, according to Children’s research presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2019 Annual Meeting.Tethered to an array of machines that keep their bodies nourished, warm and alive, newborns with health issues can’t speak. But Children’s research teams are tapping into what the machinery itself says, looking for insights into which vulnerable infants are most in need of earlier intervention.”Heart rate variability – or the variation between heartbeats – is a sign of health. Our autonomic nervous system constantly sends signals to adjust our heart rate under normal conditions. We can measure heart rate variability non-invasively, providing a way to detect potential problems with the autonomic nervous system as a sensitive marker of health in critically ill newborns,” says An N. Massaro, M.D., co-Director of Research for the Division of Neonatology at Children’s National, and the study’s senior author. “We’re looking for validated markers of brain injury in babies with HIE, and our study helps to support heart rate variability as one such valuable physiological biomarker.”In most newborns, the autonomic nervous system reliably and automatically receives information about the body and the outside world and, in response, controls essential functions like blood pressure, body temperature, how quickly the baby breathes and how rapidly the newborn’s heart beats. The sympathetic part stimulates body processes, while the parasympathetic part inhibits body processes. When the nervous system’s internal auto-pilot falters, babies can suffer.The Children’s team enrolled infants with HIE in the prospective, observational study. (HIE is brain damage that occurs with full-term babies who experience insufficient blood and oxygen flow to the brain around the time they are born.) Fifteen percent had severe encephalopathy. Mean age of babies in the observational study was 38.9 weeks gestation. Their median Apgar score at five minutes was 3; the 0-9 Apgar range indicates how ready newborns are for the rigors of life outside the womb.Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart diseaseThe team analyzed heart rate variability metrics for three time periods:center_img The first 24 to 27 hours of life The first three hours after babies undergoing therapeutic cooling were rewarmed and The first three hours after babies’ body temperature had returned to normal.last_img read more

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Discovery may lead to the development of early warning system for seizures

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 10 2019A new study has found a pattern of molecules that appear in the blood before a seizure happens. This discovery may lead to the development of an early warning system, which would enable people with epilepsy to know when they are at risk of having a seizure.Researchers at FutureNeuro, the SFI Research Centre for Chronic and Rare Neurological Diseases, hosted at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) led the study, which is published in the current edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI).FutureNeuro and RCSI researchers have discovered molecules in the blood that are higher in people with epilepsy before a seizure happens. These molecules are fragments of transfer RNAs (tRNAs), a chemical closely related to DNA that performs an important role in building proteins within the cell. When cells are stressed, tRNAs are cut into fragments. Higher levels of the fragments in the blood could reflect that brain cells are under stress in the build up to a seizure event.Using blood samples from people with epilepsy at the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and in a similar specialist centre in Marburg, Germany, the group found that fragment levels of three tRNAs “spike” in the blood many hours before a seizure. People with epilepsy often report that one of the most difficult aspects of living with the disease is never knowing when a seizure will occur.The results of this study are very promising. We hope that our tRNA research will be a key first step toward developing an early warning system.”Dr Marion Hogg, FutureNeuro investigator, Honorary Lecturer at RCSI, and the study’s lead author Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyApproximately 40,000 people in Ireland have epilepsy and one third of those do not respond to current treatments, meaning they continue to experience seizures. The World Health Organisation estimates that more than 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy.”New technologies to remove the unpredictability of uncontrolled seizures for people with epilepsy are a very real possibility,” said Professor David Henshall, Director of FutureNeuro and Professor of Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience at RCSI who was a co-author on the paper.”Building on this research we in FutureNeuro hope to develop a test prototype, similar to a blood sugar monitor that can potentially predict when a seizure might occur.”Source:RCSIJournal reference:Hogg, M.C. et al. (2019) Elevation in plasma tRNA fragments precede seizures in human epilepsy. Journal of Clinical Investigation. doi.org/10.1172/JCI126346.last_img read more

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Diabetes drug can halve the risk of late miscarriage preterm births for

first_imgIn pregnant women with PCOS, treatment with metformin from the end of the first trimester may reduce the risk of late miscarriages and preterm births.”  Professor Eszter Vanky Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Metformin can halve the risk of late miscarriage and preterm births for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).PCOS occurs in 10 to 15 per cent of all women. The symptoms are irregular menstrual periods, increased levels of male sex hormones and small ovarian blisters. In addition, many women with PCOS are overweight. Women with PCOS also have an increased incidence of impaired fertility, miscarriages, gestational diabetes, premature births and pre-eclampsia. Professor Vanky leads the research group “Women’s Health – PCOS” at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)’s Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine. An article in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal presents the results of nearly two decades of research from NTNU and St. Olavs hospital. Consultant Tone S. Løvvik is the first author, and the study is part of her doctoral work. Professor Sven M. Carlsen is co-supervisor.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplant’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesHowever, the research group surprisingly found no reduction of gestational diabetes among this cohort of women with PCOS.Examined 800 womenFrom 2000 to 2017, the research group carried out three controlled studies of nearly 800 pregnant women with PCOS. The studies were conducted at 15 hospitals in Norway, 4 hospitals in Sweden and one in Iceland. Half of the women were given metformin (2000 milligrams daily) from first trimester to delivery. The rest of the women were given a placebo.In addition to a lower risk of late miscarriage and preterm births, the researchers also found that the women who received metformin gained less weight during pregnancy.A higher level of male sex hormones is associated with several of the symptoms of PCOS. The causes of the condition are not known, but may be related to lifestyle, inheritance and intrauterine fetal life.The group found no effect on pre-eclampsia, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure or to what extent newborns of women with PCOS needed intensive care.No effect on diabetes”Perhaps the most remarkable finding was that metformin had no effect whatsoever on either the incidence or severity of gestational diabetes,” Vanky notes.Metformin is a well-known drug used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and in some countries regarded as equivalent to insulin as a first-line drug therapy for gestational diabetes.The three studies that form the basis of the conclusion were carried out according to Good Clinical Practice principles and will have an impact on the follow-up and treatment of pregnant women with PCOS and likely also of other pregnant women.Another part of the study followed up children of mothers with PCOS who used metformin, and a control group that was given a placebo. Source:The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)Journal reference:Løvvik, T.S. et al. (2019) Use of metformin to treat pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PregMet2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(19)30002-6.last_img read more

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With Uber Eats fast growth comes potential for profit

first_img Uber Eats has grown into Texas’ most-used food delivery app In three years, the Uber Eats restaurant food delivery service has grown from an experiment to serving much of the U.S. and major cities worldwide. This undated photo provided by Uber Inc. Technologies shows Jason Droege, an Uber vice president who leads Uber Everything, the unit that explores how to build new businesses off the Uber network. Droege says Uber Eats is growing as fast as the ride-hailing service did in its early days. (Uber Inc. Technologies via AP) Citation: With Uber Eats’ fast growth comes potential for profit (2018, November 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-uber-fast-growth-potential-profit.html Explore furthercenter_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. By year’s end, the ride-hailing company says it will cover 70 percent of the U.S. population and be in 243 metro areas, mainly by expanding into smaller cities. It’s already in over 300 cities in 36 countries with many international deliveries done by bicycle.Jason Droege, an Uber vice president who leads Uber Everything, the unit that explores how to build new businesses off the Uber network, says Eats is growing as fast as the ride-hailing service did in its early days. He talks about the future of the service and demand for getting food delivered to your home. Questions and answers have been edited for length and clarity.Q: Is there a particular demographic group that uses Uber Eats?A: Certainly younger generations use it more. It’s more like how they eat. I think there’s a convenience premium for people who are coming of age now versus people who already have their habits set. If you look back, fast casual was something that was just getting going when I was 10, 11 years old. My generation is very used to going to a restaurant and doing take out, versus maybe the previous generation might have been used to ‘hey, let’s go get groceries.’ Take out has been on the rise ever since the mid- to late-80s. Now you have a generation who wants the additional convenience. Maybe they want to stay home and watch Netflix, or use social media, or they want the access to hundreds of restaurants.Q: What kind of range do you serve from a customer’s home?A: We want to make sure that the food arrives hot and delicious. If the food is in the car too long, that’s bad. It’s more about the time than it is about the business because we want that experience to be high quality. Uber has always believed that the faster you can get your ride, or your food, changes how consumers think about the level of convenience. So we’ve been focused from the beginning on getting food delivery from 40 to 45 minutes (from the order time) down to, I think our global average is now 31 minutes. Usually when people are ordering they’re hungry. So we see that people use the product more when it’s delivered faster, so we focus a lot on speed.Q: How did you know that people would want more than pizza delivered to their home, was it testing?A: Sometimes we do tests and they work, sometimes we do tests and they didn’t work. Uber historically has done stunts. Uber ice cream, where we delivered ice cream on demand for a few years, or there was Uber puppies and Uber kittens, where a car would roll up and you’d play with some kittens in the back. We did those actually very locally. One common thread you saw is when a city, like the city of Fresno put on the local barbecue spot that was hard to get to, had really long lines, you saw a lot of demand. From the early days, we noticed that when we put popular restaurants on Uber and delivered them on demand, those are some of our most consistently successful stunts. Even in our marketing promotions we saw food and Uber had some connectivity. So we had some signal, but experimentation is what really pushed us there.Q: Is Eats a profit-making entity?A: We’re focused on growth now, so we’re investing aggressively. We feel really good about the economics of the business. Before we went into expansion, we actually got to a point where we saw the path to profitability, which is why we decided to invest aggressively. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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