Nigel Clough named new Burton Albion manager

first_img Nigel Clough has returned to take charge of Burton Albion 1 Burton have announced the appointment of Nigel Clough as their new manager.The 49-year-old’s return to the Pirelli Stadium had been anticipated after Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink’s departure to Queens Park Rangers on Friday.Clough first took the reins at Burton as player-manager aged 32 in October 1998 and went on to become their longest serving manager.He left a little over ten years later for Derby County, with the Brewers well on course to attain promotion from the Conference.Burton are currently top of the League One standings by two points after 20 games.Chairman Ben Robinson said: “We have enjoyed a great start to the season under Jimmy and his assistant David Oldfield and Nigel Clough is the ideal man to continue that work.“He has a tremendous track record in football as both a player and a manager and during a 10-year spell at Eton Park, and then the Pirelli Stadium, has already shown his tremendous passion and commitment for Burton Albion.“We are delighted to welcome him back.”Clough was in charge of Derby for nearly five years before being sacked after a poor start to the 2013-14 season.He took over at Sheffield United less than a month after his departure from the Rams, but parted company with the Blades after they were beaten in last season’s League One play-off semi-finals by Swindon.Clough had been linked with the vacant position at League One rivals Chesterfield but he is delighted to make his return to Burton.He said: “It’s wonderful to be back at Burton Albion again, working with the chairman Ben Robinson and his staff, who make this club so special.“We’re looking forward to trying to maintain the remarkable success the club is enjoying.”last_img read more

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Chris Berman on Jon Gruden, how the 49ers adopted the ‘Swami’ and his upcoming Bay Area honor

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Though he was born in Connecticut, broadcaster Chris Berman somehow had a Bay Area native for an inner child. Berman gravitated to the Giants as a kid, choosing Willie Mays as his favorite player in 1963 after his father instructed him to keep his eyes on the do-everything centerfielder.In 1981, before either Joe Montana or ESPN were household names, the 26-year-old anchor with a window-rattling voice hosted the 2:30 a.m. ET SportsCenter. That was the year Berman donned a …last_img

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Noah’s Ark on Mars

first_imgWe apologize for this improbable headline to draw attention to two stories making the rounds: new claims about Noah’s Ark on Mt. Ararat, and new claims about life on Mars.  Headlines on these topics show up periodically in the news.  What do the subjects have in common?  How do they differ?  Do the most recent instances affirm tradition or break new ground?    Claims about Noah’s Ark are usually made – though not exclusively – by some Bible-believing Christians (also some Muslims and Jews), while claims about life on Mars are typically made (though again, not exclusively) by some evolutionists.  There is nothing about the Biblical story of Noah that prevents an unbeliever from being interested in claims about a boat on Ararat, and there is nothing that prevents a Christian from accepting the possibility of life on Mars.  Nevertheless, advocates are generally divided along those ideological lines, and critics equally divided along the opposing lines: evolutionists are often boisterous in their ridicule of “Arkeologists” (while some Christians are, too), while Bible-believers often ignore or sneer at claims about life in outer space (while some evolutionists do, too).    The latest Ark claim burst onto the scene April 25 with a press conference and a website (noahsarksearch.net) showing detailed pictures and video of a wood structure allegedly found inside a cave high on Mt. Ararat in Turkey.  It seemed too good to be true.  Instead of the usual vague shapes of rock that might resemble a ship from some angles, here was unmistakable artificially-manipulated timber shaped into rooms and structures found above timberline.  Unless the eyewitnesses were all liars, it seemed straightforward.  One of them said he was 99.9% sure it was Noah’s Ark.  Some creation organizations snatched up the tantalizing news with cautious optimism; others, having been burned in the past, seemed to adopt a wait-and-see attitude.  CMI put out a short press release with daily updates, but expressed the “need for caution—in both directions….”  The story made Fox News, ABC News and other leading news organizations.  Skeptics like those at the James Randi Foundation were quick to moan “not again!” with dismissive vituperation against what they perceive as Christian gullibility.  Alan Boyle in his Cosmic Log at MSNBC positioned the claim in the tradition of reports that surface occasionally, remarking that “a boatload of skepticism is in order.”  Then on April 27 a letter from Dr. Randall Price surfaced.  He is a Biblical archaeologist and member of a rival search team.  His letter, reproduced at Bible Places Blog, claims that the site is a cleverly-devised hoax.  The timbers were hauled up there from the Black Sea, he claims, by Turks who misled the Chinese into thinking they were the remains of Noah’s boat.  Nevertheless, that claim does not answer all the questions.  Some diehards are questioning Price’s motives, because he lost money on the deal and may not be impartial because he has his own search going on.  They also doubted his first-hand knowledge of details mentioned in the letter.  Subsequent to Price’s hoax allegation, World Net Daily posted a lengthy article sharing some of the diversity of opinions about the claim, and so did the Christian Science Monitor.  The rest of this story is TBD.Update 12/07/2010: Randall Price was interviewed by CBN and claims he has proof it is a hoax by a disreputable guide who misled the Chinese team.  But he also claims his own team has found a rectangular anomaly under the ice with ground-penetrating radar, and hopes to excavate it next summer.  Video at World of the Bible.    What’s lively on Mars?  News about Martian microbes tends to come around more frequently than Noah’s Ark reports.  This month has been no exception.  In a way kind of mirroring the Chinese Ark story, there was a short-lived headline that NASA had new evidence of life on Mars posted by The Sun, a British tabloid, which NASA quickly denied as “positively false” according to Clara Moskowitz on Space.com.  More serious sources kept hope alive, though.  New Scientist updated notions with optimism: “Life on Mars, if it ever existed, may be easier to find than previously thought,” an article said, announcing that common Mars rocks can preserve life after all.  “New research on terrestrial rocks suggests that a type of rock common on Mars can preserve fossilised microbial life, rather than erasing evidence of it as previously thought.”  But that’s only a possibility, not a discovery.  The possibilities for unique Martian life were dimmed somewhat by PhysOrg’s report from the American Society for Microbiology that “Earth microbes may contaminate the search for life on Mars.”  This is another in the “too late” category: our landers may have already contaminated the Red Planet with our own germs.  (In a sense, then, if Earth were destroyed, Mars could be a kind of Ark preserving at least some organisms; but that’s hardly a justification for the tabloid headline to this entry.)  James Urquhard announced a headline on New Scientist sure to give fodder to cartoonists: “Look for Mars life with laughing gas.”  Scientists at the University of Georgia think that nitrous oxide could provide an atmospheric biomarker for future missions hunting Martians: “This could be an easy way to ‘sniff’ around the surface of Mars looking for pockets of sub-surface brine that might be hotspots for extreme microbial life.”  It goes without saying that the relatively new science of “astrobiology” has ambitions beyond Mars.  Europa, Titan, and Enceladus are all hot targets, and the sky’s the limit: millions of dollars have been spent on missions like Kepler, the Space Interferometry Mission, Terrestrial Planet Finder and other stepping stones to the discovery of life among the stars.  And then there’s SETI: privately funded, but just as eager to find an unseen, hoped-for reality.    Two hunting parties: Arkeologists and Astrobiologists.  Both get excited over each tantalizing hint of success.  Both have outspoken critics.  Both have yet to find definitive proof of their reason for being.  Both are convinced that proof would clobber their critics with the superiority of their theological or philosophical views.  One can only wonder what would happen if Noah’s Ark and life on Mars were found simultaneously.  At least it would be a good day for sociologists.This comparison and contrast is not meant to depict the two camps as equal and opposite, nor the implications of each belief system as equally credible and equally ridiculous, or any such thing.  For goodness’ sake, look at the asymmetry in funding!  Astrobiology gets millions of dollars from the federal government and is supported by the major universities, whereas Ark researchers struggle with private donations on a thankless and difficult search in a remote, politically-dangerous part of the world.  Ark research is tangible and potentially falsifiable.  The mountain is finite.  Disproving astrobiology would amount to disproving a universal negative.  The Flood may be ridiculous to certain anti-Christian rationalist skeptics (you know, the ones with the Enlightenment baseball caps who act skeptical of everything but their own skepticism – about that, they are certain).  These people love to yuck it up over the credulous Christians falling for the latest Noah’s Ark hoax.  Out come the clippings of Jammal and all the rest to parade before the press again.  They never seem to recognize their own credulity when it comes to the Mars meteorite and every whiff of methane or laughing gas that is detected that might suggest the remotest possibility, against astronomical odds, that life could have “emerged” there by unintelligent causes.  Recently one of their heroes, Stephen Hawking, proposed that life might exist in the interior of stars (see Rob Sheldon blog).  Did any of them blush at that?  Let them tell us on what scientific observations such a preposterous suggestion could possibly be based.  It’s beyond the credibility of even science fiction.  It sounds like something a drunk Smogarian would say after staring at a lava lamp.  Let them laugh at Christians who believe in the Flood account all they want; they are laughing in the face of Jesus Christ, who mentioned the story of Noah as if it were a fact of history (Matthew 24:38-39).  And they had better not forget that millions of smart Christians and scientists in the intelligent design community, find evolutionists’ astrobiological beliefs even more ridiculous.  Life by chance?  in primordial soup?  You’ve got to be kidding.  So Dykstra’s Law holds: everybody is somebody else’s weirdo.  Understood?  Come, let us reason together.  (Just remember that by reasoning you are partaking of Judeo-Christian assumptions, so park your naturalism at the door if you want in.)    First, what would extraterrestrial life imply?  This has been discussed for centuries by Christians and skeptics alike.  It is not a new question.  No Christian philosopher is biting his fingernails worrying about the day when life on Mars or some exoplanet is found, as if it will disprove the Bible or make theology irrelevant.  One cannot say extraterrestrial life will prove the naturalistic origin of life without begging the question.  It could have been created.  There is a very rich history of discussion about this very question we cannot possibly do justice to here; suffice it to say there is a diversity of opinions about the implications of extraterrestrial life, because the Bible is silent about the question.  It would be an interesting discovery; it would not be a damaging discovery for Christianity.  The absence of life anywhere but on Earth, however, would be very difficult for naturalists to explain.  It would make life unique to Earth.  Their only appeal would be the Stuff Happens Law: the anti-scientific cop-out.    As for the possibility of finding the Ark, even for those who accept the Biblical story there are reasons to doubt it was preserved.  For one thing, the Bible is vague about the location: all it says is that the Ark came to rest in the mountains of Ararat (plural).  One has to ascertain if the original language refers to the same region, let alone the same mountain.  Would the Ark have come to rest near the summit of such a peak?  The modern Mt. Ararat has also been subject to violent earthquakes and landslides.  Its extreme environment makes it hard to believe a wooden structure would survive for thousands of years.  The descendents of Noah might have needed to strip it for materials in the first years after the Flood.  Why should anything remain?    Nevertheless, persistent eyewitness reports, some of them credible by reasonable standards, and a long history of written reports from antiquity, have not let hopes die.  They keep hardy individuals willing to invest and climb and search in hopes of locating the biggest archaeological artifact of all time.  One cannot blame them for trying.  What’s the harm?  The harm is only when there are hoaxes and frauds, but many of the searchers are honest men and women who really want to follow the evidence and know the truth.  The self-seeking frauds are usually found out in due time.  They give the honest ones a bad name.  A certain level of enthusiasm and readiness to hope the latest claim is real is to be expected; it keeps hope alive in a difficult and often thankless enterprise.  If rationalist skeptics are going to laugh out loud at Arkeologists, they need to laugh out loud at themselves every time they jump to conclusions about life in outer space.    Regarding this latest claim by the Chinese, the story is still developing; for now, we are going to treat it as “interesting, worth investigating further, but probably not Ark-related till proven otherwise.”  The pictures were certainly eye-popping.  If these really were taken at 14,000 feet up that mountain, something large and artificial got there somehow, and if the timbers were trucked up there from the Black Sea by hoaxsters like Randall Price claims, that’s quite a trick.  It could have been done with enough money and motivation.  The Chinese team appears too credulous, too eager to link this with Noah, and not careful enough with their documentation and scientific measurements.  There are too many questions.  The burden of proof is high.  We do not need another fraud or disappointment paraded in the news.  Without an independent investigation done rigorously, and with claims of fraud coming from a plausible (albeit not disinterested) source, no one should trust the claims at this time.    We’re all believers in something.  We all need a healthy skepticism, too.  The Apostle Paul gave advice skeptics and believers alike should be able to agree on, whether looking for life on Mars or a boat on a mountain: “Test all things; hold fast what is good” (I Thessalonians 5:21).Footnote to Christians:  Would proof of Noah’s Ark convince skeptics?  Consider that Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, out in the open, in front of multiple eyewitnesses, after Lazarus had been dead and in the tomb for four days.  Evidence doesn’t get much better than that.  His highly-educated enemies could not deny it – and did not try to.  What was their response?  When they saw throngs of people following Jesus because of what he had done, their rational, calm, reasoned, enlightened response in view of overpowering physical evidence was not only to plot to kill Jesus, but to kill Lazarus, too (John 11-12:9).  This was after they had already interrogated the man born blind Jesus had healed, and his parents, but refused to believe.  Evidence separated the truth-seekers from the pseudo-truth-seekers.    What is the value of evidence for Christians?  Some have responded to this latest Noah’s Ark story that they don’t need archaeological evidence like Noah’s Ark; they believe the Bible by faith.  OK, well, define faith.  That sentiment is a half-truth.  Faith had better be based on something or else it is an irrational leap in the dark, not faith.  The Bible portrays faith as a leap out of darkness into the light.  True faith should step in the direction the evidence is pointing.  After all, the Bible itself is archaeological evidence – an inscription from the past.  On what basis do you believe it?  Hopefully, because you know it can be corroborated by both internal and external evidence, in addition to its impact on your own heart.  The discovery of Noah’s Ark would be one particularly powerful instance of many correspondences of the Biblical record to extra-biblical history, but no one item like Noah’s Ark should be treated like a prop on which one’s faith depends.  It is the preponderance of evidence from multiple, independent avenues that gives a Christian confidence to trust God’s word.  One can hope that real truth-seekers would also be impressed by such a discovery were it to be confirmed, and would be moved to trust in God also.  Regarding the pseudo-truth-seekers: well, without repentance, no amount of evidence will change a stubborn, rebellious heart (2 Peter 3).  You will know them by their fruits.(Visited 171 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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World Cup semi-final against India was fixed, says former Pak cricketer Haider

first_imgAllegations of match fixing have once again clouded the Pakistani cricket team after former wicketkeeper Zulqarnain Haider, who had fled to London alleging he had been threatened by bookies, demanded a formal probe into the team’s defeat to India in the ICC World Cup semi-final.Saying he was not surprised by Pakistan’s poor performance and defeat in Mohali on Wednesday, Haider questioned poor performances by several players including wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal. He alleged that fixing has been part of the Pakistani cricket culture.He accused the Akmal brothers of controlling the way the national team functions and alleged that they did not allow any player to settle down in the team.Speaking to Pakistani channel Dunya News from London, Haider said he had run away from the team hotel in Dubai after being harassed by Kamran’s younger brother Umar Akmal. Haider questioned why Kamran was still in the Pakistani team despite dropping a number of catches.Haider had fled from the hotel in Dubai, where the Pakistani team was staying, alleging threat from a fixer in November 2010.He alleged that some national selectors took money from players to select them. He urged the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB), government and the International Cricket Council (ICC) to look into the assets of the selectors to get to the bottom of the truth.last_img read more

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World Cup role reversal as Germany wins, Croatia struggles

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Facing old rivals the Netherlands for the third time in six months, Germany enjoyed its revenge.The Dutch beat Germany 3-0 in Amsterdam in October and earned a last-gasp draw in the return fixture. Those results helped to relegate Germany from the top tier of the Nations League — further embarrassment after its disastrous 2018 World Cup campaign when it failed to advance from the group stage.Schulz’s winner came just when it looked like his team had let the Dutch salvage a draw from 2-0 down in the Group C game.“We didn’t control the ball and if you can’t exert pressure the game opens up and you see that they have some amazing attackers,” Netherlands coach Ronald Koeman said.Germany had gone six competitive games without a win since beating Sweden at the World Cup.ADVERTISEMENT “It’s good for the self-belief of this young team,” said Germany coach Joachim Loew. “I can live with criticism. I know what our potential is.”Croatia looked a shadow of the resilient team which reached the World Cup final in July as it lost 2-1 to Hungary in Budapest. Spells of confusion in the Croatian defense are likely to concern coach Zlatko Dalic in a group where four teams look like contenders for two qualifying spots for Euro 2020.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsElsewhere, Wales started with a tense win over Slovakia, while Belgium and Poland enjoyed comfortable victories.GERMANY’S REVENGE Houston moves into Sweet 16 for first time in 35 years Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag HAZARD’S CENTENARYOne hundred games for Belgium and Eden Hazard is still dangerous.Hazard scored his 30th career international goal in his centenary game as Belgium beat Cyprus 2-0 to tighten its grip on Group I. Michy Batshuayi finished with a goal and an assist as Belgium eased to a routine win to stay top of the group with six points.Valencia winger Denis Cheryshev scored two goals and set up another as Russia bounced back from its opening loss to Belgium on Thursday with a 4-0 dismantling of Kazakhstan.Still mourning last week’s loss to Kazakhstan, Scotland fans had little to celebrate as their team struggled to a 2-0 win over San Marino, the world’s lowest-ranked team. Scotland, which hasn’t qualified for a European Championship since 1996, is still guaranteed a playoff spot thanks to Nations League results.POLAND WINS AGAINPoland took control of Group G with a second straight win, beating Latvia 2-0, while Austria’s qualifying hopes are already looking in doubt.Latvia’s goalkeeper Pavels Steinbors made a string of spectacular saves before Robert Lewandowski broke the deadlock in the 76th minute with a header. Kamil Glik scored another header eight minutes later.Austria gave up a 1-0 lead as it lost 4-2 to Israel and is level with Latvia at the bottom of the group with no points from its opening two games. Eran Zahavi scored a hat trick as Israel earned its first win over Austria for 20 years.North Macedonia is level with Israel on four points after drawing 1-1 with Slovenia. Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving View comments Google Philippines names new country director Germany’s Nico Schulz, fourth from left, celebrates with his teammates after scoring his side’s third goal during the Euro 2020 group C qualifying soccer match between Netherlands and Germany at the Johan Cruyff ArenA in Amsterdam, Sunday, March 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)Germany is winning again, and Croatia is struggling. The World Cup feels like a long time ago.After a year of problems off the field — and humiliation on it — the new Germany is finally starting to look like the old Germany. Grit, determination and Nico Schulz’s 90th-minute winner earned the Germans a confidence-boosting 3-2 win over the Netherlands on Sunday in a European Championship qualifier.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img LATEST STORIES Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting The challenge now for Loew is to keep the momentum going — after all, the win over Sweden was seen at the time as a much-needed boost after a poor run. It proved a false dawn when Germany promptly lost to South Korea and spectacularly crashed out of the World Cup.Germany’s next opponent, Belarus, lost 2-1 to group leader Northern Ireland which won its second straight group game with an 87th-minute goal from substitute Josh Magennis.CROATIA CREAKINGEight months after reaching the World Cup final, Croatia is unexpectedly struggling.Croatia’s defense was at times overwhelmed by a spirited Hungary team, conceding one goal to a fine passing move masterminded by Balazs Dzsudzsak, and the other after panicky set-piece defending.Since losing the World Cup final to France, Croatia’s results have been wildly inconsistent.A 6-0 loss to Spain in the Nations League, a 3-2 win over Spain soon after and Thursday’s labored 2-1 win over Azerbaijan have highlighted Croatia’s moments of brilliance and its vulnerabilities after losing key players to international retirement and injury.Earlier in the same group, Daniel James’ first international goal gave Wales the lead after five minutes against Slovakia before holding on to win 1-0.“It was a perfect start,” Wales coach Ryan Giggs said, and he was full of praise for the 21-year-old James. “He is a talent, and when you have got that raw pace you are a threat at any level.”Croatia, Hungary, Wales and Slovakia are level on three points in Group E. Last-placed Azerbaijan has no points. MOST READ PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

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