Tag: 老闵行油压店200

Serena Williams’ treatment resonates among Black women

first_imgWillingham isn’t a tennis star, but she is a Black woman. She and others like her say Williams’ experience resonates with them because they are often forced to watch their tone and words in the workplace in ways that men and other women are not.And if they’re not careful, they say, they risk being branded “Angry Black Woman.”“So much of what she experiences we experience in the workplace, too,” said Willingham, a professor of criminal justice at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh. “As Black women … we’re expected to stay in our lane, that lane that has been created for us. Any time we step out of that lane, then we become a problem.”The stereotype of the “Angry Black Woman” is alive and well, said Felicia Martin, 36, a federal employee who lives in Brooklyn. She recalls once seeing a white female co-worker cursing and throwing things and not facing repercussions, while she’s been told to calm down for expressing her own upset in a normal tone of voice. Martin and others pointed to a cartoon by an Australian artist as the clearest example of the stereotype facing Black women. Mark Knight of Melbourne’s Herald Sun depicted Williams as an irate, hulking, big-mouthed Black woman jumping up and down on a broken racket. The umpire was shown telling a blond, slender woman — meant to be Osaka, who is actually Japanese and Haitian — “Can you just let her win?”“I was deeply offended. This is not a joke,” said Vanessa K. De Luca, former editor in chief of Essence magazine, who wrote a column about the U.S. Open furor.The cartoonist “completely missed the point of why she was upset,” De Luca told The Associated Press. “It was about her integrity, and anybody who doesn’t get that is perpetuating the erasure that so many Black women feel when they are trying to speak up for themselves. It’s like our opinions don’t matter.”Some Black women say they have to worry perpetually about how they’re coming across to make sure they’re not dismissed as angry or emotional. In this Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, file photo, Serena Williams, right, talks with referee Brian Earley during the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, in New York. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger, File) Retired professional tennis player Zina Garrison defended tennis player Serena Williams after Williams was hit with three code violations that led to a $17,000 fine at the U.S. Open final, saying some of the chair umpire’s calls were unfair. (Sept. 10)“If I’m upset about something, I should get to express that to you,” Martin said.During Saturday’s championship loss to Naomi Osaka, Williams got a warning from the chair umpire for violating a rarely enforced rule against receiving coaching from the sidelines. An indignant Williams emphatically defended herself, denying she had cheated. A short time later, she smashed her racket in frustration and was docked a point. She protested that and demanded an apology from the umpire, who penalized her a game.Many people, Black women among them, echoed Williams’ contention that she was punished while men on the tennis circuit have gotten away with even harsher language.Serena Williams argues with the chair umpire during a match against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, during the women’s finals of the U.S. Open tennis tournament at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, in New York, on Sept. 8, 2018. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP, File)“A lot of things started going through my head in that particular situation. You know, first and foremost, what was going to be said about her the next day? The typical angry black woman, you know … when she really was just standing up for herself and she was standing up for women’s rights,” said former tennis champion Zina Garrison, who is Black. “A woman, period, is always, when we speak up for ourselves, then you have the situation where people are saying, you know, they’re too outspoken. They’re acting like a man, all of that. But then a Black woman on top of that, the angry Black woman, who does she think she is?” Serena Williams hugs Naomi Osaka, of Japan, after Osaka defeated Williams in the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) “It’s exhausting,” said Denise Daniels, 44, of the Bronx, who works in professional development for educators. “It does diminish from the work satisfaction that other people get to enjoy because it is an additional cost.”Willingham thinks that was part of Williams’ experience on Saturday as well, but that it was also about a career’s worth of frustrations that she has had to endure, such as when the French Open banned the type of catsuit she wore.“I felt it for her. I felt she was fed up, she was tired of this,” Willingham said. “How much is she supposed to take, really? How much are any of us supposed to keep taking?”___Associated Press video producer Noreen Nasir contributed to this report from Washington.___Deepti Hajela covers issues of race, ethnicity and immigration for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/dhajela. For more of her work, search for her name at https://apnews.com. NEW YORK (AP) — When Serena Williams told the umpire at the U.S. Open final that he owed her an apology, that he had stolen something from her, and then she got penalized for her words, Breea Willingham could relate to her frustration and anger.last_img read more

Read More

Racer turned adult model Renee Gracie tells Indians to ‘get off her page’

first_imgImage Courtesy: Instagram(@renee_gracie)/AlamyAdvertisement visp4NBA Finals | Brooklyn VsglzWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ebun11( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 1uw2Would you ever consider trying this?😱2rocrCan your students do this? 🌚1yzRoller skating! Powered by Firework Last week, Renee Gracie was all over the headlines. The former Australian female V8 Supercars driver, who had joined the adult film industry a couple of months ago, took to social media to share her experience in her new line of work, and gained huge popularity. However, Gracie is on the news again, but this time, the adult model is upset on her audience from India, and she has accused them for stealing her pics!Advertisement Image Courtesy: Instagram(@renee_gracie)/AlamyThe 25 year old has recently lashed out at Indians, claiming that they have been using her images and videos illegally, as she wrote in a post on her OnlyFans page.“To all you Indian a**holes on my page. Stop stealing my images,” Gracie went all out in her post.Advertisement She further alleged that her viewers from India have been using her content to create fake profiles on social media, as she continued, “They are copyrighted and I own them not you. Stop making pages of me and stop sharing my videos and images illegally,”“I don’t like Indians now. If your Indian, get off my page now! Your not welcome here anymore. I will be removing all India’s from my page tonight,” a furious Gracie concluded her post.Advertisement Gracie revealed that she has been making around $25,000 a week since she signed up for the content subscription service OnlyFans, after which she has been able to recover from financial debts much better than her Dunlop Super2 Series days.“It has put me in a financial position I could never have dreamt of and I really enjoy it. I sell those photos and people tip me,” Gracie said on a live session on Instagram. I have a 30-year housing loan that I am about to pay off in 12 months,” she added.While there have been criticisms thrown at Gracie for switching her career to adult entertainment, she said that her family has been very supportive, and she is deciding to stick to her new profession.If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comAlso read-Exclusive: CWG medalist Deepak Lather: Made it as a sprinter before weightlifting!Gary Kristen reveals how he prolonged Sachin Tendulkar’s career in the Indian team Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More