Category: hosrajcr

Why the continued fawning over former Niskayuna supervisor?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSo my faith in the American voter was restored when incumbent Joe Landry was defeated by Republican newcomer Yasmine Syed for Niskayuna town supervisor this past November. Now I read where a Donald Trump-style “love fest” was recreated at Landry’s final 2017 Niskayuna Town Board meeting and baseball fields are to be named in his honor. Hello. This isn’t about baseball or naming ball fields. This is about Niskayuna voters voting against bullying tactics directed at town employees and political candidates. I also see where board member Denise Murphy McGraw still plans on seeking Landry’s “continual counsel” after his departure. What’s that about? I suggest McGraw, as well as the other board members, get with the program as voiced by the people of Niskayuna and support the new town supervisor. If not, I hope to see the voters do the right thing on future election days.John TemplerNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over Bethlehemlast_img read more

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‘It’s necessary’: Greenpeace lauds government’s plan to tax plastics

first_imgEnvironmental watchdog Greenpeace Indonesia has applauded the government for planning to impose a levy on plastic products, describing it as an important measure to reduce the plastic waste that is damaging the environment.“Taxes are one way to constrain uncontrolled plastic consumption, as single-use and non-recyclable plastic has damaged the environment and threatens human and animal life,” Greenpeace spokesperson Muharram Atha Rasyadi said in a statement on Thursday.He added that the levy should be imposed on various kinds of plastic packages for food and beverages and other fast moving consumer goods. The government has set an ambitious target of 70 percent marine debris reduction by 2024; therefore, “real and quick efforts are necessary,” he went on to say.Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrayati has told House of Representatives Commission XI overseeing financial affairs that the government is planning to impose an excise on plastics, among other commodities.The plan would reduce plastic consumption by up to 50 percent, she said, adding that the government would receive revenue of Rp 1.6 trillion (US$116.6 million) each year. It would also force plastic producers to transform themselves into producers of environmentally friendly goods.The government has been planning to impose an excise on plastics since 2017 but has yet to receive approval from lawmakers.Indonesia has been listed as the world’s second-largest marine polluter as 15 percent of 1.3 million tons – 195,000 tons — of plastic waste ends up in rivers and oceans each year. (gis)Topics : “An excise on single-use plastic products, such as plastic bags and straws, should be prioritized,” Muharram went on to say.Such a plan would be an encouragement for industry to apply circular-economy mechanisms, which prioritize reusage and refilling activities, Greenpeace added. The circular economy is a sustainability concept that seeks to minimize waste by deploying resources optimally through reuse, recycling and remanufacturing.Read also: Indonesia revives excise plan on plastics, dirty vehicles and sweet drinks“We are at the peak of a plastic crisis, because our landfills can’t hold those kinds of waste anymore. Our rivers and seas have become trash bins for these plastic products,” said Muharram.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw Host a Roundtable to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic

first_img April 28, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Williamsport, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw were joined by Rep. Jeff Wheeland, state and local officials, law enforcement and health care professionals at the Pennsylvania College of Technology to discuss local and statewide efforts to lead the nation in combating the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic in Pennsylvania. In an effort to confront this epidemic collaboratively, Governor Wolf is conducting roundtables statewide to discuss the initiatives of his administration, the state legislature, county agencies, treatment centers, hospitals, medical schools, and to listen to local officials about the challenges they are facing.“Fighting Pennsylvania’s opioid and heroin epidemic is a top priority for my administration,” said Governor Wolf. “These roundtables are an opportunity to work collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis.”“We appreciate the opportunity to sit down with Governor Wolf today in order to increase public awareness of the heroin and opioid crisis facing our rural counties,” Sen. Yaw said.  “However, this is not just a rural issue. It’s a statewide issue.  Fortunately, we have a coalition in Lycoming County called Project Bald Eagle that is working to stem the tide of heroin and opioid abuse through education, prevention, treatment, enforcement and data monitoring.  Undoubtedly, it will take a statewide-wide effort to combat this issue and we thank the Governor for his involvement.”Governor Wolf was joined by Secretary Gary Tennis, Representative Jeff Wheeland, Lycoming County Commissioner Rick Mirabito, Williamsport Mayor Gabriel Campana, and a number of other state and local leaders and health care professionals, students, and professors. The governor lauded the efforts of these legislators and drew attention to the work of the Center for Rural PA, a bipartisan, bicameral legislative agency chaired by Senator Gene Yaw, who has been holding hearings with the Center on the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis since 2014.Beginning in 2014, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania convened a series of statewide public hearings to examine the increasing use of heroin and opioid abuse and addiction rates in rural Pennsylvania communities. The hearings were in response to questions posed by state legislators on the increasing number of arrests and overdose deaths attributed to heroin and opioid abuse within their respective legislative districts.The Wolf Administration hopes that these discussions are just the beginning of a larger conversation with both Republicans and Democrats in the House and Senate as well as local officials, law enforcement, emergency responders, and health care professionals.“I look forward to continue working collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic,” said Governor Wolf. “The magnitude of the addiction and overdose death epidemic in Pennsylvania is shocking: at least seven Pennsylvanians die every day from a drug overdose. With nearly 2,500 overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2014 and estimates that the 2015 total will be higher, a collaborative effort on the federal, state, and local levels is crucial in combating this crisis.”Some of the administration’s initiatives in the fight against heroin include: signing a statewide standing order for naloxone, making it possible for all Pennsylvanians to access this life-saving drug; equipping the Pennsylvania State Police with naloxone so that those troopers who are first on the scene of an overdose can have another tool on-hand during these emergencies; partnering with Adapt Pharma to make Narcan available to public high schools across the state at no cost; developing the ABC-MAP prescription drug monitoring program to detect and prevent prescription fraud and abuse, which contribute to addiction; and appointing a director for the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Office, who will work to ensure that the PDMP meets its goal of assisting healthcare professionals in identifying patients that would benefit from treatment.In an effort to curtail drug addiction and curb the supply of excess drugs that can be used illicitly, the Department of Health is leading an effort to build upon the opioid prescribing guidelines already created, including specialty specific guidelines for emergency department providers, dentists, obstetricians and gynecologists, and pharmacists. These guidelines give healthcare providers direction for safe and effective pain relief practices, with greater emphasis on non-opioid therapies and greater caution to prevent addiction and diversion. In addition, the DOH recently joined dozens of healthcare organizations, medical experts, and consumer advocacy groups in signing petitions requesting changes to federal pain management requirements that are believed to foster dangerous prescribing practices.DOH is also working with the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs to develop the “warm hand-off” process, whereby overdose survivors would be taken directly from the emergency department to a licensed drug treatment provider, as well as Pennsylvania’s Prescription Drug Take-Back Program. This program helps communities properly dispose of unused prescriptions at any of the 400+ police station locations across Pennsylvania. To date, approximately 40,000 pounds of prescription drugs have been taken back and destroyed.Governor Wolf’s decision to expand Medicaid eligibility in Pennsylvania under the Affordable Care Act has greatly increased access to treatment services for hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians.Finally, Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget provides more than $34 million to treat more than 11,250 new individuals with substance use disorder. The Department of Human Services will provide 25 new Opioid Use Disorder Centers of Excellence for individuals with substance use disorder, providing medication-assisted treatment and appropriate wraparound services, such as cognitive-based therapies. After this first phase of implementation, there will be a push for 25 more facilities that would have the capacity to treat 22,500 individuals total.# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img Governor Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw Host a Roundtable to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemiclast_img read more

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Robert Lynn Robinson

first_imgRobert Lynn Robinson, 61, of Patriot, IN, passed away at 9:34  PM, Monday, February 1st, 2016 at his residence. Bobby was born in Cincinnati, OH on October 25, 1954, a son of the late Lois Maxine (Bunger) and Donald  Robinson. He was a graduate of Switzerland County High School, Class of 1972. Bobby was self employed and the owner of Robinson Trucking in Patriot, IN. Bobby loved his little town of Patriot where he attended the Patriot Baptist Church and was the current President of the Patriot Town board. Bobby was a board member for 4 years, having just started his second term.  He enjoyed golfing, boating and loved to ride his Harley. On September 19, 1992 he married Debbie (Gabbard) Robinson who survives him. Bobby was a a loving husband, Dad, Pawpaw, brother and friend to many.In addition to his loving wife Debbie, Bobby is  survived by a daughter, Christina Griffin of Florence, KY; a son, Matt Robinson (Sara), of Crittenden, KY; a step son, Shawn Scudder (Toni), of Bright, IN; a sister, Donna  Hutton (Bob Weber), of Lawrenceburg, IN; by 8 grandchildren; Blake, Hanna, Jarrett, Kylie, Will, Jami, Jacob and Ryan and by nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and by his son Jacob Robinson.Funeral services will be 2 PM, Sunday, February 7 at the Markland Funeral Home in Rising Sun, IN with Rev. Mike Jones officiating. Friends are invited to call Sunday 12-2 PM at Markland Funeral Home.  Burial will be at Eastview Cemetery in Patriot. Memorial donations may be made to the Sons of the American Legion Aurora Post 231 or Lawrenceburg Post 239, cards are available at the funeral home. marklandfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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Rebecca Cole

first_imgRebecca S. Cole, 52, of Versailles passed away Sunday, September 4, 2016 as the result of an automobile accident near Napoleon. She was born at Greensburg on January 29, 1964 the daughter of Gerald and Carol Bevars Powers. She was married to Wendell Cole on March 6, 1986 and he survives. Other survivors include one son Michael (Jacob Cooper) Cole of Louisville, Kentucky; one daughter Myranda (Justin) Horan of Madison; her mother and step-father Carol and Glen Schwanholt of Versailles; step-mother Margaret Powers of Columbus; three sisters Jeanie (Don) Duerstock of Greensburg, Terri Powers of Versailles, and Peggy Crawford of Jacksonville, Florida; one step-brother John Schwanholt of Versailles; step-sister Joan Luedeman of North Vernon, and a host of brothers and sisters in-law, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, and nephews, and in particular two nieces who adored her, Amy Cromer and Amanda Scheel. She was preceded in death by her father, her grandparents Floyd and Laura Bevars and Charles and Mary Powers, and her father and mother-in-law Everett and Dorothy Cole. Becky was a former employee of the Jefferson County Correctional facility in Madison. She had also worked at Blue Flame in Versailles and was a long time employee of the Ripley County Bank. Her favorite past times included doing things with her kids, going to yard sales, attending plays, fishsing,and she had also adopted painting stained glass as a hobby. She also enjoyed spoiling her dog Cooper and her cats Chloe and Sam. Visitation for Becky will be from 4pm to 7pm Wednesday, September 7th at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles. Funeral services will follow at 7pm with Bro. Tim Heim of the Shelby Christian Church officiating. Memorials may be given to the donor’s choice in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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Sheriff: Student in Fort Pierce Stabbed Classmate with Scissors

first_imgOfficials with the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office say they arrested a 13-year-old Forest Grove Middle School student Thursday, and charged the child with one count of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon.An incident took place on Tuesday in a classroom at the Fort Pierce school in which the suspect, who was allegedly being disruptive, subsequently created an altercation and stabbed another student with a pair of scissors.The victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment.Sheriff Ken Mascara says, “Based on the information obtained at the time the incident occurred, it was initially not believed that scissors were used. However, because of our commitment to investigating any incident of violence on a school campus, our detectives conducted additional interviews and determined that they were in fact used to cause harm to the victim.”He adds that the suspect was arrested on a warrant and was later transported to the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice for processing.last_img read more

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Second-half eruption lifts Endicott over MMA

first_img Town report wins award – October 11, 2014 Fenceviewer Staff Bio Latest Posts Latest posts by Fenceviewer Staff (see all)center_img BEVERLY, Mass. — The Maine Maritime Academy Mariners jumped out to a 28-21 lead in the first half, but the Endicott Gulls rallied with five unanswered scores in the second half to secure a 53-28 win in a New England Football Conference game Saturday.MMA gained its halftime lead thanks mostly to hard-nose running of senior fullback Billy Wetherbee and senior running back Ryan O’Neal.Wetherbee carried the ball 34 times for 171 yards and O’Neal broke off big runs and eclipsed the 100-yard mark with two touchdowns in the opening half. The Mariners finished with 366 yards rushing.The Mariners set the tone on the opening drive of the game when O’Neal found a hole in the line for a 36-yard touchdown run just 2:47 into the game.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textLater in the first quarter, Endicott coughed up the ball in MMA territory for a second time, and the Mariners scored again with O’Neal’s second touchdown of the game to make it 14-0.The Gulls got on the board with a touchdown early in the second quarter, but the Mariners answered on the ensuing drive when a 41-yard run by O’Neal set up MMA’s third score of the game.Following O’Neal’s run, Wetherbee fumbled the ball at the one-yard line and Justin Lovely jumped on the loose ball in the end zone with 11:58 left in the first half.The Mariners’ final score came on a Michael Fahey touchdown pass to Lovely with 2:29 left before the halftime break.The still-winless Mariners are idle this weekend and will return to action on the road Oct. 19 at 1:30 p.m., facing the Coast Guard Academy.Find in-depth coverage of local news in The Ellsworth American. Subscribe digitally or in print. Schoodic Grange hosting sale – October 30, 2014 Fitness trainer is now cancer-exercise expert – October 12, 2014last_img read more

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Tennis News French Open: Rohan Bopanna, Roger-Vasselin knocked out in quarter-finals

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Indian tennis star Rohan Bopanna along with his French partner E Roger-Vasselin knocked out of the French Open tennis tournament when the tag team lost a straight-sets in the men’s doubles quarter-finals here on Tuesday.The 13th seeded Indo-French combination went down 6-7, 2-6 to eighth seeds Nikola Mektic of Croatia and Austria’s Alexander Peya in an hour and 32 minutes.In the semi-finals, Mektic and Peya will meet the winners of the last eight clash between Nicolás Jarry of Chile and Maximo Gonzalez of Argentina and the sixth seeded French pair of Pierre-Hugues Herbert and Nicolas Mahut.This would the second time that Bopanna and Roger-Vasselin have come up and lost major tournament after Australian Open in January. last_img read more

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Other Sports Dipa Karmakar secures bronze in vault event in Artistic Gymnastics World Cup

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Dipa Karmakar gave India fans plenty to cheer as she secured the bronze medal in the vault event of the Artistic Gymnastics World Cup event in Cottbus, Germany. Karmakar scored 14.316 to secure the bronze in the tournament, which is also a part of the eight-event qualifying system for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. However, in the balance beam event, the Tripura athlete did not finish well. The Cottbus meet is part of an eight-event qualifying system  for the 2020 Olympics, under which the gymnasts will make the cut based on the their top three scores. Speaking on Karmakar’s achievement, Gymnastics Federation of India vice-president Riyaz Ahmed Bhati said the Olympics qualification goal has come nearer.Read More |Hockey World Cup 2018: India seek repeat of 1975 glory“Karmakar has done well in the first tournament. She will be travelling to two more events out of Australia, Doha and Baku. But this event was the toughest,” Bhati said.Read More |Hero I-League wins silver at SPIA awardsThe 25-year-old has been plagued by a knee injury which she sustained in the Asian Artistic Gymnastics in Bangkok, Thailand. Karmakar underwent corrective surgery on her anterior cruciate ligament in April and was unable to participate throughout the season. Karmakar missed out on the 2018 Commonwealth Games. Although she had regained fitness, her coach Bisweshwar Nandi said her lengthy rehabilitation process resulted in her restricted training. Nandi said she was not yet ready fitness wise for the tournament.However, Karmakar created history in July 2018 as she won the gold medal in the FIG Artistic Gymnastics World Challenge Cup at Mersin, Turkey. Karmakar became the first Indian gymnast to win the gold medal in a world event. In the same competition, she reached the finals of the balance beam event where she finished a credible fourth.Karmakar was in confident mood heading into the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta but in one of the practice sessions ahead of women’s qualification for team and apparatus finals, she hurt her right knee and she was forced to pull out of the final. last_img read more

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Graeme Smith in running for CSA’s director of cricket

first_imgGRAEME Smith is in the running to become Cricket South Africa’s (CSA) first permanently appointed director of cricket.The appointment of the former South Africa men’s captain would help quell doubts about the quality of administrative leadership in a turbulent time for the game in South Africa.Smith confirmed on Saturday that he was interviewed for the position on Friday.TMG Digital has learnt that Corrie van Zyl, CSA’s interim director of cricket when he was suspended last month, and Hussein Manack, a national selector until the panel was dissolved in terms of the restructure prompted by the disappointing men’s World Cup campaign in July, were also interviewed.Smith played 345 games for South Africa across all formats, and captained them 284 times.He presided over 163 wins, 89 losses, 27 draws and a tie.Smith’s 109 Tests as captain, one at the helm of an ICC XI, is a world record.He was appointed at 22 in the aftermath of the 2003 World Cup, when South Africa crashed out in the first round at home.Smith relinquished the one-day reins after the 2011 World Cup, by which time he was no longer the T20 skipper.But he continued to lead South Africa’s Test team until March 2014 — when he announced his retirement during the third and last match of a series against Australia, a month after his 33rd birthday.Many felt he called it quits too soon, and he has subsequently stayed in the game as a commentator.In August 2014 he was named tournament director for CSA’s T20 competition, followed a month later by an appointment to a corporate social responsibility position by financial services company Momentum, a CSA sponsor.Both Van Zyl and Manack likely had their playing careers stunted by apartheid.Most of Van Zyl’s career coincided with South Africa’s isolation, and his international experience was limited to two ODIs on the tour to West Indies in April 1992.A fast bowling allrounder, Van Zyl took 349 wickets at 23.38 and scored a century and 10 half-centuries in his 104 first-class matches.He coached South Africa from January 2010 to March 2011 and was appointed CSA’s general manager in May 2009.Manack, who is of Indian heritage, was prohibited from playing for South Africa by apartheid, but was listed as a non-playing “development” member of the squad that went to India in November 1991 to play three ODIs — the national team’s first engagement after 22 years of isolation. Manack, a highly regarded wicketkeeper-batter in the non-racial structures, was given no other opportunities to play at the highest level.He played 52 first-class matches, scoring three centuries and 11 half-centuries and averaging 27.79.A commentator of 16 years standing, he became a national selector in 2012.Van Zyl and Manack have solid credentials for the position, but Smith is the obvious frontrunner, not least because he is the standard bearer for a more successful era.South Africa established a brand of tough, competitive cricket under his leadership that saw them rise to the No. 1 Test ranking in July 2012 — where they stayed for the rest of his career.Having suffered their worst Test series defeat in 83 years in India last month, which came in the wake of their worst performance at a World Cup, and all that in the shadow of multiple challenges on the administrative front — not least court battles with the players and a provincial affiliate — South Africa are in dire need of the good news that is Smith’s interest in the position.TMG Digital has learnt that the panel that interviewed the three candidates comprised CSA chief executive Thabang Moroe and board members Jack Madiseng, Tebogo Siko, Dawn Makhobo and Shirley Zinn.None of them played first-class cricket, some through no fault of their own. It is understood they will make a decision in the next two weeks.last_img read more

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