Category: hosrajcr

Outdoor Updates: Land swap could allow pipeline to cross the Appalachian Trail

first_imgLand swap could allow pipeline to cross the Appalachian Trail Colley closed a more than 4-minute gap to reach the second place finish, crossing the finish line just 17 seconds after the winner of the race. Grandma’s Marathon is held each year in Duluth, Minnesota. Dominic Ondoro set the course record in 2014 with a time of 2:09:06.  Experts agree that climate change will impact the world, and even the regions of the United States, in different ways. While some areas of the planet may see increased rainfall others will experience more frequent drought, for example. That scenario is playing out right now in Chennai, India, a city of over 10 million people. Satellite images of the rain-fed reservoir, Lake Puzhal, that provides Chennai with water, shows a near-dry lake basin. Another, smaller reservoir, Chembarambakkam Lake, is also going dry. Is this the future? One of India’s biggest cities is running out of water WNC athlete finishes second at Grandma’s Marathon A land swap with the federal government could allow the Mountain Valley Pipeline to cross the Appalachian Trail. The U.S. Department of the Interior could allow the natural gas company to cross the Appalachian Trail at the top of Peters Mountain near the border of Virginia and West Virginia in exchange for land next to Jefferson National Forest owned by Mountain Valley. A runner who trains at ZAP Endurance, a non-profit training center for post-collegiate, Olympic hopefuls in Western North Carolina, came in second place at Grandma’s Marathon last Saturday. Andrew Colley finished the race with a personal best of 2:12:12 and set a new ZAP record, bettering the fastest marathon time recorded by a ZAP athlete by 1:01.  Before the plan goes through it would have to be approved by several federal agencies. The land swap would push the completion of the 303-mile pipeline to next year.  Chennai should be in the middle of monsoon-season right now. But the rains have not arrived and an extreme heat wave is exacerbating conditions. Instead, people stand in long lines for water and restaurants are forced to refuse customers. NPR reports that a man was killed in a fight over water. The government has sent water tankers to residential areas but some people in the hardest-hit areas have abandoned their homes and moved in with relatives. Climate change experts in India blame the crisis on “a toxic mix of bad governance and climate change.”last_img read more

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How the millennial generation could affect the economy over the next five years

first_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Laura ShinThis year, Millennials are expected to surpass Boomers as the largest living American generation, and soon, their effects on the economy will be felt in even greater measure, according a new Standard & Poor’s report released Wednesday.The report by Beth Ann Bovino, Standard & Poor’s U.S. chief economist, noted that this generation, born from 1981 to 1997, numbers 80 million and that they spend an annual $600 billion. By 2020, they could account for $1.4 trillion in spending, or 30% of total retail sales.Surprisingly though, this generation has conservative spending habits similar to those of the Silent Generation, which grew up during and after the Great Generation. What distinguishes Millennials from other generations is the historic student loan debt that the generation carries, which in turn has meant that Millennials (and some of Gen X) have had less access to full-time jobs and wealth than previous cohorts.Bovine looked at what this generation might do over the next five years to see how they might affect the U.S. economy. If the economy continues to strengthen, as Standard & Poor’s projects, there’s potential that Millennials could start making big-ticket purchases that contribute to economic growth. On the other hand, their student loan debt could keep them from spending and not buying houses, costing the economy. continue reading »last_img read more

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Kansas has first US West Nile case of 2005

first_img The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of one human illness, the CDC announced on Jun 20. The infection had already been found in birds, horses, and mosquitoes in 14 states this year. Authorities recommended that people limit mosquito exposure by using insect repellents and emptying any standing water where mosquitoes might lay eggs. About 1 out of 150 infected people experiences the most severe form, West Nile meningitis or encephalitis, which can sometimes be fatal. West Nile fever is less severe and doesn’t involve neurological signs. States are not required to report West Nile fever cases to the CDC. Jun 22, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – West Nile virus has made its US debut in the heartland this year, with Kansas reporting the first human case. CDC’s West Nile virus sitehttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm To aid prevention, the CDC recently expanded its list of approved insect repellents by adding picaridin and oil of lemon eucalyptus to DEET and permethrin. People should use repellents consistently, because once WNV is endemic in an area, surges in infection rates are unpredictable, the CDC said. “This season’s first human case of West Nile virus reminds us of the importance of taking precautions to avoid becoming ill,” Dr. Lyle Petersen, director of the CDC’s Vectorborne Infectious Disease Division, said in a news release. “It’s impossible to predict what this year’s season will hold. So everyone who spends time outdoors should take steps to protect themselves from mosquito bites and West Nile virus.” See also: A 51-year-old from Douglas County, Kan., became ill in mid-May, the KDHE announced. The case was not neuroinvasive. The first human cases of WNV infection in 2004 occurred in New Mexico and Arizona in the last week of May. WNV is spread by bites from infected mosquitoes. It was first identified in the United States in 1999 in New York. Human cases have now been found in each of the 48 contiguous states except Washington. About 17,000 Americans have contracted West Nile virus to date, the CDC said. The disease varies in severity. Most healthy people who are infected experience no illness or only a mild illness. About 20% of those infected show symptoms, typically 3 to 15 days after the mosquito bite, according to the KDHE.last_img read more

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Report: H5N1 virus targets include organs, placenta, fetus

first_imgOct 2, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Researchers from Beijing and New York who conducted pathology studies on tissue samples of a man and a pregnant woman who died of H5N1 avian flu infection found that the virus spread beyond the lungs to other organ systems—even to the fetus.The authors published their findings in the Sep 29 issue of The Lancet. The patients were both from China. The 24-year-old woman whose samples were studied died in November 2005 and was 4 months pregnant; she appears to be China’s second H5N1 case-patient, according to World Health Organization (WHO) reports. The other patient—a 35-year-old man—died in January 2006 and appears to be China’s sixth H5N1 case-patient, according to past WHO statements.Tissues from the patients were collected during autopsies. The researchers’ investigations included in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry studies to detect and identify antibodies to hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein, as well as several assays to detect viral RNA in organ tissue samples.In the two adults, the investigators found viral genomic sequences and antigens in type 2 epithelial cells of the lungs, ciliated and nonciliated epithelial cells of the trachea, T cells of the lymph node, and neurons of the brain. In the placenta, the researchers found evidence of the virus in Hofbauer cells and cytotrophoblasts. Viral sequences, but not antigens, were detected in the intestinal mucosa.In fetal samples, the researchers detected viral evidence and antigens in the lungs, circulating mononuclear cells, and macrophages of the liver.The authors concluded that the virus’s apparent spread beyond the respiratory system has several public health implications, one being that a mother has been shown to transmit the H5N1 virus to her fetus through the placenta.The authors wrote that few epithelial cells in the lungs harbored the virus, which contrasts with the severe histopathological damage they observed.”Direct viral injury to the epithelial cells of the respiratory tract is, in our view, unlikely to cause such severe pathological changes,” they reported, adding that their findings could lend support to the role of cytokine storm, a destructive immune-system overreaction that many researchers believe causes much of the lethal damage in H5N1 infections.Also, the researchers said the study suggests the virus can reach the brain by penetrating the blood-brain barrier or invading certain afferent nerve fibers. However, they reported that a lack of histologic changes in the patients’ brains suggests that viral replication may not be specifically pathogenic.In an editorial accompanying the study, two Chinese researchers—Wai Fu Ng and Ka Fai To—wrote that the virus has been known to affect many organ systems in birds but has been thought mainly to affect the lower respiratory tract in humans. The study adds to accumulating data that support H5N1 transmission to many body sites in humans, they added.The finding that the virus infects epithelial cells in the trachea is a concern, Ng and To wrote. It may suggest that other viral mediators may exist or that the virus might develop mechanisms to overcome respiratory tract defenses. “The clinical significance of such findings needs further assessment,” they wrote.Evidence of the virus in the patients’ intestines could have important implications for infection control, the authors noted.Frederick Hayden, MD, an antiviral expert with the WHO, said the report is the first to contain autopsy data for a pregnant woman or her fetus, according to a Sep 28 Canadian Press (CP) report. “WHO is trying to work with clinicians in affected countries to collect data on H5N1 illness in pregnancy,” he said.Menno de Jong, MD, PhD, a virologist at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, said he’s not surprised that the researchers found the virus in the placenta, because evidence already shows that the virus can circulate in the blood and cause diffuse effects, the CP reported.Gu J, Xie Z, Gao Z, et al. H5N1 infection of the respiratory tract and beyond: a molecular pathology study. Lancet 2007;370(9593):1137-45 [Abstract]Ng W, To K. Pathology of human H5N1 infection: new findings. Lancet 2007;377(9593):1106-8last_img read more

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Why the continued fawning over former Niskayuna supervisor?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSo my faith in the American voter was restored when incumbent Joe Landry was defeated by Republican newcomer Yasmine Syed for Niskayuna town supervisor this past November. Now I read where a Donald Trump-style “love fest” was recreated at Landry’s final 2017 Niskayuna Town Board meeting and baseball fields are to be named in his honor. Hello. This isn’t about baseball or naming ball fields. This is about Niskayuna voters voting against bullying tactics directed at town employees and political candidates. I also see where board member Denise Murphy McGraw still plans on seeking Landry’s “continual counsel” after his departure. What’s that about? I suggest McGraw, as well as the other board members, get with the program as voiced by the people of Niskayuna and support the new town supervisor. If not, I hope to see the voters do the right thing on future election days.John TemplerNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over Bethlehemlast_img read more

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‘It’s necessary’: Greenpeace lauds government’s plan to tax plastics

first_imgEnvironmental watchdog Greenpeace Indonesia has applauded the government for planning to impose a levy on plastic products, describing it as an important measure to reduce the plastic waste that is damaging the environment.“Taxes are one way to constrain uncontrolled plastic consumption, as single-use and non-recyclable plastic has damaged the environment and threatens human and animal life,” Greenpeace spokesperson Muharram Atha Rasyadi said in a statement on Thursday.He added that the levy should be imposed on various kinds of plastic packages for food and beverages and other fast moving consumer goods. The government has set an ambitious target of 70 percent marine debris reduction by 2024; therefore, “real and quick efforts are necessary,” he went on to say.Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrayati has told House of Representatives Commission XI overseeing financial affairs that the government is planning to impose an excise on plastics, among other commodities.The plan would reduce plastic consumption by up to 50 percent, she said, adding that the government would receive revenue of Rp 1.6 trillion (US$116.6 million) each year. It would also force plastic producers to transform themselves into producers of environmentally friendly goods.The government has been planning to impose an excise on plastics since 2017 but has yet to receive approval from lawmakers.Indonesia has been listed as the world’s second-largest marine polluter as 15 percent of 1.3 million tons – 195,000 tons — of plastic waste ends up in rivers and oceans each year. (gis)Topics : “An excise on single-use plastic products, such as plastic bags and straws, should be prioritized,” Muharram went on to say.Such a plan would be an encouragement for industry to apply circular-economy mechanisms, which prioritize reusage and refilling activities, Greenpeace added. The circular economy is a sustainability concept that seeks to minimize waste by deploying resources optimally through reuse, recycling and remanufacturing.Read also: Indonesia revives excise plan on plastics, dirty vehicles and sweet drinks“We are at the peak of a plastic crisis, because our landfills can’t hold those kinds of waste anymore. Our rivers and seas have become trash bins for these plastic products,” said Muharram.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw Host a Roundtable to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic

first_img April 28, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Williamsport, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw were joined by Rep. Jeff Wheeland, state and local officials, law enforcement and health care professionals at the Pennsylvania College of Technology to discuss local and statewide efforts to lead the nation in combating the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic in Pennsylvania. In an effort to confront this epidemic collaboratively, Governor Wolf is conducting roundtables statewide to discuss the initiatives of his administration, the state legislature, county agencies, treatment centers, hospitals, medical schools, and to listen to local officials about the challenges they are facing.“Fighting Pennsylvania’s opioid and heroin epidemic is a top priority for my administration,” said Governor Wolf. “These roundtables are an opportunity to work collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis.”“We appreciate the opportunity to sit down with Governor Wolf today in order to increase public awareness of the heroin and opioid crisis facing our rural counties,” Sen. Yaw said.  “However, this is not just a rural issue. It’s a statewide issue.  Fortunately, we have a coalition in Lycoming County called Project Bald Eagle that is working to stem the tide of heroin and opioid abuse through education, prevention, treatment, enforcement and data monitoring.  Undoubtedly, it will take a statewide-wide effort to combat this issue and we thank the Governor for his involvement.”Governor Wolf was joined by Secretary Gary Tennis, Representative Jeff Wheeland, Lycoming County Commissioner Rick Mirabito, Williamsport Mayor Gabriel Campana, and a number of other state and local leaders and health care professionals, students, and professors. The governor lauded the efforts of these legislators and drew attention to the work of the Center for Rural PA, a bipartisan, bicameral legislative agency chaired by Senator Gene Yaw, who has been holding hearings with the Center on the opioid abuse and heroin use crisis since 2014.Beginning in 2014, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania convened a series of statewide public hearings to examine the increasing use of heroin and opioid abuse and addiction rates in rural Pennsylvania communities. The hearings were in response to questions posed by state legislators on the increasing number of arrests and overdose deaths attributed to heroin and opioid abuse within their respective legislative districts.The Wolf Administration hopes that these discussions are just the beginning of a larger conversation with both Republicans and Democrats in the House and Senate as well as local officials, law enforcement, emergency responders, and health care professionals.“I look forward to continue working collaboratively with the General Assembly and community leaders to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic,” said Governor Wolf. “The magnitude of the addiction and overdose death epidemic in Pennsylvania is shocking: at least seven Pennsylvanians die every day from a drug overdose. With nearly 2,500 overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2014 and estimates that the 2015 total will be higher, a collaborative effort on the federal, state, and local levels is crucial in combating this crisis.”Some of the administration’s initiatives in the fight against heroin include: signing a statewide standing order for naloxone, making it possible for all Pennsylvanians to access this life-saving drug; equipping the Pennsylvania State Police with naloxone so that those troopers who are first on the scene of an overdose can have another tool on-hand during these emergencies; partnering with Adapt Pharma to make Narcan available to public high schools across the state at no cost; developing the ABC-MAP prescription drug monitoring program to detect and prevent prescription fraud and abuse, which contribute to addiction; and appointing a director for the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Office, who will work to ensure that the PDMP meets its goal of assisting healthcare professionals in identifying patients that would benefit from treatment.In an effort to curtail drug addiction and curb the supply of excess drugs that can be used illicitly, the Department of Health is leading an effort to build upon the opioid prescribing guidelines already created, including specialty specific guidelines for emergency department providers, dentists, obstetricians and gynecologists, and pharmacists. These guidelines give healthcare providers direction for safe and effective pain relief practices, with greater emphasis on non-opioid therapies and greater caution to prevent addiction and diversion. In addition, the DOH recently joined dozens of healthcare organizations, medical experts, and consumer advocacy groups in signing petitions requesting changes to federal pain management requirements that are believed to foster dangerous prescribing practices.DOH is also working with the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs to develop the “warm hand-off” process, whereby overdose survivors would be taken directly from the emergency department to a licensed drug treatment provider, as well as Pennsylvania’s Prescription Drug Take-Back Program. This program helps communities properly dispose of unused prescriptions at any of the 400+ police station locations across Pennsylvania. To date, approximately 40,000 pounds of prescription drugs have been taken back and destroyed.Governor Wolf’s decision to expand Medicaid eligibility in Pennsylvania under the Affordable Care Act has greatly increased access to treatment services for hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians.Finally, Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget provides more than $34 million to treat more than 11,250 new individuals with substance use disorder. The Department of Human Services will provide 25 new Opioid Use Disorder Centers of Excellence for individuals with substance use disorder, providing medication-assisted treatment and appropriate wraparound services, such as cognitive-based therapies. After this first phase of implementation, there will be a push for 25 more facilities that would have the capacity to treat 22,500 individuals total.# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img Governor Wolf and Senator Gene Yaw Host a Roundtable to Address Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemiclast_img read more

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Robert Lynn Robinson

first_imgRobert Lynn Robinson, 61, of Patriot, IN, passed away at 9:34  PM, Monday, February 1st, 2016 at his residence. Bobby was born in Cincinnati, OH on October 25, 1954, a son of the late Lois Maxine (Bunger) and Donald  Robinson. He was a graduate of Switzerland County High School, Class of 1972. Bobby was self employed and the owner of Robinson Trucking in Patriot, IN. Bobby loved his little town of Patriot where he attended the Patriot Baptist Church and was the current President of the Patriot Town board. Bobby was a board member for 4 years, having just started his second term.  He enjoyed golfing, boating and loved to ride his Harley. On September 19, 1992 he married Debbie (Gabbard) Robinson who survives him. Bobby was a a loving husband, Dad, Pawpaw, brother and friend to many.In addition to his loving wife Debbie, Bobby is  survived by a daughter, Christina Griffin of Florence, KY; a son, Matt Robinson (Sara), of Crittenden, KY; a step son, Shawn Scudder (Toni), of Bright, IN; a sister, Donna  Hutton (Bob Weber), of Lawrenceburg, IN; by 8 grandchildren; Blake, Hanna, Jarrett, Kylie, Will, Jami, Jacob and Ryan and by nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and by his son Jacob Robinson.Funeral services will be 2 PM, Sunday, February 7 at the Markland Funeral Home in Rising Sun, IN with Rev. Mike Jones officiating. Friends are invited to call Sunday 12-2 PM at Markland Funeral Home.  Burial will be at Eastview Cemetery in Patriot. Memorial donations may be made to the Sons of the American Legion Aurora Post 231 or Lawrenceburg Post 239, cards are available at the funeral home. marklandfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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Rebecca Cole

first_imgRebecca S. Cole, 52, of Versailles passed away Sunday, September 4, 2016 as the result of an automobile accident near Napoleon. She was born at Greensburg on January 29, 1964 the daughter of Gerald and Carol Bevars Powers. She was married to Wendell Cole on March 6, 1986 and he survives. Other survivors include one son Michael (Jacob Cooper) Cole of Louisville, Kentucky; one daughter Myranda (Justin) Horan of Madison; her mother and step-father Carol and Glen Schwanholt of Versailles; step-mother Margaret Powers of Columbus; three sisters Jeanie (Don) Duerstock of Greensburg, Terri Powers of Versailles, and Peggy Crawford of Jacksonville, Florida; one step-brother John Schwanholt of Versailles; step-sister Joan Luedeman of North Vernon, and a host of brothers and sisters in-law, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, and nephews, and in particular two nieces who adored her, Amy Cromer and Amanda Scheel. She was preceded in death by her father, her grandparents Floyd and Laura Bevars and Charles and Mary Powers, and her father and mother-in-law Everett and Dorothy Cole. Becky was a former employee of the Jefferson County Correctional facility in Madison. She had also worked at Blue Flame in Versailles and was a long time employee of the Ripley County Bank. Her favorite past times included doing things with her kids, going to yard sales, attending plays, fishsing,and she had also adopted painting stained glass as a hobby. She also enjoyed spoiling her dog Cooper and her cats Chloe and Sam. Visitation for Becky will be from 4pm to 7pm Wednesday, September 7th at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles. Funeral services will follow at 7pm with Bro. Tim Heim of the Shelby Christian Church officiating. Memorials may be given to the donor’s choice in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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Sheriff: Student in Fort Pierce Stabbed Classmate with Scissors

first_imgOfficials with the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office say they arrested a 13-year-old Forest Grove Middle School student Thursday, and charged the child with one count of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon.An incident took place on Tuesday in a classroom at the Fort Pierce school in which the suspect, who was allegedly being disruptive, subsequently created an altercation and stabbed another student with a pair of scissors.The victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment.Sheriff Ken Mascara says, “Based on the information obtained at the time the incident occurred, it was initially not believed that scissors were used. However, because of our commitment to investigating any incident of violence on a school campus, our detectives conducted additional interviews and determined that they were in fact used to cause harm to the victim.”He adds that the suspect was arrested on a warrant and was later transported to the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice for processing.last_img read more

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