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Belles Against Violence seeks to educate College community

first_imgSaint Mary’s College students are working to spread the word about the Belles Against Violence Office, or BAVO. Sophomores Audrina Massey and Kate Hill are both members of the organization, and said they are seeking to create a safer environment at Saint Mary’s. Hill is an ally under the “sub-category” of BAVO known as Green Dot.“As an ally we make sure … that we are made available to those people to let them know that we are confidential sources they can come and talk to,” Hill said.Massey is on the Student Advisory Committee, or SAC, and also works on the Green Dot committee. Massey explained all of the committees come together to work on their common mission.“Each committee has their own events but work together to really put on events and spread awareness and education about sexual assault, sexual violence and relationship stalking and how to maybe help those who have been a victim, or a survivor,” she said.Hill explained that Green Dot “focuses on trying to prevent red dot situations.” Red dot situations include any form of sexual assault, sexual violence or relationship stalking.“We stand by survivors and offer our support to those that we can. By spreading awareness, we hope to make the warning signs more apparent and inform as many people as possible,” Hill said.In doing so, red dots can become green dots as more people become prepared and knowledgeable for when a red dot situation occurs, Hill said.With several resources on campus, BAVO offers confidential resources where students can discuss their story with a peer without any obligation to report their experiences. Massey added other confidential resources at Saint Mary’s include Campus Ministry, as well as Health and Counseling. She said BAVO is a point of contact for anyone who has experienced sexual assault, sexual violence or relationship stalking.BAVO puts on several events throughout the academic year. Last week was Green Dot Activism Week, which included events to spread knowledge to the students and faculty about BAVO and Green Dot. Another event BAVO put on was called “Guac and Talk.”“We just had an open space for people to discuss any issues on campus regarding sexual assault, sexual violence and relationship stalking, and things maybe BAVO can do better,” Massey said of ‘Guac and Talk.’Coming up in the spring semester is a public event called “Take Back the Night.” The event is designed to support survivors, Massey explained.“It’s a candlelight vigil that starts here at Saint Mary’s and ends at the Grotto at Notre Dame, and it’s a place where people can either share their experience or just show support for all the survivors,” she said. “It’s not just students that take part in it, it’s faculty and staff … It’s a nationwide event that happens every year.”Hill and Massey also encouraged students to participate in Green Dot training sessions that will be held in January, in order to teach participants different skills about how to handle difficult situations.Massey said there are numerous ways to get involved with BAVO.“You can become a BAVO ally, and you can either of course be a part of Green Dot awareness and outreach or events and campaigns,” she said. “You can show your support by coming to events just throughout the year … BAVO is really about helping our students. So that’s what we are trying to do, so if you really just want to watch out for your Belles and just make sure everybody is safe, then I would highly encourage Belles Against Violence.”Tags: Belles Against Violence Office, Green Dot, sexual assaultlast_img read more

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GMP announces dividend

first_imgGREEN MOUNTAIN POWERANNOUNCES QUARTERLY DIVIDEND COLCHESTER, VT . . . Directors of Green Mountain Power Corporation (NYSE:GMP) have announced a quarterly cash dividend of $0.22 per share on the utility’s Common Stock, payable December 31, 2004 to holders of record at the close of business on December 17, 2004. The indicated annual dividend rate is $0.88. Green Mountain Power Corporation (www.greenmountainpower.biz(link is external)) is a Vermont-based energy services company serving 89,000 electric customers.– 30 —last_img

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Suozzi, Mangano Trade Barbs as County Exec Race Kicks Off

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano (Left) faces off against Democrat Tom Suozzi (Right) who is vying for his old position.Well, that didn’t take long.Former Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi and the man who unseated him four years ago, Ed Mangano, traded barbs Thursday as the two rivals officially kicked off the 2013 race for county executive.Suozzi, fresh off his Democratic primary victory Tuesday, held a press conference at the party’s campaign headquarters in East Meadow where he characterized Republican Mangano as a “compulsive borrower” who has mismanaged the county’s finances since taking office in 2009 and has driven Nassau’s debt to historic heights.“The Mangano administration has not cut spending, in fact it increased spending dramatically,” Suozzi blasted.“We are gonna cut up his credit card because that’s what you need to do with compulsive borrowers,” Suozzi added before sticking to his promise (sort of) by taking a pair of scissors to a fake Mangano credit card.Mangano’s administration was quick to respond with familiar attacks about the former county executive’s record of raising taxes.“Tom Suozzi is a compulsive liar and serial tax hiker,” Brian Nevin, Mangano’s chief spokesman shot back in a statement.“Suozzi hiked Nassau’s debt by $402 million while Ed Mangano reduced debt by millions,” he continued. “Tom Suozzi lied when he claimed he wouldn’t raise our taxes…..Suozzi raised property taxes by 23 percent, put a new tax on electricity, natural gas, home heating oil and EVEN tried to place a tax on Food and a toll on the LIE.”Suozzi, the Nassau County Executive from 2002-2009, claimed that Mangano increased the county’s long-term debt by $566 million, pushing it to its current figure of $3.5 billion. The previous high, he said, was $3.2 billion in 2001 under Republican County Executive Tom Gulotta.Mangano’s campaign said the county executive actually decreased total debt by $2.4 million from the end of 2009 to 2012.“Taxpayers couldn’t trust Tom Suozzi then, and they surely can’t trust him now,” Nevin added.Suozzi laid out a range of other concerns regarding the county, including a trimmer Nassau County Police Department, the deterioration of Nassau’s quality of life and its roads and residents still suffering from Superstorm Sandy.Suozzi, apparently re-energized since his ouster, said he’s excited for the next two months and reaffirmed his commitment to Nassau residents if he wins.“I will serve my entire four-year term. I’m not running for any other higher office, I’ve been there I’ve done that,” he said, referencing his failed gubernational bid in 2006.Mangano defeated Suozzi by 386 votes in 2009.Voters will decide who wins the rematch on Nov. 5.last_img read more

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IRS “Future State” could be sad state of affairs

first_img“Nothing is more certain than death and taxes.”  Certainly you’ve heard that expression.  These days there is a great deal of uncertainty as to the future of taxpayer relationships with the IRS.  National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson recently delivered her Annual Report to Congress.  In her report she refers to an IRS vision for its future role vis-à-vis U.S. taxpayers, which has become known as the Future State plan.Unfortunately, some of her conclusions align with our observations that suggest a more remote and less approachable – rather than a kinder, gentler – IRS.  Olson calls out proposed increases in IRS user fees, and the agency’s plans to reduce person-to-person contact and refer some common tax law inquiries to outside, paid professionals.  She sees this as likely to segregate taxpayers into haves and have-nots, those who can afford to pay for tax compliance assistance, and those who may find it beyond their means.  Olson refers to it as a “pay-to-play” policy, and uses as just one example the fee charged by the IRS for a taxpayer who needs to satisfy a tax obligation on an installment basis.  Not only is there a fee, but the IRS has proposed to make this option even more expensive.There are other fees that provide dramatic examples of disadvantaging less affluent taxpayers.  For 2016 the IRS is eliminating its tiered fee structure for requesting relief – via private letter ruling – from the 60-day limit for completing an IRA or employer plan indirect rollover. continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Would an imperfect vaccine be useful in a flu pandemic?

first_imgApr 11, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A mathematical modeling study suggests that a modestly effective vaccine could keep an influenza pandemic from striking more than 10% of the US population, but only if large amounts of vaccine were distributed quickly and the virus was not too highly contagious. The modeling study seems to lend some support to the US strategy of stockpiling a vaccine based on recent strains of H5N1 avian flu, which won’t precisely match an emerging pandemic strain. But the model incorporates many assumptions that may or may not prove accurate in the event of a pandemic, and experts note that very little H5N1 vaccine would be available if a pandemic occurred anytime soon. Germann TC, Kadau K, Longini IM, et al. Mitigation strategies for pandemic influenza in the United States. Proc Nat Acad Sci 2006 Apr 11;103(15):5935-40 [Abstract] Germann and two associates, Kai Kadau and Catherine A. Macken, all of Los Alamos National Laboratory, worked on the study with Ira M. Longini Jr., a biostatistician from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington in Seattle. See also: “Aggressive” production and distribution of vaccine could control a pandemic with an R of less than 1.9, the model predicted. “We believe that a large stockpile of avian-based vaccine with potential pandemic influenza antigens, coupled with the capacity to rapidly make a better-matched vaccine based on human strains, would be the best strategy to mitigate pandemic influenza,” the authors write. “This effort needs to be coupled with a rapid vaccine distribution system capable of distributing at least 10 million doses per week to affected regions of the U.S.” Other experts who were asked to comment on the study had different reactions. Travel restrictions alone would accomplish little, according to the simulations. A 90% reduction in travel would slow the virus’s spread by only a few days to a few weeks, depending on transmissibility, and would not dent the ultimate size of the pandemic. Other control strategies used alone could limit a pandemic only if the virus had relatively low transmissibility (R of 1.6), the model predicted. For example, targeted use of antiviral drugs could succeed in that case, provided the supply was adequate and close contacts of patients could be quickly identified. But if R were 1.8, the nation would need a “prohibitively large” 51 million treatment courses of antivirals. Dr. Gregory Poland, a vaccine expert at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said the situation with the H5N1 vaccine being made for the US government points up the problems with the predictions. As was reported recently, the vaccine seems effective in about half of recipients, but it takes 12 times the dose used in seasonal flu vaccines, he noted. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its goals, the NIH said in a news release, were to determine how to slow the spread of a pandemic virus long enough to permit development and distribution of a well-matched vaccine and also how to limit the number of cases to less than 10% of the population, the percentage in an average flu season. The model projected that without any control effort and an R of 1.9, the virus would spread across the nation within 30 days of its first arrivals, that 122 million people would ultimately fall ill, and that the pandemic would peak in 85 days. With an R number of 2.4 and no control effort, as many as 151 million would get sick, according to the model. William Schaffner, MD, a hospital epidemiologist and professor in the infectious disease division at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, said he found the study reassuring, though he had not examined it closely. “The ultimate take-home line was that even a partially effective vaccine is an important part of the strategy,” he said.center_img For a highly transmissible virus (R greater than 1.9), it would take a combination of measures to limit the pandemic, the model predicted. For example, the combined use of vaccination, targeted antiviral use (3 million courses), school closures, social distancing, and travel restrictions could work at an R level as high as 2.4, the authors predict. With a moderately transmissible virus (meaning each case leads to fewer than 1.9 additional cases), “Our model suggests that the rapid production and distribution of vaccines, even if poorly matched to the circulating strains, could significantly slow disease spread and limit the number ill to less than 10% of the population, particularly if children are preferentially vaccinated,” says the report by Timothy C. Germann and colleagues. With a more contagious virus, additional measures such as school closings, travel bans, and antiviral drugs would have to be used in combination with vaccination, says the report published online last week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, a leading pandemic preparedness advocate, had a sharply different view of the study. “I think it’s based on a number of assumptions which in the real world won’t happen,” he said. “The idea that we’ll even have vaccine to consider in terms of dealing with the pandemic is at this point not likely for the vast majority of the world.” Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site, said “any number” of assumptions used in the model could be questioned. “I continue to worry that far too much credence is being put into theoretical models that lack reality testing in the likely world of a pandemic,” he said. “A moderately effective vaccine would work if you could get it into enough people,” said Poland, who directs the Mayo Vaccine Research Group and Program in Translational Immunovirology. “This current vaccine, if we used the whole world manufacturing capacity, offers enough doses for somewhere around 37.5 million people. So that’s not an answer.” He added that it may be necessary to make more than one vaccine, given the different clades (families) of H5N1 virus that have emerged. With a very limited supply of a vaccine for which two doses are recommended, the model showed it would be less helpful to vaccinate a given number of people with the two doses than to give just one dose to twice as many people. The model simulated the unfolding of pandemic flu in a US population of 281 million over 180 days. It factored in US census data about population distribution and commuting patterns and assumptions about the frequency of interpersonal contacts. It assumed that a few infected people would arrive from abroad each day at 14 airports in the United States. The researchers ran the simulations with four different reproductive (R) numbers (the number of additional people infected by each infected person), ranging from 1.6 to 2.4. He added that building up the capacity to treat the sick is important, but the main emphasis in pandemic preparedness should be on vaccination and other preventive measures. “The results [of the study] were so affirming of the general thoughts of the public health community that it’s really very reassuring, and I hope it stimulates further what I think is already a strong effort by HHS [the Department of Health and Human Services] to stimulate vaccine production and research on new ways to produce the flu vaccine and make better flu vaccines.” Poland also said no one knows how contagious the next pandemic virus will be. “My understanding is that the estimated R number for the 1918 pandemic was right around 3,” higher than the maximum of 2.4 used in the study, he said. “You wonder now if we truly have a novel subtype that’s easily transmissible, given the travel we have, if we wouldn’t have higher numbers. The average family is bigger than two people.” NIH news releasehttp://www.nigms.nih.gov/News/Results/FluModel040306last_img read more

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Russian roulette

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Virus fallout takes heavy toll on young workers

first_img‘Pretty scary’ The Kantar study indicated that a majority of young people expect to suffer the consequences of the crisis in the future — more than any other generation. Young women are particularly vulnerable. British group the Young Women’s Trust said more than a third (36 percent) worked in sectors hardest hit by lockdown measures, such as catering, retail, leisure and entertainment.For men, the figure is 25 percent.The sectors are also major providers of part-time jobs favored by students.In Spain — another European country hard-hit by the disease — unemployment has soared for young people aged 25 and under, reaching 33 percent in the first quarter of this year.”Almost half of the job losses that have occurred since the start of the crisis are concentrated on people aged under 35,” said social security minister Jose Luis Escriva.One of them is David, 35, who was a lifeguard at a swimming club in Madrid until he was laid off on March 13, robbing him of financial security — and peace of mind.”You find yourself without savings, without money. It’s pretty scary,” he said.”My parents are giving me money until I get unemployment benefits, because otherwise I can’t pay the bills, the food, the rent for my garage space.” Pierre is far from being an isolated case in Britain, which is gradually easing out of stay-at-home restrictions, after an outbreak that has left more than 40,000 dead.The Resolution Foundation, which aims to improve living standards for low- and middle-income families, estimated up to 640,000 18-24-year-olds could lose their jobs this year.That will take the number of unemployed in that age group to over one million, the think-tank said. Its projection is backed up by the Institute of Student Employers, which said more than a quarter of companies are cutting back on graduate recruitment. Topics : Internships are also being reduced by almost a third, it added, after questioning 124 companies.The pattern looks set to be repeated elsewhere, with concerns that job losses, purchasing power and confidence could hit young people, just as did in the 2008 financial crisis.Half of the world’s so-called “Millennials” — those aged 25-34 — and the “Generation Z” of 18-24 year olds were already feeling the effects of the global economic meltdown, according to a study by consultancy firm Kantar in May.Other studies, including those from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the International Labor Organization, indicate the pandemic is worsening inequality.Young and less qualified people are often on the frontline in the fight against the virus, the OECD noted.The ILO said one in six under-29s had stopped working since the outbreak began and those who have kept their jobs have seen their working hours reduced by 23 percent. When Britain went into coronavirus lockdown on March 23, the management at Pierre’s employer, a recruitment start-up in London, told staff not to worry about their jobs.But just hours later, the 26-year-old received an email from his boss asking him to call. “I understood right away. It was fairly brutal,” he told AFP.He was then laid off with about 15 percent of his colleagues.last_img read more

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Ian Wright slams Arsenal flop Shkodran Mustafi for crucial error against Tottenham

first_imgShkodran Mustafi was at fault for the concession of a second half penalty against Spurs (Picture: Getty)Ian Wright slammed error-prone Arsenal defender Shkodran Mustafi after he gifted Tottenham a way back into Saturday’s north London derby.The Gunners looked set to record a first league win on Spurs turf for five years when they led until the 74th minute through Aaron Ramsey’s brilliantly taken opening goal.Mauricio Pochettino’s side, however, were gifted a way back into the contest with 15 minutes remaining when Harry Kane, standing a yard off-side when Christian Eriksen delivered a teasing free-kick, was needlessly barged over by Mustafi.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe Germany international had been asked to play in an unfamiliar right-back position and had coped manfully until that point but Wright could hardly hide his ire for a player who regularly suffers from rushes of blood to the head.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘A great game with a great atmosphere,’ Wright said on his YouTube channel. ‘I thought the manager got the shape right. It’s just frustrating. It feels like a loss to me when you look at some of the decisions. Ian Wright slams Arsenal flop Shkodran Mustafi for crucial error against Tottenham Advertisement Harry Kane’s goal was his record ninth in north London derbies (Picture: Getty)‘Their goal was offside but obviously Mustafi’s fingerprints are all over the crime scene. Pushing him in the back – they get and score the penalty.’Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang had a chance to steal the bragging rights at the death with a penalty of his own, but Hugo Lloris produced a vital save.Wright added: ‘You have to be really positive because we went there and attacked them and should have won the game. The boss deserves a lot of credit.‘Sokratis was magnificent, Leno was fantastic. Ramsey, someone who is leaving the club, his first-half performance was magnificent.‘I won’t be too down even though I’ve said it feels like a loss.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Comment Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 2 Mar 2019 4:25 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisementlast_img read more

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Swedish municipalities group denies big pensions debt is big problem

first_imgSkanida claimed that new calculations showed that nine out of 10 inhabitants in Sweden were at risk of increased taxation as local and regional authorities could be forced to raise taxes to finance the pension debt and balance their books.Problem ‘exaggerated’ Annika Wallenskog, chief economist of the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR or SKL), confirmed the debt figures published by Skandia, but said that since the debt burden was effectively decreasing, there was no major problem.“It’s a big debt, but not a big problem,” she told IPE.The Skandia report was done every year, she said, but described the problem outlined as “exaggerated”.“The debt has been going down in proportion to salaries since 2015,” she said.The overall figure was so high because of remaining pension liabilities from the pre-1998 pay-as-you-go pension system that the municipalities and regions used to operate, she said.In 1998, the local authorities began funding their staff pensions, she said.“The local authorities are paying for the two systems, but the debt is going down”Annika Wallenskog, chief economist of the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions“So now they’re paying for the two systems, but the debt is going down,” said Wallenskog.Rather than politicians now needing to do something to alleviate the problem, she said what was needed was for civil servants to keep track of the liabilities and make forecasts of future costs.“We have already asked the 290 local and 20 regional councils if they know what the pension costs will be in the next three or four years, and they do know. But not all of them know how much the debt would be in the next 10 years,” she said.Tax rises were possible as a result of the pensions burden, Wallenskog said, but only at a minimal level.“It is possible taxes could rise by one or two tenths of a percent, but only for a couple of years in some municipalities,” she said. Pensions firm Skandia in Sweden warned in a new report that politicians must act over large municipal pension liabilities, but the lobby group for the local authorities has played down the issue, saying that in relative terms the debts are falling.Publishing its report, ‘Hidden pension liabilities risk tax increases’, Skandia said pension liabilities of the country’s local and regional authorities grew SEK4.5bn (€417m) last year to SEK478bn. Some SEK324bn – nearly three-quarters – of this was hidden by not appearing on the local governments’ balance sheets, the firm said.Greger Gustafson, pension specialist for local and regional authorities at Skandia, said: “If Sweden is to be able to maintain the high level of welfare that citizens expect, it is high time that politicians began to prioritise the financing of pension debts in order to avoid cuts in welfare or increased taxes around Sweden.”last_img read more

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High-profile tennis star looking to buy Kingscliff beachfront mansion

first_imgA tennis star has shown interest in a luxury beachfront home at 44-48 North Point Ave, Kingscliff.A LUXURY Kingscliff property has proved to be a hit with a tennis star who is in negotiations for the mansion that features a pool and tennis court.The resort-style property spans three beachfront blocks and has an eye-watering $6.995 million price tag.It has attracted plenty of interest since it was served up to the market in September.MORE NEWS: Construction king creates ultimate smart homeMORE NEWS: Second deal sealed for developer’s mansion Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenInside Kyle Sandilands $3 million country retreat01:05One of the potential buyers is said to be a high-profile female athlete who will make the most of the property’s full-sized, floodlit tennis court.The tennis player is looking to purchase the property as a home base.Not a bad spot for a hit of tennis.LJ Hooker Kingscliff agent Nick Witheriff, who is marketing the home alongside Carol Witheriff, could not reveal any further details on the prospective buyer.He expected a deal to be sealed within the next few weeks.“It’s unique because it is the only property available with a tennis court on the beachfront between Byron Bay and the Gold Coast,” Mr Witheriff said.“It’s also the only property that has just under 2000sq m of land over three separate lots.“With land prices now, the listing price is equivalent to land value so it’s a great opportunity for someone to buy well below replacement value.”More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoThe property has a $6.995 million price tag.A deal is set to be sealed within weeks.The five-bedroom house at 44-48 North Point Ave was designed by award-winning architect Paul Uhlmann and features beach access, an 18m resort-style saltwater pool and a parents’ retreat known as the ‘round house’.The interiors match the coastal surrounds with whitewashed oak floorboards, polished concrete flooring, custom stonework, large glass windows and doors and tropical gardens.Mr Witheriff likened the location to the Glitter Strip’s Millionaires’ Row.“This street is the jewel in the Tweed Coast crown — it’s the Hastings St of Noosa and the Hedges Ave of the Gold Coast,” he said.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:01Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAustralian homes fit for a celebrity01:01last_img read more

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