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Odds & Ends: Frozen’s Josh Gad Reunites With Disney & More!

first_img View Comments Bobby Cannavale Tony Nominees Bobby Cannavale and Jude Law Join Forces in Spy Two-time Tony nominees Bobby Cannavale and Jude Law are to star in an international spy comedy imaginatively titled Spy. According to Deadline the movie will be released on Memorial Day 2015. Of course, we’ve got Cannavale in the upcoming movie musical remake of Annie to look forward to before then—the tuner is set to open in a theater near you December 19. Star Files Frozen’s Josh Gad to Reunite With Disney Another Hollywood project for Book of Mormon alum Josh Gad! The Frozen star has once again teamed up with Disney, this time for a family comedy-adventure. Deadline reports that the Tony nominee and his writing partner Ryan Dixon will be working together on the as yet untitled project for the studio. Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Of Mice and Men’s Leighton Meester on Finding Her Stage Voice Gossip Girl’s Leighton Meester has opened up about how she’s coped with making the transition from screen to Broadway in Of Mice and Men. The star told Yahoo: ” I had a sense that on stage I’d have to find my voice louder than in a close-up in a movie.” Another difference between the two mediums? “You are always in frame when you are on stage. Everyone can see you. You aren’t waiting for your close-ups.” Josh Gad Leighton Meesterlast_img read more

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Alumni Awards

first_imgFarmers, advocates, entrepreneurs and educators topped this year’s list of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association’s best and brightest alumni.“We are excited about the 2017 honorees,” said Joel McKie, 2017 president of the CAES Alumni Association. “We are proud of their exceptional contributions and representation of our association.”The association presented the 2017 awards at a banquet held on Sept. 22 at the Classic Center in Athens, Georgia.In addition to the alumni awards, the association also inducted former Georgia Department of Transportation Commissioner Wayne Shackelford and pioneering poultry businessman Bill Baisley into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame.To find out more about these new inductees, visit tinyurl.com/GAaghalloffame2017.This year’s Alumni Awards of Excellence went to three CAES alumni who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. This year’s winners include:Keith Kelly, owner of Farmview Market in Madison, GeorgiaKelly, who graduated in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics, recently launched Farmview Market on U.S. Highway 441, south of Madison, Georgia. He built his career around supplying farmers with the tools they need.His company, Kelly Products, provides farmers with specialty plant protection chemicals and developed chemical registration software for state agricultural and environmental oversight agencies nationwide.In 1998, Kelly purchased the right to manufacture and distribute all Sevin insecticide products nationwide for home and garden uses. In 2005, Kelly purchased the 4,000-acre Rock House Farm in Leesburg, Georgia. The farm produces cattle, hogs, sweet corn and row crops. In 2016, Kelly expanded Rock House Farm to Morgan County, Georgia, where he established a dairy and creamery. Kelly’s latest venture, Farmview Market, is a combination butcher shop, farmers market and local gourmet shop. D.J. Sheppard, recruitment and retention coordinator for Georgia FFA and Georgia Agricultural Education programsD.J. Sheppard, who graduated in 1975 with bachelor’s degrees in animal science and agricultural education, worked in agricultural education classrooms in Georgia for 42 years and has impacted the lives of thousands of young people.During his years in the classroom, he sought to leave each student with a well-developed sense of responsibility and a better understanding of how farmers work in concert with nature to feed the world.Sheppard now serves as the recruitment and retention coordinator for Georgia FFA and Georgia Agricultural Education programs and helps new agriculture teachers settle into their positions.Jimmy Hill, retired Georgia Power engineerJimmy Hill, who received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering from CAES in 1971, worked for Georgia Power for 30 years. He focused on promoting the energy efficiency of heat pump systems to Georgians. He also worked with Vidalia onion farmers to develop controlled-atmosphere storage systems and served as the first chairman of the Georgia Food Processing Advisory Council.Hill is known by his friends and colleagues as an innovative problem solver and a passionate advocate for Georgia agriculture and farmers.Today, Hill works with faculty in CAES and the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences on the AgrAbility program, which enables farmers with disabilities to continue to farm. The alumni association also honored three young alumni with its CAES Young Alumni Achievement Awards. These awards recognize CAES alumni under 35 who have achieved excellence in their chosen fields or in their communities. The 2017 award winners include:Matt Coley, co-owner and manager of Coley FarmsColey, who graduated with his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics in 2003 and his master’s degree in agricultural economics in 2005, works with his father to run Coley Farms, the family’s Vienna, Georgia-based agribusiness.In addition to farming 3,400 acres of cotton and 300 acres of peanuts, the family operates Coley Gin and Fertilizer. Georgia Trend magazine recognized Matt Coley as one of 25 “movers and shakers” in Georgia agribusiness.Trey Cutts III, assistant professor and Cooperative Extension System specialist at Auburn UniversityTrey Cutts, who graduated with his bachelor’s degree in turfgrass management in 2007 and his master’s degree in crop and soil sciences in 2010, provides agronomic solutions to regional Extension agents through research and programming.After receiving his doctoral degree in plant breeding from Texas A&M University, Cutts worked with several international plant breeding institutions before returning to the Southeast U.S. to work for Auburn University.Farrah Hegwood Newberry, executive director for Georgia Milk ProducersFarrah Newberry, who graduated in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural communication, is the executive director for Georgia Milk Producers, an organization that educates dairy farmers and governing officials on issues affecting Georgia’s dairy industry.In her 17 years with Georgia Milk Producers, Newberry has guided the organization through monumental industry shifts and provided direct help to the state’s dairy farmers. She considers these to be her greatest professional accomplishments to date.Tracey Troutman, outreach and recruitment branch chief for the Office of Outreach, Diversity and Equal Opportunity within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Tracey D. Troutman, who graduated with her bachelor’s degree in avian biology in 2007 and her master’s degree in agricultural leadership in 2008, serves as outreach and recruitment branch chief for the Office of Outreach, Diversity and Equal Opportunity within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS).Troutman leads ARS’s outreach and recruitment initiatives, which include student employment and partnerships to recruit and retain the most talented students. She makes a point to be mindfully inclusive of traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. Troutman made strides toward meeting USDA’s recruitment goals by establishing the department’s student intern workshop, tripling the size of student programs under her direction.For more information about how CAES alumni shape the world, visit alumni.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Champlain scholarship aimed at new magnet school students

first_imgA celebration of two new elementary schools focusing on sustainability and the arts in Burlington was highlighted today with the announcement of dual Champlain College scholarships aimed at helping graduates of the magnet schools attend college.The Holly and Bob Miller Magnet School Scholarship for the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes and The Lois McClure Magnet School Scholarship for the Integrated Arts Academy  at H.O. Wheeler were established earlier this year by Champlain College to honor the Millers and Mrs. McClure for their community support of continuing education. The need-based scholarships will provide up to $20,000 a year in tuition expenses for two students who attend Champlain College. The main requirement is attendance at one of the magnet schools for four years, followed by continued education in Burlington School District schools and graduation from Burlington High School (BHS). The first scholarships will be awarded to members of the BHS Class of 2018.“These scholarships, established as part of honoring these three community leaders with honorary degrees from Champlain College in May, reflect their ongoing support for continuing education for Burlington’s young people,” said Champlain College President David Finney. “The magnet school concept for Burlington will help focus students on their interests, improve student and parent engagement in education and ultimately bring socio-economic integration at the two schools.” “We are so appreciative of the incredible community partners that play an integral part of our new magnet programs, and enhance all of our schools.  We are honored that Champlain College has created this new scholarship program that provides a tremendous opportunity for our students,” noted Burlington School Superintendent Jeanne Collins.A magnet school, according to Victor Prussack, coordinator of the Burlington program, is a public school that offers a specialized program and is open to school children from around the city of Burlington. While there are more than 4,000 elementary magnet schools across the country, these are the first such schools in Vermont. “These dynamic alternative schools were created by the Burlington School District to offer options for children and families who seek a unique learning environment.”Students from all over Burlington as enrolled in the Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler and the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes. Students study the same things as all elementary school children, including literacy, math, science, social studies, art, music, Spanish and physical education. Special programs at both schools integrate community studies outside the classroom and in partnership with organizations such as Shelburne Farms, Flynn Center, Very Merry Theatre Company.The celebration included a parade of students and teachers from both schools down Church Street Marketplace, led by Sambatucada, to the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Vermont. Commissioner of Education Armando Vilaseca and Burlington School Superintendent Collins welcomed the students, parents and community partners to the event and thanked supporters, partners and funders of the new schools. More information about the magnet school program is available at www.bsdvt.org(link is external) or by contacting Victor Prussak at vprussac@bsdvt.org(link sends e-mail).Champlain College, founded in 1878, offers “Education in Three Dimensions” – a distinctive educational approach to professionally focused majors, developing life skills and leadership based on critical and creative thinking. It has nearly 2,000 campus-based undergraduate students on campus and is ranked in the top tier of Best Baccalaureate Colleges in the North by 2009 America’s Best Colleges, published by U.S. News & World Report. To learn more about Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edu(link is external). Source: Champlain College. BURLINGTON, Vt., (Sept. 24, 2009) —last_img read more

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Strong U.S. demand pushes Vestas wind turbine orders well above 2018 levels

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Windpower Monthly:Following its routine end-of-quarter order intake flurry, Vestas reached over 4.6GW of new turbine orders during the second quarter of 2019. On top of the 3GW it won in Q1, Vestas is flying ahead of its 2018 total.In total, Vestas has won a little over 7.61GW of new turbine orders so far in 2019. This total is 40% more than the same period of 2018, when Vestas won 5.44GW on its way to securing 14.2GW across all of 2018.This means Vestas is already over halfway to last year’s total, in a market where many deals are agreed in the final six months of the year. In 2018, 62% of Vestas’ orders were awarded in the second half of the year.As with 2018, the U.S. remained the dominant market for Vestas. It secured 11 deals across the first six months of the year totaling 3,072MW ranging from 143MW to a 459MW deal with PacifiCorp.More: Vestas orders up 40% in first half of 2019 Strong U.S. demand pushes Vestas wind turbine orders well above 2018 levelslast_img read more

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Bolivia Seizes Cocaine Impregnated into Paper

first_imgBy Dialogo February 13, 2012 The Bolivian anti-narcotics police seized 400 kg of liquid cocaine ingeniously hidden in a shipment of charcoal that had Europe as its final destination, with intermediate stops in Chile and Panama. The “highly pure cocaine” was contained in 6,400 bags that were going to be transported to the Chilean port of Arica in two containers, Colonel Gonzalo Quezada, director of the Special Force for the Fight against Drug Trafficking (Felcn), announced in Santa Cruz, the region where the seizure was made. The drug traffickers, “in a very sophisticated chemical process, impregnated the cocaine into kraft paper; the kraft paper (of each of the 6,400 bags) was contaminated with approximately 60 grams” of liquid cocaine, the police chief noted. Another source with knowledge of the investigation, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that “the investor is believed to be a Colombian; that person has not yet been identified; investigations are underway; work is being done in coordination with the special forces for the fight against drug trafficking in our neighboring countries, such as Chile, basically, and Brazil.” Two executives of the firm, which operated legally in Bolivia, are under arrest. Congratulations on the excellent cocaine bust, and may this battle against organized crime will end successfully. Latin American governments routinely fail to manage the Cocaine problem because they focus on the short-term seizure strategies. These strategies are good PR, but not for long-term success in the war on drugs. Demand remains constant. The more Cocain seized triggers an increase in supply, and profits. Cocaine mules detained with small shipments predominantly traffic on credit and cancel the debt with the trafficker once they sell the product in the market. If they lose the product, they generally go back to the trafficker and ask for more credit (more Cocaine) and traffic double quantities to cancel the initial debt. Its a snow ball effect. In Uruguay for example, the banking, financial and legal systems provide the perfect vehicle to invest drug money and guarantee anonymity of investor. Uruguayan shell companies buy goods from Europe with the proceeds of Cocaine trafficking; goods arrive in the free trade zone in Montevideo, are placed in new containers and are sent back and sold to Europe to launder the money through shell companies. Usually all owned by the same fund. How do they get away with it? The US lawyer that regularly sets up shell companies for Uruguayan financial advisors, Marcos Rojas, was a key note speaker at the 2011 Anti Money Laundering Compliance Conference sponsored by Florida. His lecture was titled ¨what is the difference betwen money laundering and a good financial plan¨ Talk about a gamekeeper turned poacher. Bolivia is an even bigger disaster. The tone and policies at the very top encourage the popularity and permanence of the Cocaine industry. So- called businessmen in Bolivia are also deeply involved in the narcotics industry. Ismael Maldonado of Tarija, for example, is widely known in Bolivia and Argentina for his Cocaine trafficking activity. Through Cocaine trafficking, Maldonado has become so strong financially that he has bought significant high level patronage and support/protection. He has a team of lawyers constantly fighting investigations and warding off convictions with technical objections. For example, the Bolivian public prosecutor and the police anti drugs unit conducted investigations against Maldonado for illicit earnings. The investigation was suspended only when Maldonado´s lawyers heard and fought to identify technicalities to suspend the investigation. Prior to the Bolivian government expelling the DEA in 2009, Maldonado was the subject of a Cocaine trafficking and money laundering investigation and he was also the subject of cross border trafficking investigations with Argentina and other known traffickers Kim Yong Soon and Miguel Busanich. There are many others. BUt each and every time, he escapes conviction. Maldonado launders the proceeds of this activity through his 26 stores called Fair Play where he sells athletic equiment and clothing. In Santa Cruz alone there are 4 identical stores within a 200m square box. Two of the stores are next door to each other. This configuration creates the volume of businesses to launder the proceeds of Cocaine trafficking activity. It is called a smurf approach, where by large amounts of money is broken down into small unnoticeable amounts and washed through bank and corporate structures. This way, the magnitude of the issue goes unnoticed. But this is not an isolated example of Uruguay or Bolivia. It is sadly common practice and sucess will only be achieved once a paradign shift is seen in the strategies targeting those responsible. *submitted by a former Intelligence community official that spent 8 years targeting Cocaine networks in Latin America trying desperately to convince Latin Governments to adopt longer-term disciplined strategies to target the real issue – the high value individuals behind the industry.last_img read more

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Family section takes new tack to support gay adoptions

first_img March 1, 2005 Senior Editor Regular News Family section takes new tack to support gay adoptions Family section takes new tack to support gay adoptions The bill would not strike the ban, but would skirt the law for gay foster parents Jan Pudlow Senior Editor The Florida Bar’s Family Law Section Executive Council has unanimously voted to support a bill that would allow gay foster parents to adopt if it is in the best interest of the child.Family Law Section Chair Evan Marks said it is his “hope and prayer that the Board of Governors will recognize the insanity of not allowing people who are already fostering these children” to give them permanent homes. Marks said he believes this issue is much less potentially divisive than his original failed request to lobby for the repeal of the gay adoption ban.“What inspired it is the sheer injustice of these good people who have given so much to these children and cannot adopt,” Marks said of the bill.There is no mention of sexual orientation in HB 633, with bi-partisan support among its co-sponsors: Rep. Sheri McInvale, D-Orlando, and Rep. Faye Culp, R-Tampa.But the first line of the bill says “notwithstanding §63.042″ — referring to Florida’s law banning gay adoption. Marks worked with McInvale in his personal capacity as an individual lawyer to help craft the bill.In December, with a 31-13 vote, Marks lost an impassioned request before the Board of Governors to allow the Family Law, Equal Opportunities Law, and Public Interest Law sections to lobby for the repeal of the state law banning homosexuals from adopting. The majority of governors were persuaded to reject Marks’ plea because of a Bar rule that says if an issue “carries the potential for deep philosophical or emotional division among a substantial segment of the membership,” the section cannot be allowed to lobby for it.But Marks stresses HB 633 does not seek to repeal Florida’s ban on gay adoptions, and he is only asking the board for permission for the section to support a bill that has already been filed.“Everyone agrees that the prejudicial, bigoted language of the statute (gay adoption ban) written as the result of the Anita Bryant days should not and could not stand. However, because of our political climate, there is a very small likelihood of success,” Marks said. “Nobody wants to touch it. Everybody recognizes the problem, and the first thing we can do is allow foster parents to adopt. While it doesn’t solve the problem, it is certainly a step in the right direction.”Of 42,000 foster children in Florida, many are currently cared for by gay and lesbian couples who are doing a great job and are paid by the state, according to Marks.“A lot of these children are not adoptable. They are too old. They have illnesses. Many are HIV positive. As a result, they are fortunate to be in foster care with foster parents who are good, qualified, and loving,” Marks said.“However, these same foster parents can’t adopt, and that’s wrong.”HB 633 says a foster parent who has cared for a child for 36 months or more is eligible to adopt, and should be given first consideration by the court, if the foster parent has developed a bond with the child, has an excellent record of foster parenting with the child, and it is in the best interest of the child, among other factors.McInvale told the Tallahassee Democrat: “Our law says you’re a good enough foster parent to take a kid in state custody, but you’re not a good enough parent for an adoption. This is a wrong that needs to be righted, after the [U.S.] Supreme Court refused to hear the Florida case in a challenge to the state law, because all of the plaintiffs in that case were foster parents.”Culp said she agreed to co-sponsor the bill because, “It’s still going to be up to a judge.”In the Senate, Sen. Nan Rich, D-Weston, filed a bill that is similar — SB 1534 — but will not require foster children to live 36 months with the foster parent because bonding can occur sooner. Her bill, she said, provides a two-prong test for judges: Determining by clear and convincing evidence that the petitioning adults are the child’s “parental figures” and if adoption is better for the child than continuing in foster care.Marks said he sees “a great, great potential for this law to pass and be signed into law.”As chair of the Family Law Section, he wants permission from the Bar to lobby legislators.“I truly believe that the Board of Governors is made up of well-meaning people who are hardworking, volunteering their time in an effort to make The Florida Bar a great place to be,” Marks said.“I believe, on this issue, the lack of information and education allowed good people to fall back on the way they were raised and their emotional beliefs, which have prevented some of them from looking at the big picture. I do believe, in reflecting on this issue, that many of the people of the Board of Governors have had a change of heart.. . . This gives me a good feeling of hope. I feel inspired. I feel my efforts should be redoubled. I have to tell you that, on behalf of the section, I want to work within the Bar to use the prestige and honor of the Bar, to be bold enough and courageous enough to take a difficult position for the right thing.”last_img read more

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Nussle pushes back against Iowa bill to raise CU taxes

first_img continue reading » 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle wrote to the members of the Iowa State Senate Wednesday to urge it to reject a bill that would place additional taxes on credit unions. CUNA has been working closely with the Iowa Credit Union League as bank attacks have ramped up in the state, and will continue its advocacy on a state level to work against the bill, S.S.B. 3197.“Simply put: this legislation would raise taxes on Iowa credit union members and reduce taxes on banks and their stockholders, many of whom do not live in the state,” Nussle wrote. “It would make it more expensive for Iowans to access safe and affordable credit provided by not-for-profit financial cooperatives. This legislation is bad for Iowa and we urge this body to soundly reject it.”Nussle, a native Iowan who represented the state in the U.S. House from 1991 to 2007, noted if S.S.B. 3197 is enacted, noted that credit unions make up only fourteen percent of the state’s financial market and the competition they provide for-profit banks creates a less predatory environment for Iowans and keeps bank fees from getting even more outrageous.last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Sunday, March 10

first_imgWhen Trump released his list of judges for consideration to the Supreme Court, it was all over for Hillary Clinton.Roe v. Wade was a mistake. Change is coming thanks to President Trump.Rather than bemoan the president’s human foibles, let us thank God we live in this country, celebrate Americanism and proudly march in the Fourth of July parades. We’ll send a message to any foreign intruder that you can try but Americans don’t bite.Mary B. McClaineSchenectady As the chairman of the Niskayuna Town Board Economic Development Committee, I’m concerned about the supervisor’s comments. The O.D. Heck facility is still occupied by state employees. If the state decides to turn over a small portion of the property for reuse, the excess parcel will not be “a large swatch of land.”  This section of state land bordering Balltown Road contains a pond that must be protected. Redevelopment would be disallowed under federal and state wetland protection laws.  If the state makes excess land and buildings available for reuse, the zoning change being considered by the Planning Board does not allow for light industrial uses. This area of the Niskayuna is not appropriate for manufacturing facilities. There’s been a lot of misinformation put out about the O.D. Heck property. The state still occupies the vast majority of the site. Any redevelopment at the site must be done responsibly. To suggest there is a lot of property ready to go on the tax rolls for industrial or other commercial uses is incorrect.If any portion of O.D. Heck becomes available, priority one should be responsible development supporting the environment and in sync with nearby neighborhoods.John DellaRattaNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccine O.D. Heck land needs responsible review In The Gazette profile of the Niskayuna town supervisor (and subsequent interview on her brother’s television program), Yasmine Syed said rezoning the O.D. Heck property to expand the tax base is “priority one.”She went on to refer to the property as a “large swatch of land” she favors to be rezoned as “light industrial.”center_img Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionVoters didn’t need Russia to back TrumpIf in fact there was Russian influence during the 2016 presidential election, it didn’t affect the outcome.Americans knew how they would cast their vote when they saw candidate Trump come down the escalator in Trump Tower to announce his candidacy. No one had to ask, “Who is this person?” He already had name recognition.Throughout the campaign, specific blocs of people publicly declared their support for Trump. One such group was the “Bikers for Trump.” I attended the bikers’ rally held in Schenectady. Believe me, no attendee was going to be influenced by any country, anybody or anything. They knew candidate Trump was the right person for the times.Don’t underestimate the power of the thousands of voters who spent their professional lives holding a secret clearance. They understood the seriousness of Hillary’s private server. Clinton was her own worst enemy. What was that about Russian influence?Also consider the Evangelicals, Fox News viewers and the Rush Limbaugh radio listeners. Is anyone so naive to think the Russians could influence such a conservative bloc of voters?last_img read more

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Millions of freelancers, entrepreneurs hit by pandemic with no safety net, government aid

first_imgTopics : Research by the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) in collaboration with the University of Indonesia (UI) and the Manpower Ministry involving 2,160 participants with different jobs, found that 55 percent of freelancers respondents reported that they had lost their jobs, while 58 percent had no income due to the health crisis. Meanwhile, 38 percent of the freelancer respondents had fewer jobs, while 28 percent reported a declining income. The survey also revealed how the outbreak had battered entrepreneurs, as 52 percent of self-employed respondents reported a decline in production activity and income. Meanwhile, 40 percent of them had halted business activity altogether.Read also: Freelance workers sell belongings to survive amid COVID-19 outbreakZainul Hidayat, a researcher at UI’s demography center at the School of Economics and Business, said on May 20 that if the survey results were simulated to the national figure, an estimated 10 million self-employed people had stopped working and 15 million freelancers had become jobless due to the pandemic. Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data show that more than 56 percent of employed Indonesians or around 74.03 million people worked in informal sectors, which included freelancers and entrepreneurs, in February.“If the pandemic continues for the next two months, these self-employed workers will find it harder to run their businesses, while many more freelancers will also be without an income,” he said.He said self-employed workers and freelancers might survive on their own until June but he said the government should provide social aid and other incentives to help them survive.Previously, media and creative workers union Sindikasi stated that freelancers, in general, were extremely vulnerable during economic downturns, as they had no social security from their clients and clients could cut off their contracts without any compensation, while the government’s aid did not target them.The government has allocated Rp 677.20 trillion (US$48.58 billion) to fight the COVID-19 outbreak, with Rp 203.90 trillion allocated for social aid through the Family Hope Program, staple food assistance, preemployment card and electricity discounts, among other things, for low-income people.As much as Rp 123.46 trillion has been allocated for micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) incentives and Rp 120.61 trillion in tax incentives for businesses.The research also found that only 41 percent of employers surveyed said they could survive for the next three months under current conditions, while 24 percent said they could survive for up to six months, 11 percent for six to 12 months and 24 percent more than 12 months.During the pandemic, 13.9 percent of the employers had laid off workers, while 49.6 respondents had furloughed employees.  Read also: Indonesia unveils bigger stimulus worth $47.6 billion to fight coronavirus impactsAs many as 2.8 million people have already lost their jobs or were sent on paid or unpaid leave as of April 13, according to data from the Manpower Ministry and the Workers Social Security Agency (BPJS Ketenagakerjaan).Amanda Anindita, a Surabaya-based wedding and couples photographer, has seen declining work opportunities and revenue during the outbreak but she continues to look for work.  “The pandemic has had a big impact on the wedding and event-related business. Many clients have decided to postpone their wedding events following the imposition of PSBB [large-scale social restrictions],” said Amanda, who has built a photography business with her colleagues, on May 27. She feels the pressure to be creative in finding new opportunities as she cannot rely on her main business anymore.“Commercial opportunities still come to me and I can learn new skills during this time,” she said. “Recently I tried to hold a virtual photo shoot and surprisingly there are people who want to use my skills commercially for such a photo shoot.”  Freelancers and entrepreneurs are among those who have been hit hard by the COVID-19 outbreak, many of whom are reporting income losses and declining activity, with no safety net or government aid in place to soften the fall. David Rahman, 27, a freelance music teacher, is generating no income after all learning activities were moved online in March. “It is impossible to teach music online because students do not have their own musical instruments at home. Many music competitions for students were canceled, so the schools stopped music courses just like that,” David told The Jakarta Post on May 27. center_img Before the pandemic, David earned an income by teaching music once a week at eight schools, ranging from elementary to junior high schools in Jakarta.Read also: What about the others? ‘Ojol’ relief sparks concerns over aid inequality“Since I’m not teaching anymore, I’m not getting paid either,” he added. Today, he is temporarily jobless and relying only on his savings to survive as finding other freelance jobs in music is also difficult at the time.The COVID-19 outbreak has disrupted business activity, forcing offices and factories, as well as schools and entertainment centers to shut their doors as people stay home to contain the coronavirus spread. As a result, millions of people have lost their jobs.last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Commission for Women Statement on House Bill 1948

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Statement,  Women’s Rights Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Commission for Women issued the following statement on House Bill 1948, which was passed by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives last week by a vote of 132-65, further restricting a woman’s right to and ability to receive an abortion in Pennsylvania:“The Pennsylvania Commission for Women has serious concerns with the process by which House Bill 1948 was voted on and passed by the PA House of Representatives. This bill was brought to a vote without a hearing and without receiving input from medical professionals or organizations in the Commonwealth. If this bill becomes law, it would be one of the most restrictive abortion bills in the country. The Commission feels strongly that any changes to abortion laws that impact women to this degree should not occur without a robust discussion that includes input from both the healthcare community in Pennsylvania as well as the public, particularly Pennsylvania women.“The Commission for Women will continue to follow the path of this bill in the Pennsylvania General Assembly and will provide further analysis and information as the process moves forward in order to keep Pennsylvania women, and all Pennsylvanians, informed.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Pennsylvania Commission for Women Statement on House Bill 1948center_img June 28, 2016last_img read more

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