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Wiggin EU regulation roundup – August 2019

first_imgBingo Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Bingo Poker Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Wiggin EU regulation roundup – August 2019center_img In conjunction with Chris Elliott and Beth French of Wiggin LLP, iGB provides a regulatory snapshot of igaming across the EU. Denmark, Germany, Norway and the Netherlands are among those updated for this editionAUSTRIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences for sports betting and horse race betting are available for private operators on a regional basis within Austria, whereas poker, casino, bingo and lottery are controlled by the monopoly, Casinos Austria, which has exclusive rights until 2027. Status: The CJEU has held that the Austrian casino monopoly is incompatible with EU law in a number of cases, although national courts continue to reach conflicting decisions on the compatibility of Austria’s current gambling legislative framework with EU law and the position remains unclear. BELGIUM  Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery.} Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider. However, online operators need to partner with a land-based licence holder in order to satisfy a local establishment requirement; alternatively, apply for one of the retail licences that can be extended to cover online. Status: There remain valid arguments that the existing regime is incompatible with Belgium’s EU Treaty obligations. Active enforcement measures against operators and players are in place. On 1 January 2019, a royal decree on the operation of games of chance partially entered into force, introducing restrictions on increases to stake limits. The rest of the provisions, which restrict gambling advertising, entered into effect on 1 June 2019.BULGARIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery (excluding raffles and instant lottery games). Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly. Status: Any operator from an EU/EEA jurisdiction or the Swiss Confederation can apply for a licence. The Bulgarian regulator has awarded approximately 28 licences to date, including to a number of international operators. The government has proposed amendments to the country’s gambling legislation which, among other things, would introduce stringent restrictions on gambling advertising. Active ISP-blocking is in place.CROATIA  Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All products are available to private operators except for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider. Private operators can only be licensed to offer online gambling if they obtain a land-based casino or betting licence. Status: It was understood that Croatia would submit new legislation following its accession to the EU in 2013 but attempts on the Ministry to update its gambling legislation have been subject to similar criticism in respect of EU incompatibility issues (including the requirement that only holders of land-based licences can offer online gambling). Regulatory reforms appear to have stalled in the country. CYPRUS Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: OPAP has a monopoly over lottery operations; sports betting licences are available to private operators. Status: Cyprus regulated online betting in July 2012, although a licensing regime was not established until 2016. ISPs are obliged to implement blocking measures to prohibit Cypriot residents from accessing unlicensed gambling websites. A new betting law, which entered into force in March 2019, replaces the 2012 Betting Law. The provisions of the new law are substantially the same, with minor amends introduced to address EU incompatibility concerns under the previous law (such as the requirement to have a local branch in order to obtain a sports betting licence).  CZECH REPUBLIC Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: EU and EEA-based operators are able to apply for licences. Status: The new gambling regulatory regime entered into force in the Czech Republic on 1 January 2017, allowing EU/EEA companies to enter the market. ISP-blocking measures are active in the jurisdiction. Tax rates are reportedly set to increase to up to 30% of GGR for certain online gambling activities from January 2020.DENMARK Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, fantasy sports, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Sports betting, poker and casino licences are available to private operators. Lottery is controlled by the state monopoly. Status: The Danish online gambling regime went live on 1 January 2012. ISP-blocking measures are active in the jurisdiction and the Danish Gaming Authority has been granted an injunction to block operators and suppliers that have been targeting Danish customers without the requisite licence. As of July 2019, a number of player protection measures are understood to have been introduced including a voluntary code of conduct relating to marketing and requirements for players to set deposit and bonus limits. ESTONIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences for all gambling products are available to private operators save for lotteries, which are reserved exclusively for the monopoly operator. Status: Operators seeking to accept business from players in Estonia must be issued an activity licence for the type of gambling they wish to offer, then an operating permit to provide the services remotely. A blacklist of operators is maintained and updated by local authorities and ISP and payment blocking is in force. Though some operators argue that the regime is still not compatible with EU law, no notification alleging incompatibility has been issued by the EC since the requirement for licensees to main servers in Estonia was removed. FINLAND Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All gambling products are under the exclusive control of monopoly provider Veikkaus Oy. Status: Despite the existence of a national monopoly, EC enforcement action was dropped subsequent to various changes to Finnish laws. Active enforcement measures are in place (restrictive marketing for offshore operators in particular) and the new government is exploring measures to further restrict the offshore supply of gambling services. FRANCE Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can obtain online licences for sports betting, horse race betting and poker. The monopoly has exclusive rights to bingo and lottery. Status: A regulated market since the introduction of a licensing regime in 2010, following which the EC withdrew its infringement proceedings. Law 2019-486, providing for the privatisation of the state-owned operator of France’s national lottery games, Française des Jeux (FDJ), has been published in the French Official Journal. Broader regulatory changes to the online sector expected to follow. GERMANY Regulated gambling products: Schleswig-Holstein, a small northern-German state, regulates sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino and bingo. The other 15 states of Germany currently permit only sports betting and horse race betting. Operator type: Private operators can no longer obtain licences in Schleswig-Holstein under the existing regime, although S-H has approved legislation to reinstate existing licences until 2021 (with operations allowed to continue in the interim). S-H has also introduced a quasi licensing regime for sports betting (intended to be of a transitional nature). In the other 15 states, horse race betting licences are available at a regional level but the position surrounding the 20 available sports-betting licences is still uncertain pending the ratification of the 3rd Amendment Treaty. Status: The main legal framework for gambling regulation in Germany has been the subject of much debate and has been heavily criticised by the EC and interested parties/states within Germany for a number of years. Discussions to reform the existing legislation have resulted in the approval of the 3rd Amendment Treaty on 21 March 2019. The Amendment proposes to remove the limit on the number of sports betting licences and re-introduce a sports betting process. The ban on online casino will remain in place, although there is an exception to the prohibition for S-H. The Amendment still needs to be ratified by each German state by 31 December 2019 before it can become binding law across Germany. The German state of Lower Saxony has taken steps to prevent PSPs from facilitating transactions between German players and online casino operators, and further enforcement action appears likely. GREAT BRITAIN Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: All licences are available to private operators save for lottery, which is reserved exclusively for the monopoly provider, Camelot. Status: Any operator that transacts with, or advertises to, British residents requires a licence from the Gambling Commission. Licensed operators are required to source gambling software from commission-licensed businesses. Remote Gaming Duty has been increased to cover a shortfall in lost tax revenue resulting from a reduction in maximum stakes on fixed odds betting terminals from £100 to £2. Both changes took effect 1 April 2019. GREECE Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: All products are exclusively reserved for the monopoly providers, although 24 transitional licences for private operators remain active, with all products permitted. Status: The enabling regulations that implement a Greek online gambling licensing regime are yet to be implemented. In 2012, a ‘transition period’ commenced, whereby the Greek government granted 24 transitional licences to operators, enabling them to keep transacting with Greek residents. The Government has submitted draft amendments to the country’s Gambling Law to the EC approval which, if implemented as proposed, will introduce an open licensing regime for online sports betting, live casino and peer-to-peer poker. The right to permit RNG-based casino games has been reserved to the Ministry of Finance (on recommendation of the Hellenic Gaming Commission). HUNGARY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Only the state monopolies (Szerencsejáték Zrt. and Magyar Lóversenyfogadást-Szervezo Kft) and local concession companies can apply for a licence. Status: Amendments to Hungarian gambling law came into force on 1 October 2015 and allow only two land-based casinos to hold remote casino concessions. The regulator has since issued fines, a number of which have been challenged, against unlicensed operators that continue to target the market. In June 2017, the ECJ determined Hungary’s gambling regime to be incompatible with Article 56 TFEU. A subsequent ECJ decision in February 2018 ruled against the Hungarian requirement that online gambling operators must have a land-based licence to offer online gambling services to Hungarian citizens, further strengthening arguments that the current regime is incompatible with EU law. The Hungarian Ministry of Justice has stated its intention to continue to seek to enforce the existing regime despite the most recent ruling. A draft bill that would introduce payment-blocking measures was notified to the EC on 15 December 2017, although the bill appears to have stalled. IRELAND Regulated gambling products: Online gaming is not specifically accounted for in Ireland’s outdated legislation and as such is currently unregulated. Operator type: Online betting regulated since August 2015. Status: Ireland has been contemplated updating its legislation, which will create a comprehensive igaming regime, for some time. In April 2019, an inter-departmental working group on the future licensing and regulation of gambling published a report indicating that a reform of Irish betting and gaming laws may finally be going ahead in the near future. Legislative progress is not expected until late 2019 at the earliest. ITALY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Fully regulated market, although lotteries are the subject of a state monopoly. Status: Remote gambling licences are granted within specific application windows. The last tender process for applications closed on 19 March 2018. On 7 August 2018, the Italian parliament approved a decree which prohibits gambling advertising and sponsorship. The ban took effect on 14 July 2018, although ongoing advertising and sponsorship contracts remained valid until the earlier of their expiration date or 14 July 2019. The Italian communications regulator recently released guidelines for the ad ban with the hope of clarifying its scope. LUXEMBOURG Regulated gambling products: Lottery. Operator type: Monopoly. Status: The general prohibition on gambling appears sufficiently wide to cover all forms of online gambling. MALTA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for a local licence (except for lottery products). Status: Malta has approved a new Gaming Act that replaces all existing gaming legislation with a single piece of legislation, supplemented by secondary legislation. The Gaming Act, with directives and regulations, is effective 1 August 2018. NETHERLANDS Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Monopoly for all products. Status: On 19 February 2019, the Dutch parliament approved the Remote Gambling Bill, which will introduce an online gambling licensing regime. It is understood that operators that have directly ‘targeted’ the Dutch market will face a two-year cooling-off period before being eligible for a licence. Implementation of a licensing regime will not likely emerge for some time. In the interim, the regulator is expected to continue to implement enforcement measures against operators targeting Dutch players. NORWAY Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting and lottery. Operator type: Online gambling is reserved for the two monopoly providers, Norsk Tipping and Norsk Rikstoto. Status: The monopoly has extended its offering to include live betting, online bingo and casino games in an attempt to redirect traffic from unlicensed sites. The Norwegian regulator continues to step up enforcement efforts against unregulated operators, local banks and payment service providers. The government has also adopted measures to stem the flow of gambling supply from offshore, including enhanced enforcement powers to prevent gambling advertising from abroad and ISP and payment blocking.POLAND Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, casino and poker. Operator type: Betting licences are available for companies with a representative in Poland. Casino and poker are reserved for a state monopoly. Status: Legislation enacted 1 January 2012 permits betting. Online gaming (including poker) is no longer prohibited as of 1 April 2017, although the exclusive rights to offer such products are reserved for a state monopoly. Provisions that provide for the establishment of a blacklist of unlicensed operators and ISP and payment blocking came into force on 1 July 2017. The blacklist contains more than 1,000 domain names.  PORTUGAL Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Any EU/EEA operator can apply to be granted a licence for online gambling. Lottery games and land-based fixed-odds sports betting remain reserved for a monopoly. Status: A regulated market since 2015. Although operators can now apply for licences, their Portuguese revenue streams are subject to comparatively high tax rates, particularly in sports betting (8-16% tax on turnover). In 2015, the RGA filed a state-aid case with the EC challenging the Portuguese betting tax as breaking EU trade rules. ROMANIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Any operator from an EU/EEA jurisdiction or the Swiss Confederation can apply for a licence. Lottery games remain reserved for the monopoly. Status: The Gambling Law (as amended) introduced a legal framework for a fully regulated online gambling market and requires licences to be held by online gambling operators, as well as software providers, payment processors, affiliates and testing labs. After some delay, the secondary legislation that fully implemented the new licensing regime came into force on 26 February 2016. In December 2018, the Romanian government approved an ordinance which, among other things, introduces a new 2% tax on player deposits for online gambling operators as of 1 January 2019. SLOVAKIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for licences for online casino as of 1 March 2019 and for sports betting licences from 1 July 2019. Lottery and bingo remain reserved for the monopoly provider. Status: A new Gambling Law came into force on 1 March 2019. The Gambling Law allows private operators outside of Slovakia to apply for licences for sports betting and casino, although sports betting licences will not enter into effect until July 2020.SLOVENIA Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Online gambling must be operated by land-based casinos or lotteries and, as a result, only the monopoly holds online licences in Slovenia. Status: Draft amendments to the Gaming Act were published in 2015, which aim to remove the current local establishment requirement. The proposal, which is yet to be submitted to the Slovenian parliament, was expected to be adopted in early 2019. Whether any amendments will introduce a formal licensing system remains unclear.SPAIN Regulated gambling products: Sports betting, horse race betting, poker, casino, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Private operators can apply for licences for all gambling products save for lottery. Status: Operators must hold a general licence and a specific licence, both issued by the National Gambling Commission, for each activity. Remote gambling licences are granted within specific application windows. The last tender process for applications closed on 18 December 2018. The 2018 parliamentary budget was passed into law in June 2018, resulting in a reduction to gambling tax effective as of 1 July 2018. The DGOJ has introduced a number of new player protection initiatives. More stringent restrictions on gambling advertising in the country may take effect in the near future.  SWEDEN Regulated gambling products: Betting (including sports, horse race, pool, exchanges), casino, poker, bingo and lottery. Operator type: Licences are available for private operators. Status: As of 1 January 2019, Sweden is a fully regulated market. All gambling operators that wish to offer their services to Swedish residents will be required to obtain a licence in order to validly do so (either a ‘betting’ licence or a ‘commercial online games’ licence, depending on the product(s) being offered). Active enforcement measures are in place and the Swedish regulator has already issued a number of monetary fines to licensed operators for self-exclusion and marketing failures.WIGGIN is a law firm dedicated to supporting the media, entertainment and gaming sectors. Its market-leading betting and gaming group provides specialist legal services to an array of gambling industry stakeholders. We advise many of the world’s leading gambling operators and suppliers and also enjoy helping entrepreneurial, interactive start-up businesses. If you’d like to hear more, contact us at [email protected] Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Online Gambling 31st July 2019 | By Stephen Carter Regions: Europelast_img read more

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Glasgow to consider proposals for new gambling framework

first_img Regions: UK & Ireland Topics: Legal & compliance Email Address Glasgow City Council is to stage a summit with academics, third sector, health professionals, youth workers and individuals who have suffered with gambling problems in order to examine related challenges in the Scottish city and develop a new framework for action. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Legal & compliance 30th September 2019 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Glasgow City Council is to stage a summit with academics, third sector, health professionals, youth workers and individuals who have suffered with gambling problems in order to examine related challenges in the Scottish city and develop a new framework for action.The plan was approved at a meeting of the Council’s Wellbeing, Empowerment, Community and Citizen Engagement City Policy Committee, where a number of specialist speakers put forward their ideas to reduce gambling harms.The Committee discussed various key factors related to gambling, including the changing landscape of the industry, associated health and financial problems, the rise in popularity of online gaming, increased marketing and advertising spend, and the impact on young people.Following an open debate, the Committee concluded staging a summit would be the most effective course of action, with the aim of developing a whole systems approach to the prevention and treatment of individuals impacted by gambling.Speaking on behalf of the Committee, Councillor Bailie Annette Christie said that Glasgow has a longstanding problem with gambling and as the more traditional approaches are not working, more must be done to tackle related issues.“The gambling sector has changed over recent years and therefore how we tackle the problems that arise from gambling addiction and how it impacts other areas of a person’s life, needs to change too,” Christie said.“We need to treat gambling the same as alcohol and smoking addictions have been treated in the past – as public health problems. We need a new approach and to look at all the different policy areas including health, education, planning, licensing, and financial inclusion that could be used to treat and support people and prevent the harm in the first place.”Other key outcomes from the meeting included a commitment to take steps to learn more about what works in order to limit and prevent harm by exploring best practice examples from across the UK and internationally.The Committee will also advocate for a stronger focus on education and review suitability of educational activities and programmes, as well as review support available to council staff to take account of online gambling and ensure those who are at risk of, or are experiencing gambling harms can to access help.Meanwhile, the Committee also called for closer work with partners to ensure appropriate care pathways that meet the needs of users, and to consider the actions required to facilitate partnership working across a range of agencies to explore the further development.In addition, the Committee said both the Council and Licensing Board should continue to work with the GB Gambling Commission, as well as the Scottish and UK Governments, to look at what more could be done to counteract the impact of clustering of environmental harms.Image: Barnabas Csomor Glasgow to consider proposals for new gambling frameworklast_img read more

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Bet-at-home revenue down in Q3 despite sports-heavy period

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 9th November 2020 | By Robin Harrison AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Betting and gaming levies for the period came to €16.1m, and after €3.4m in value added tax (VAT), net revenue for the nine months came to €73.5m, down 16.4%.  Betclic Everest Group subsidiary Bet-at-home said the summer’s packed sporting schedule positively impacted its performance in the third quarter, though revenue for the year to date remains below 2019 levels. Tags: Bet-at-home This came on total stakes of €636.1m for the third quarter alone, and €2.10bn for the nine-month period (a 13.9% decline). Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Online casino Q3 results 2020 Online sports betting While online gaming was not impacted by the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, it reported a drop in revenue as a result of tighter regulatory controls, which forced the operator to withdraw from the Swiss market in 2019.  However, this is likely to decline in 2021, it warned, as a result of regulatory conditions imposed for Germany’s online sports betting and casino markets.  Bet-at-home revenue down in Q3 despite sports-heavy period After €1.5m in amortisation and depreciation charges, earnings before interest and tax were down 15.6% at €21.6m. While €72,000 in financial outgoings saw pre-tax profit fall to €21.5m, a 64.2% drop in income taxes, to €7.1m, resulted in net profit for the nine months to 30 September increase sharply, to €14.4m.  Email Address It received a sports betting licence from the Regional Council of Darmstadt last week, and can take advantage of a transition period in which the business can offer heavily restricted forms of slots and poker. center_img Looking ahead, the operator said that while it remains on track to generate between €120m and €132m for the 2020 calendar year, and EBITDA of between €23m and €27m.  Bet-at-home noted that it has removed table games and implemented the €1,000 limit for the casino products by the 15 October deadline, as it aims to secure a licence once the Glücksspielneuregulierungstaatsvertrag (GlüNeuRStV) comes into force from July 2021. Revenue for the nine months to 30 September came to €93.0m (£84.0m/$110.6m), down 12.9% year-on-year. Based on the first half revenue of €62.3m, this suggested the operator generated €30.7m in the three months to 30 September.  This will require operators to limit customer spending to €1,000 per month, with limited scope to offer a small number of sportsbook customers higher limits of €10,000 or €30,000.  “This significantly increased legal certainty for business operations in Germany, however, means that, from the current perspective, the management board for the Bet-at-home.com expects a decline in gross betting and gaming revenue of around €20m in the financial year 2021, compared to the financial year 2020.”  However the sporting cancellations in the first half saw both stakes and revenue for betting fall year-on-year, with customers wagering €303.9m and winning €269.5m, for gross revenue of €34.4m, a 21.1% drop.  “From today’s perspective, this results in a decrease in EBITDA of around €13m in the financial year 2021.” Regions: Central and Eastern Europe Western Europe Germany Austria Q3 results 2020 This contributed to amounts wagered on casino, live dealer games, and virtual sports falling 12.4% to €1.79bn, which after customer winnings left gross revenue of €58.6m.  Looking at performance by vertical, Bet-at-home said that it benefitted by a number of major sporting events taking place in the third quarter, in what had traditionally been a quieter period for the business.  Bet-at-home recorded €1.1m in additional income, while personnel expenses for the period rose to €14.6m. While marketing costs were down 27.1% at €21.4m, and other operating expenses fell to €15.6m, the decline in revenue resulted in earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) fell 14.6% to €23.0m. last_img read more

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Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) Q32011 Interim Report

first_imgBychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2011 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu)  2011 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileBychemex Limited is a subsidiary of Harel Mallac & Co. Limited and specialises in the manufacturing and sale of specialized chemical products and auxiliaries for the textile industry in Mauritius. Bychemex Limited handles its operations through the segments of textile auxiliaries, bleaching and dyeing chemicals, and scouring chemicals, where the company produces detergents, wetting agents, anti-crease agents, sequestrates, dispersants, and softeners, hydrogen peroxide, brine solution and caustic solutions. Bychemex Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius’ Development and Enterprise Market.last_img read more

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Red Nose Day 2005 launched

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 1 February 2005 | News In 2003 Sainsbury’s customers and staff raised £6.3 million for Comic Relief. Tagged with: Digital Events As usual the campaign will be supported by a music single. This year McFly will release their double A-side Comic Relief single All About You/You’ve Got a Friend on 7 March.The event has considerable commercial sector support from retailers such as TK Maxx and Sainsbury’s. The latter is encouraging its customers to donate in four ways: by buying products from which a percentage of the sale price will be donated to the appeal. These include New Covent Garden Comic Relief Squished Tomato Soup. The supermarket has even published a handy shopping list of Comic Relief items and how much each will earn for the charity: the list can be downloaded from its website.by buying this year’s Red Nose, or Clothes Nose (a badge) and Car Air Freshener, which are available only from Sainsbury’s and Oxfam. This year’s Red Nose includes face paints, red hair gel and fun stickers, with a 70p donation going straight to Comic Relief.by using Sainsbury’s ‘Save-back’ facility, a charitable version of ‘cash-back’ whereby, when paying by debit card, shoppers can ask for a fixed amount to be added to their bill at the checkout or they can round up their bill to the nearest £5. The donation will then be swiped into the Comic Relief donation account. Donors will be given a receipt confirming the amount they have donated.by donating online at the rednoseday.com website Red Nose Day 2005 launched  104 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Comic Relief’s major fundraising event will take place on 11 March 2005 with a seven-hour telethon, with the theme “Big Hair and Beyond”.Davina McCall, Matt Lucas and Chris Evans were among the comedians and celebrities who launched this year’s Comic Relief campaign in central London.The theme of this year’s Comic Relief campaign is “Big Hair and Beyond”. In addition to buying red noses, supporters will be asked to change the way they look to raise money. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Scope launches phone and printer cartridge recycling appeal

first_img  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The charity is also asking businesses to support it by regularly donating used cartridges or phones. Individuals who want to get involved can request a Freepost envelope from the Recycling Appeal. Scope launches phone and printer cartridge recycling appeal AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 11 May 2005 | Newscenter_img Disability organisation Scope has launched a recycling campaign to raise funds. The Recycling Appeal, the charity recycling specialists, is working with all 300 Scope shops to raise money for the charity through donations of mobile phones and printer cartridges.George Eracleous, Scope Recycling Manager, said: “There are an estimated 90 million redundant mobile phones in cupboards and drawers across the UK – enough to stretch along the Great Wall of China more than five times!Phones are worth, on average, £2.50 and cartridges are worth 90p for Scope. Advertisement Tagged with: Trading About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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BHF’s Love Installations are art for heart’s sake

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5 BHF’s Love Installations are art for heart’s sake The installations were created after research revealed that 86% of Londoners surveyed said that they preferred romantic gestures rather than expensive gifts. A quarter of them said that a love letter or poem was the perfect way to their heart.Polly Shute, Fundraising Project Director, The British Heart Foundation explained: “It appears there is a real appetite for genuine and meaningful gestures of love this Valentine’s Day and Love Installations successfully taps into this while helping us to continue our life-saving work.” Chris Norman, Strategy Director at The Good Agency added: “We believe the best way to engage new audiences is through something interactive that allows them to express themselves in an emotional way. Where texts, emails and tweets are intangible and disposable we wanted to create something that references a time when love had an element of permanency”.The BHF is encouraging supporters to share their experiences at the Love Installations on Twitter with the hashtag #BHFLove.www.bhf.org.uk/nationalheartmonth Howard Lake | 4 February 2013 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  106 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5 The British Heart Foundation (BHF) has unveiled two large heart-themed art installations in London’s Covent Garden and Camden Lock with a combined education and fundraising aim.Working with The Good Agency, BHF’s ‘Love Installations’ mark National Heart Month. They consist of giant L.O.V.E and Heart sculptures made of galvanised steel, both over 2 metres high. The charity is encouraging people to make public declarations of love at the art works from 1 to 17 February. In return for a suggested minimum donation of £3, they can write a message on a heart-shaped fob and then attach it with a red lock to one of the sculptures. Advertisementlast_img read more

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ICAP’s global Charity Day 2018 raises £4.5m

first_imgDani Dyer at ICAP Charity Day 2018  176 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis26 Chiwetel Ejiofor at ICAP Charity Day 2018 ICAP, part of TP ICAP group, the world’s largest inter-dealer broker, has raised £4.5 million for charities in one day, with some help from some very well-known faces. Its 26th annual global Charity Day was held this week.Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Cornwall, Chiwetel Ejiofor and Michael Douglas joined ICAP to raise money for over 100 charities across the globe.Some celebrities joined the campaign in London while others, including actors Michael Douglas and Forest Whitaker, joined employees in New York to raise money. The global event took place across 18 ICAP offices, with 100% of ICAP’s revenues and brokers’ commissions donated directly to charitable causes.Nicolas Breteau, Group Chief Executive Officer, TP ICAP, said: “I am delighted that this year’s ICAP Charity Day raised £4.5 million, bringing the total amount raised to almost £145 million since the first Charity Day in 1993.”UK charity beneficiariesIn the UK, 17 charitable organisations will benefit from ICAP Charity Day this year. These include The Silver Line, Rainbow Trust, National Literacy Trust, and Children & The Arts. Howard Lake | 7 December 2018 | News HRH Duchess of Cornwall at ICAP Charity Day 2018 Suki Waterhouse at ICAP Charity Day 2018 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Keith Lemon at ICAP Charity Day 2018 Tagged with: Celebrity corporate donated services fundraising events  175 total views,  1 views today Advertisement ICAP’s global Charity Day 2018 raises £4.5mlast_img read more

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TCU cuts online course tuition for the fall

first_img Previous articleTCU to research its history with racism, slavery and the ConfederacyNext articleFormer employee wants TCU records on past discrimination claims Renee Umsted RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history ReddIt Renee is a journalism major. She is dedicated to improving her journalism skills to effectively and ethically inform others. TCU 360 staff win awards at the Fall National College Media Convention Twitter printStudents taking online classes in the fall can expect a 10% discount per course. Chancellor Victor Boschini announced the change Wednesday in an email to members of the TCU community and during a Zoom town hall with faculty and staff.Faculty Senate Chair Sean Atkinson and Staff Assembly Chair Angie Taylor asked Boschini questions submitted by faculty and staff during the conversation.Finances In the email, sent prior to the town hall, Boschini said the board of trustees met this week and approved spending additional $50 million in financial aid to students for the fall semester. The board also approved spending up to $15 million for students who qualify for need-based aid. In the town hall meeting, Boschini said students would receive a 10% increase in aid for each online course. If all students have to move to distance learning, the aid will be extended to those who had in-person classes as well. “What I think it will show the parents is that we’re trying to work with them.”Chancellor Victor BoschiniThe money for this aid is coming from a loan secured in the spring to cover payroll if needed, Boschini said. He added that he did not want to use this money, but is doing so to show that he is listening to faculty and staff concerned about a lack of shared governance.As of the meeting, the university is not planning on any furloughs or layoffs. However, the chancellor listed four factors that might change this decision: The outcome of the first due date for tuition payments. Whether there are sports in the fall.Whether classes mover to online only in the fall. Whether classes are online only in the spring.Boschini said the university is still not planning on taking any of the $5.2 million TCU qualifies for through the CARES Act. Health Although TCU requires everyone on campus to wear face coverings inside, Atkinson said some faculty and staff members are concerned students or other community members showing “reckless behavior” may refuse.If that happens, the chancellor said he would use peer pressure to encourage students to social distance or wear masks. For example, if a student is not wearing a mask in his class, Boschini said he would would not teach until the student adheres or leaves the classroom. “It’s my opinion that in 99% of the times, they’ll conform, because the rest of the kids in that class, they want to be in there,” Boschini said. Atkinson said faculty and staff are concerned because mask wearing has become a politicized issue in the U.S. “I know there’s no easy answer to that, but I wonder if there’s a way we can better promote a message of safety,” Atkinson said. In addition to implementing policies to help prevent the spread of the virus, TCU is developing spaces and procedures to follow when people become infected. Boschini said the decision to transition to fully online course delivery will be based on guidance from local health officials as well as the amount of quarantine spaces available. “We all just have to get used to living with a little bit more risk,” Boschini said. Campus experience Two of the most discussed topics during the meeting were athletics and the academic experience. Not only are sports and in-person classes among the top money generators for the university, but they are also key to the TCU experience.The Amon G. Carter Stadium. (Photo by Heesoo Yang.)The chancellor said he is open to having football games without fans because the university would still receive television revenue, and not having sports would cost TCU about $40 million. But Boschini noted the emotional toll this would take on the community. “Let’s be honest, that’s a big part of fall,” he said. Limiting attendance at games while social distancing was discussed, but Boschini said he was worried students would not keep apart from each other. In the meeting, Atkinson asked instructors to reach out to students to inform them of their plans for the semester. “Just because we’re online or in a physically distanced classroom, the high quality of a TCU education isn’t going to be compromised, and I think we all agree on that point,” Atkinson said. Initiative to study TCU’s history In an email to the campus community sent Wednesday morning, the chancellor and the chairman of the board announced an initiative to study TCU’s history involving racism, slavery and the Confederacy. The group tasked with taking on this project will include students, faculty, staff, alumni and trustees. Boschini said this kind of investigation has not occurred during his time as chancellor. When asked what actionable steps the university would take, Boschini said he didn’t know. “What concrete steps will come from that? I don’t know yet. But that’s part of the reason you do it,” Boschini said. + posts Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umsted Jacqueline Lambiase is still fighting for students World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution ‘Horned Frogs lead the way’: A look at TCU’s ROTC programs Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Students are now able to apply to the scholarship search (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer) Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ ReddIt Twitter Linkedin Facebook Facebook Linkedin TCU will not raise tuition for the 2021-22 academic year Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/last_img read more

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Michoacán newspaper editor kidnapped and killed

first_img to go further Help by sharing this information MexicoAmericas Organisation May 5, 2021 Find out more RSF_en MexicoAmericas Reporters Without Borders is appalled by the abduction and murder of Miguel Angel Villa Gómez Valle, the editor of Noticias de Michoacán, a daily newspaper based in Lázaro Cárdenas, in the southwestern state of Michoacán. Villa Gómez’s bullet-riddled body was found yesterday morning in a refuse dump, less than 12 hours after he went missing.“The list of kidnappings and execution-style killings of journalists continues to grow longer in areas of Mexico where organised crime is well-established,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Our thoughts go out to the victim’s family and colleagues, whose grief will only be compounded if this murder goes unpunished.The press freedom organisation added: “It is vital that the special prosecutor’s office for crimes of violence against journalists should have an immediate say in this investigation.”The police found Villa Gómez’s body in a road-side refuse dump about 50 km outside Lázaro Cárdenas. He had been shot twice in the stomach and once in the head. Relatives told Agence France-Presse that he left his office at about 10 p.m. on 9 October with the intention of going home. He had not mentioned getting any threats. His newspaper is a regional tabloid that often carries stories linked to corruption, organised crime and drug trafficking.Abductions, disappearances and murders of journalists are common in this part of Mexico.  Mauricio Estrada Zamora of the regional daily La Opinión de Apatzingán has been missing since 12 February. Gerardo Israel García Pimentel of the daily La Opinión de Michoacán was gunned down on 8 December 2007 in Uruapan.José Antonio García Apac, the editor of the weekly Ecos de la Cuenca, was last seen on 20 November 2006 near Tepalcatepec, as he was about to set off for his home in Morelia, the capital of Michoacán. The police investigation into his disappearance drew a blank. Freelance photographer Jaime Arturo Olvera Bravo, a former employee of La Voz de Michoacán, was killed on 9 March 2006 in La Piedad. April 28, 2021 Find out more Reports Newscenter_img Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Receive email alerts NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Follow the news on Mexico News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies May 13, 2021 Find out more News October 11, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Michoacán newspaper editor kidnapped and killedlast_img read more

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