Category: apnmcygm

Press release: Boris Johnson teams up with former England cricketer Kevin Pietersen to tackle illegal wildlife trade

first_img Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook October’s conference will focus on tackling the illegal wildlife trade as a serious organised crime, building coalitions and closing illegal wildlife markets.Further information For journalists The illegal wildlife trade is a vile and loathsome crime with organised gangs and criminal scum at the very heart of it. Not only is it wiping out wildlife populations, it is also robbing communities of sustainable incomes and damaging economies across Africa and Asia, all for the senseless demand in live animals and wildlife products for trinkets and quack medicines. Border Force is doing incredible work stopping these items from ending up on the black market here in the UK but more can and must be done on a global scale if we are going to stamp this crime out for good. That’s why we are bringing world leaders together for an international conference this autumn, to find a way to save our charismatic megafauna and endangered species before it is too late. I applaud the work that Kevin and other wildlife campaigners are doing to raise awareness of the plight of endangered rhinos across Africa and Asia. Former England cricketer Kevin Pietersen said: Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and former England cricketer and wildlife campaigner Kevin Pietersen have today (Friday 4 May) teamed up for a visit to see the important role Border Force plays in fighting the illegal wildlife trade at Heathrow Airport.After receiving a briefing from illegal wildlife trade experts in the Border Force team, Mr Johnson and Mr Pietersen were shown confiscated items which people have tried to smuggle through customs and are now housed in Heathrow Airport’s ‘dead shed’.Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: Follow the Foreign Secretary on Twitter @BorisJohnson and Facebook Stopping the illegal wildlife trade is the only way we will save those endangered species which are on the brink of extinction. In South Africa close to three rhinos are illegally killed every single day. It’s shameful that the world is just sitting back and watching as whole species are being wiped out. I support the vital work going on by governments around the world to tackle this issue head on but we need action now to halt the demand for the illegal wildlife trade before we see species wiped out for good. Media enquiries Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn Email [email protected]last_img read more

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Park Cakes reveals loss despite record sales

first_imgPark Cakes has suffered a pre-tax loss of £3.6m, despite hitting a record turnover of £121.2m, as revealed in its latest financial results.The bakery manufacturing firm, which produces cakes for the retail sector, has filed its directors’ report and financial statements with Companies House for the 53-week period to 31 March 2012.It revealed an operating loss of £700,000, in comparison to 2011 in which Park Cakes reported a profit of £1.2m. This included exceptional costs of £500,000 and an amortisation credit of £1.7m on negative goodwill.The directors’ report said: “The UK cake market grew by 3% last year. Company turnover outperformed the market growing to another record high of £121.2m, up 11% versus the previous year. This was again driven by all year round increases in core categories, particularly in hot eating desserts.”The company attributed its significant sales growth to new product development, meeting customers’ target margins and reacting quickly to additional demand created by successful promotional activity.Looking at the trading environment, Park Cakes’ directors said the strength of its supermarket and food retailer customers, combined with competitive pressure in the industry, represent continuing risks which could result in lost sales to key competitors.It added that sales with supermarkets and consumer demand are inherently uncertain and a fall in demand may result in the company requiring additional funding.last_img read more

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In the mind’s ear

first_img A mobile comes home Museum staff work to hang the mobile. Carlos Amorales called the work “an expansion of the building.” Alexander Calder would have admired the new installation that hangs above the Harvard Art Museums’ Calderwood Courtyard. Constructed of 16 chrome-plated steel triangles, 15 painted steel bars, and black climbing rope, “Triangle Constellation” attaches to the steel trusses that support architect Renzo Piano’s glass ceiling. The piece evokes the work of Calder (1898–1976), the renowned American sculptor considered by many the father of the mobile.It’s no surprise. Carlos Amorales, the Mexican artist who created the Harvard sculpture on a commission, was part of a residency at Calder’s country house and studio in Saché, France, three years ago. There in the French countryside, he immersed himself in Calder’s world and work, particularly the organic-seeming structure of the mobiles. “They have these branch-like ways of coming together,” Amorales said recently, speaking by phone from his studio in Mexico City. “By looking at his work I got this image: I wanted to make a mobile with symbols.”That image became Amorales’ 2012 piece “We’ll See How All Reverberates,” which was displayed at the Guggenheim Museum in New York and is the predecessor to the Harvard work. In the earlier installation, Amorales opted for 35 copper symbols instead of steel triangles to create his “public instrument,” one that anyone could play with the piece’s accompanying mallets — no specific musical training or lengthy lessons required. Harvard Art Museums’ Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography Deborah Martin Kao (from left), Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Mary Schneider Enriquez, and artist Carlos Amorales watch the action. A new piece by Mexican artist Carlos Amorales is installed from the courtyard ceiling of the Harvard Art Museums. The installation is a large mobile made up of 16 large steel triangles. Jeff Cook is pictured during the installation. Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographercenter_img Museum guests observe the installation, which celebrates Piano’s architecture while encouraging visitors to “see the space differently,” said Mary Schneider Enriquez, the Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Collections Specialist Sean Lunsford lends a hand during the installation. According to Amorales, the Harvard piece is more “about the idea of sound than how it sounds.” The same goes at the Harvard Art Museums. On special occasions, visitors will have the chance to treat Amorales’ piece as a giant instrument, swinging one of two long steel “strikers” to gently play the lowest hanging triangle, which is the size of a standard orchestral triangle. The triangles get bigger the higher up they hang. The largest measures almost 6 feet on each side.But those musical interludes will be fleeting. According to Amorales, the Harvard piece is more “about the idea of sound than how it sounds.”In planning the piece, Amorales and Harvard curators discussed its size and scope. It had to be big enough to animate the vast space, it had to complement Piano’s bold plan — which unites the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler museums under one roof — and it had to be transparent. (A key feature of Piano’s design is the open sightlines that allow visitors to easily peer into different collections from the museum’s central circulation corridor.)Amorales called the work “an expansion of the building. You see how a triangle expands, how it becomes larger and larger. And then, how conceptually, you can see [through the triangles], but also through the windows, through the collections. It’s like a center.”The sculpture also highlights curators’ ambition for public spaces in the newly reopened museums. Placing even more art in the courtyard fit “the opportunity to bring art out of a traditional gallery space and have it make a statement, so that visitors could then think of art in different ways,” said Mary Schneider Enriquez, the Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, who helped select Amorales for the commission.His work, she said, also celebrates Piano’s architecture while encouraging visitors to “see the space differently.”“We are up and alive,” added Enriquez, “but we are still actively moving forward and doing new things, and so this [work] puts a kind of frame around who we are as we grow.”last_img read more

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Mark Claster Mamolen Dissertation Workshop on Afro-Latin American Studies announces Class of 2017

first_imgThe Afro-Latin American Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research (ALARI), has selected the 2017 Class for the Mark Claster Mamolen Dissertation Workshop on Afro-Latin American Studies.The 14 members of the second edition of the Mark Claster Mamolen Dissertation Workshop were selected from a pool of forty-two applicants from universities and research institutions in Germany, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and United States. Their work on a variety of topics and time periods reflects the richness of Afro-Latin American Studies, with contributions from the fields of Anthropology, History, Literature, Legal Studies, and Ethnic Studies.Find the complete list of the 2017 class of the Mark Claster Mamolen Dissertation Workshop here.For further inquiries, please write to: [email protected]last_img read more

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Summer skeeters

first_imgBy Elmer GrayUniversity of GeorgiaWith summer just around the corner, nuisance populations of Asiantiger mosquitoes are soon to follow. One of Georgia’s most commonmosquito pests, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedesalbopictus), thrives as temperatures rise.Asian tiger mosquitoes were introduced into this country inHouston, Tex., in the mid-1980s. Since then, they’ve spreadthrough much of the eastern United States. They’re not thought tobe major disease carriers yet in this country. But they areaggressive daytime biters, so considerable efforts are spenttrying to reduce their larval habitats.These mosquitoes are black and white, with a characteristicmedian, white stripe on the thorax, lateral stripes on theabdomen and striped legs. These markings and their aggressivedaytime biting make them fairly easy to identify.Mosquito havensThey prefer to breed in any kind of container that will holdwater. The container breeding and daytime activities make themhard to control through conventional practices such aslarge-scale treating with larvicides and adulticides.The best way to prevent nuisance populations is simply toeliminate all forms of standing water around our homes andneighborhoods. Target buckets, pet dishes, tarps, toys, usedtires and any debris that will hold water.And don’t just check once. Getting rid of standing water aroundour homes and neighborhoods should be a way of life, not aone-time or even a once-a-month routine.Asian tiger mosquitoes aren’t strong fliers. They often don’tmove more than 100 yards from where they hatch. So, if you have alot of them around your home, you won’t have to look far to findtheir larval habitat.Swarms of skeetersThat is far different from what many Georgia residents face inthe lower portion of the state. There, large lowland areasprovide ideal breeding sites for many native mosquito species.South Georgians don’t want to think of Asian tiger mosquitoes.They’ve been dealing with heavy populations of other mosquitoesfor more than two months as a result of the heavy rains in earlyspring and wet conditions stretching back to last year’shurricane season.Native flood-water mosquitoes have been particularly troublesomewhere most low-lying areas have been inundated with water forlong periods over the past eight months.Fortunately, no significant mosquito-borne disease outbreaks havebeen reported, although two cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitishave been reported this spring.DiseasesThese have involved a horse from Bacon County and a flock ofquail in Lanier County. Both are indicators that there is viralactivity in the local mosquito populations. People who live inthese areas should be particularly cautious.On the West Nile virus front, news has been quiet so far thisseason. As of May 16, no WNV-positive birds, horses, mosquitoesor humans have been reported this year.That’s not completely unexpected, since the peak period for WNVin Georgia continues to be August and September. The peak periodcoincides with hurricane season, and last year’s active seasonmay have suppressed West Nile activity.In Georgia, the primary carrier of West Nile virus is theSouthern house mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus). Thismosquito breeds regularly in storm drains and sewer systems,which are flushed of stagnant water by periods of heavy rain.In 2004, Georgia had 22 verified cases in humans, with one death.Three horses and 105 birds tested positive for the virus.Nationwide, 2470 human cases and 88 deaths were reported in 41states.(Elmer Gray is an Extension Service entomologist for theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

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Tech Time: 4 ways technology has changed financial services

first_imgThe emergence of new technologies has had a dramatic impact on the way Americans do business. For many industries, technological advances have transformed enterprise operation and structure. The financial services industry has been revolutionized by the digital age. New technologies and the shift toward the cloud have made some aspects of business operations easier and has facilitated operating on a scale that is otherwise unattainable. However, this shift does come with its own set of challenges. Here are four ways technology has shaped the financial services sector.1. Data Is Virtual, Not Physical. Years ago, credit unions and banks were focused on securing physical data—guarding servers and tangible files filled with personal and sensitive information. This emphasis has shifted as data is largely virtual. Of course, branch security remains a priority, but financial institutions must also fend off large-scale attacks, as the costs of a cyberattack are potentially devastating.Automation has changed almost every aspect of financial services. Credit unions and banks have computerized tellers, digital records, and electronic payments, and all of this data can be sent across the world with the click of a button. The plethora of personal information collected in the course of business is sensitive, identifiable, and vulnerable. When a financial enterprise is hacked, a lot more than money is at stake. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Instant issuance: SFP or SaaS?

first_imgInstant issuance has become a valuable service offering for credit unions as they respond to on-demand member expectations, expedite cards into members’ hands, and capture greater interchange revenue potential.For credit unions exploring instant issuance, the big question is whether to adopt a Software for Purchase (SFP) or Software as a Service (SaaS) model, says Rob Dixon, [email protected] product manager for CPI Card Group.He breaks down key considerations credit unions face when evaluating these two options.CUNA News: What do credit unions need to consider when evaluating an instant issuance solution?Dixon: To begin, establishing responsibilities around cryptographic keys is crucial. Financial institutions receive encrypted keys from their processor for bank identification numbers (BINs), which are used as each card is printed to calculate payment card values. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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New brand of tourism identity of Zadar County presented

first_imgToday, in the Rector’s Palace in Zadar, the Zadar County Tourist Board presented the new brand-identity of Zadar County tourism. Strategy  branding of the tourist destination of Zadar County, which was launched by the Zadar County Tourist Board in 2017, the aim was to determine the market or target audience and create a strong and credible brand agreed and harmonized among residents, tourism industry and the system of tourist boards and local self-government. The Strategy also wanted to define the recognizability of the brand that will distinguish Zadar County from the mass of the same or similar destinations, which will create loyalty of guests, connect with visitors creating an experience, a brand that will be remembered and returned, say the Zadar County Tourist Board.Mihaela Kadija, director of the Zadar County Tourist Board, pointed out that the solution was reached through a long process of surveys, interviews and talks, as well as workshops and excellent cooperation with representatives of tourist boards and the tourism industry, opinion leaders and other key subjects of the county. She pointed out the adaptability of the solution that can be applied to many tourist products of Zadar County, and certainly our local tourist boards will be able to apply it perfectly for their needs. “The product is a modern and attractive material that puts us alongside big destinations and rises above the competition. “ Kadija pointed out.In the next marketing period, TZŽ expects cooperation and application throughout the tourism sector, whose representatives at the Panel “Connection / interdependence of the real and public sector in destination branding” confirmed this as a guarantee of brand success. “Together, we need to impose ourselves as a destination as a tourist destination that offers numerous activities, and work seriously on the availability of information about this, the existing offer. “Kadija concluded.HD Consulting is responsible for the development of the Strategy, while the BBDO agency developed the visual and verbal standards of communication and was in charge of photo and video production.last_img read more

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No ‘ogoh-ogoh’ parades, large crowds during Nyepi this year

first_imgThe isolation during Nyepi in a way resembles social distancing, unlike the rituals prior to and following Nyepi, which usually involve large crowds.Amid growing concerns over the COVID-19 outbreak, Bali Governor Wayan Koster has banned all ogoh-ogoh (menacing-looking giant effigies) parades across the province, not even a short march around small neighborhoods, during this year’s ngerupuk ritual on the eve of Nyepi, is allowed.“No ogoh-ogoh parade in any form [is allowed],” Koster said last week while announcing his policy.Ngerupuk is the island’s biggest street parade, in which the local youths compete with each other to create the most magnificent ogoh-ogoh. The COVID-19 outbreak in Indonesia has undeniably impacted how religious communities observe their traditions.On Wednesday, Balinese Hindus will observe Nyepi (Day of Silence), which marks the Balinese New Year and is reserved for self-reflection.In Bali, Nyepi is synonymous with deserted beaches, empty streets and lights switched off at night. Nyepi is the only day of the year when Bali’s airport and seaports close. Everyone, regardless of their religion, must remain in their house or hotel during Nyepi.  Editor’s note: This article has been updated with information about religious observations in Bali during the COVID-19 pandemic.Topics :center_img Ogoh-ogoh were first introduced in the 1980s and have since become a permanent fixture at Nyepi spectacles across Bali, the only Hindu-majority province in Indonesia which relies much on tourism.“Actually, the ogoh-ogoh parade is not part of the original Nyepi rituals. So, we are not obliged to hold the parade,” the head of the Indonesian Hindu Religious Council’s (PHDI) Bali chapter, I Gusti Ngurah Sudiana, said, urging all Balinese Hindu communities to obey the call.The PHDI, Bali Customary Village Council, and Bali governor also urged Balinese Hindus to host the melasti — a procession that features pilgrimages to the sea to purify temples — and tawur agung rituals with a smaller number of participants.“Because the virus is highly contagious, we urge people to adjust the rituals to make our island safer for all of us,” Sudiana said.Bali, a province with more than 4 million people, has six confirmed COVID-19 cases with two fatal cases as of Monday, all of which authorities said originated outside the island. The province has yet to confirm any local transmission.One day after Nyepi, Balinese Hindus perform the ngembak geni ritual, in which they travel to their hometowns or visit relatives to exchange forgiveness.But on Monday, less than three days before the ngembak geni ritual, Koster issued another notice advising people to stay at home on Thursday.Yet there have been reports of people defying authorities.Young people carried ogoh-ogoh in processions through the streets of Denpasar on Tuesday.”The Satpol PP [Public Order Agency], backed by the pecalang [Balinese traditional guard] immediately dispersed the groups,” Denpasar city spokesperson Dewa Gede Rai said.Another large crowd reportedly headed to a beach in Gianyar for the Hindu melasti ceremony a few days before Nyepi.In Jakarta, the country’s epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, Nyepi’s series of ceremonies were held with similar adjustments to the number of participants.Less than 30 Hindus — all wearing masks — gathered at Aditya Jaya Hindu temple in Rawamangun, East Jakarta on Tuesday to observe the tawur agung ceremony, held a day before Nyepi.Jakarta’s Nyepi organizing committee chairman Ida Bagus Nyoman Banjar said smaller celebrations did not reduce the meaning of Nyepi.“We will follow the government’s call to limit congregational [rituals] and keep a distance. But the meaning of the rituals is not diminished at all,” he said after the event on Tuesday.The committee has also canceled the ogoh-ogoh parade to prevent large crowds.“We already have the ogoh-ogoh here, but we will keep them for next year’s event,” said Banjar, who is also a doctor.As a doctor, Banjar said he understood well the importance of following the government’s call to maintain social distance.“Social distancing is our collective effort to fight COVID-19,” he added.Jakarta’s Hindu community performed a melasti purification ritual in Segara Cilincing Hindu Temple in North Jakarta on Sunday. It was also attended by less than 30 participants.I Gede Ngurah Utama, a Hindu who lives in Cempaka Putih, Central Jakarta, said that Tuesday was the first time he went to the temple after the PHDI had urged Hindus to pray at home, in line with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s instruction to self-isolate.”It was quite empty. Usually more people come,” he said.Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan, after a meeting with religious leaders in the capital, announced on Thursday that the city would limit Nyepi ceremonies and other religious practices for the next two weeks.“During Nyepi, Hindus are required to stay at home and reflect on themselves and this is in accordance with the social distancing measure called for by the government,” said I Nengah Dharma of the PHDI’s Jakarta chapter.The policy has been put in place to stem the transmission of the coronavirus disease, as Jakarta continues to see a rising number of confirmed COVID-19 cases, which stood at 377 as of Tuesday. Jakarta also recorded 32 deaths.Several other regions also canceled ogoh-ogoh processions and limited rituals ahead of Nyepi, including Yogyakarta and East Java’s Surabaya.Many Catholic, Christian and Muslim communities have also adjusted their religious traditions to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.last_img read more

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$1K IMCA Modified feature at Thunderbird complements salute to veterans, fireworks

first_imgQuestions about the Saturday race program at Thunderbird, sponsored by Allstar Performance, can be directed to 231 766-3300. More information is also available on Facebook. Pit gates open at 3 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 4:30 p.m. with hot laps at 5 p.m. and racing at 6:30 p.m.  There is no entry fee for the July 11 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier at Muskegon and IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Dirt Works Eastern Region, KMJ Perfor­mance State and track points will be awarded.  MUSKEGON, Mich. – A $1,000 to win IMCA Modified feature event complements the Saturday salute to veterans and lots of fireworks at Thunderbird Raceway.  Pit passes are $30. Spectator admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors 60 years and over and $5 for kids ages 6-11. Veterans with ID and youngsters five and under are free. last_img read more

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