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HILT Spark Grant Fall 2014 awards announced

first_imgHILT awarded six Spark Grants of $5-$15K to projects intended to “spark” promising teaching and learning projects this year:A crash course in Harvard College undergraduates. Michael Zachau Walker and Sophia Watkins (College) will design a workshop equipping teaching fellows with increased understanding of teaching Harvard undergraduates in order to foster meaningful and productive relationships.Evaluating the impact of multimedia enhancements of case materials. Maria Flanagan, Carolyn Wood, Dan Levy, Christopher Robichaud, Mae Klinger and Laura Winig (HKS) will conduct a comparison study to identify the impact of multimedia enhancements of case materials on student preparation and engagement.An introduction to numerical computing for undergraduates. Adam Cohen and Christopher Stubbs (FAS) will develop a two-week module on basic computational methods in MATLAB, lowering the barrier to use for students in courses from biology to economics.New models for evaluating learning outcomes in digital humanities teaching. Jeffrey Schnapp, Jessica Yurkofsky, and Kyle Parry (FAS-metaLAB) will host a workshop around opportunities and challenges in digital humanities teaching, applying lessons learned to the assessment of metaLAB platforms.Online resource for speaking and communication. Sarah Jessop and Marlon Kuzmick (FAS-Bok Center) will film a series of interviews (inspired by “Harvard Writes”) to convene a campus-wide conversation on the role of spoken communication in teaching, scholarship, and collaboration.A tool to facilitate peer review and assessment. Dan Coffey and David J. Malan (SEAS) will provide a low-cost tool that automatically captures video of instructors, facilitating more robust peer review and frequent opportunity for pedagogical assessment.last_img read more

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Ryan to step down as Ed School dean

first_imgAfter leading the Graduate School of Education for four years, Dean James E. Ryan has announced that he will leave Harvard at the end of this academic year to become the University of Virginia’s next president, beginning Oct. 1, 2018.Ryan, who is also the Charles William Eliot Professor of Education, is a top scholar on law and education, an authority on school desegregation and school choice, and a forceful advocate for expanding educational opportunities to close the student achievement gap.Under Ryan’s leadership, the School of Education has strengthened its standing at the top of its field in numerous ways. He helped guide efforts to expand professional development and teacher-training courses, both online and on campus, and oversaw the launch of innovative programs on teaching and learning. He also led the School’s record fund-raising efforts.“While I am excited and honored by the chance to serve my alma mater and a university at which I taught for fifteen years, it will be difficult to leave HGSE,” said Ryan in a letter to the Ed School community, announcing his departure. “I was an outsider to this institution when I arrived in 2013, but you quickly made me feel welcome. In a short period of time, I came not only to deeply admire this community, but to love it. The sense of mission, the dedication and talent, and the care and compassion that abound on Appian Way make this a remarkable community, and it has been one of the great privileges of my professional life to be a part of it.”“An outstanding academic leader, teacher, and scholar with a commitment to improving and expanding education for all, Jim Ryan worked with colleagues to bring a transformational vision to the Harvard Graduate School of Education,” said Harvard President Drew Faust. “Harvard will miss his thoughtful and compassionate leadership, and I will miss Jim’s voice, wisdom, and humor as a member of the Council of Deans and a leader here on campus. I congratulate the University of Virginia’s Board of Visitors and the entire UVA community on the selection of their next president.”Faust said she will launch a search for Ryan’s successor shortly and will welcome advice on the selection from across the Ed School community.Ryan grew up in a blue-collar New Jersey suburb, attending Yale University and the University of Virginia School of Law. His early years fueled a passion that he said “stems from personal experience” on the importance of fair and effective education. He is a longtime champion of greater diversity, equity, and inclusion in education, and has written extensively on those principles while promoting programs embracing them.With colleagues, he began an ongoing community-wide conversation on fulfilling the promise of diversity to help prepare students to work in diverse environments, and launched Reimagining Diverse and Equitable Schools (RIDES), a project to boost the number of diverse K–12 schools and to share best practices to help them tap into their diversity to thrive.In 2016, Ryan became a YouTube star of sorts after he gave a Commencement speech on what he deemed the five essential questions to ask in life. The strong ripple effects of that address encouraged him to write a book, “Wait, What?,” that became a best-seller.Ryan led the Ed School through a period of sustained growth and expansion with the same energy and discipline that helped him run three Boston Marathons. To further a School goal of preparing leaders to remake education, he worked with faculty colleagues to unveil the Harvard Teacher Fellows Program to train College seniors interested in teaching careers. He worked in the same collaborative spirit to establish the Teaching and Learning Lab, which supports new approaches to those areas on campus, and oversaw the genesis of two online programs, the Certificate of Advanced Education Leadership and an upcoming online certificate program in partnership with Harvard Business School. He also shepherded the addition of a fifth floor to the School’s Longfellow Hall.To help disseminate the knowledge produced by researchers, Ryan moved to relaunch Usable Knowledge, which translates education research into stories and strategies for educators, parents, and the public. Hoping to attract entrepreneurs to help foster innovation education, he oversaw the launch of Scaling for Impact, a project to bring creative ideas to scale.Under his leadership, the School raised $278 million as of September, surpassing its campaign goal of $250 million more than a year ahead of schedule. The support includes $35.5 million from the Saul Zaentz Charitable Foundation, the largest gift in the School’s history, which funded a major early childhood initiative. During Ryan’s tenure, revenue from the School’s popular professional development programs more than doubled.Ryan also increased the size of the faculty. He hired 17 new faculty members and added 12 to the senior ranks. He established the Global Visiting Fellows program, which brings in international scholars, as well as the Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship for Faculty Development to prepare recent doctoral graduates from diverse backgrounds to succeed and thrive in careers as faculty members in education.Before coming to Harvard, Ryan was a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he taught constitutional law, law and education, and land-use law courses, and where he was a founding director of the public service program. In addition to co-authoring a textbook on “Educational Policy and the Law,” he wrote, “Five Miles Away, A World Apart,” in which he explored school segregation and inequality by comparing two schools, one mostly white and middle class and another mostly black and poor, around Richmond, Va.In an interview with the Gazette in 2013 as he was taking the reins of the Ed School, Ryan spoke thoughtfully about the roots of his interest in education.“I grew up in a blue-collar suburb in northern New Jersey, and neither of my parents went to college,” he said. “I attended the public schools in my hometown and was lucky enough to go to a great university. That experience literally changed my life and got me thinking as early as college about how lucky I was that the system worked for me, and wondering why it has failed so many others. And that really was the impetus for the questions I’ve been asking on almost all my scholarly work since. I’ve been trying to figure out, basically, how law and policy might expand educational opportunities and also strengthen supports outside of school, so that more students have an honest chance to fulfill their potential.”last_img read more

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Belles Against Violence Office promotes safe environment at College

first_imgOne in four female college students experience sexual assault on a college campus. This statistic is what has inspired some members of the Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) to take action against sexual assault, dating abuse and stalking.The group strives to create a culture of acceptance by showing the impact an active bystander can have on a situation, sophomore Courtney Driscoll, Student Advisory Committee member and Green Dot Committee co-chair, said. “BAVO is the voice that stands for students who are maybe unable to speak, and it creates a safer space for students to feel more welcome and included,” Driscoll said. “It cultivates a culture just free of violence, which is really important — especially being an all-women’s campus.”BAVO is constantly evolving it’s resources and programs so that it can continue to reach out to the diverse needs of the ever-growing campus, BAVO director Connie Adams said in an email. At its core, Adams said, BAVO’s mission is about constant support.“Last year, the BAVO Student Advisory Committee began to focus on reinforcing that we are also Belles for … things like healing, support, strength, courage,” Adams said. “Unfortunately, power-based personal violence (PBPV) impacts individuals regardless of their identities, but we know some individuals/groups are at a higher risk or have unique challenges. We are having conversations about additional barriers to reporting for individuals who are of color or are a part of the LGBTQIA community.”This year BAVO is hosting new events to help spread awareness to the Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and Holy Cross communities in an engaging way, senior Abbie Spica said, one specific event being an information session on the importance of Title IX. Title IX is a federal law that prohibits gender-based discrimination in any federally-funded education program or activity.“[The] Title IX event is open to all ND, HC and SMC students,” she said. “It’s important for all to attend. This is the first time we are going to be talking about Title IX beyond the scope of sexual assault. This year we are also working on some new collaborations with Feminists United and [the] Student Diversity Board, to name a few.”BAVO not only has a large impact on campus communities, but also on the world at large, Spica said.“It’s our responsibility to make sure we are taking care of our human community, and if we can do it on this campus in a fun and engaging way to raise awareness, then that’s a good way for us to accomplish our ultimate goal of ending violence,” Spica said.Adams also believes that in order to end to violence, there needs to be a change in the mentality of society. “What we need is a culture change,” she said. “A culture where we aren’t afraid to talk about these issues, where we commit to demonstrate how violence is not one of our community values, where we recognize that we do play a role, even if we choose to do nothing. There is no such thing as neutrality. Either we act, or we don’t. If we don’t take collective and individual responsibility for our community, who will?” The desire to stand up for others in order to end violence is what has led many students, like Driscoll, to joining BAVO and getting involved with the various programs it promotes. Driscoll said this club was the best way for her to stand up for what she believes in.“I always knew that I wanted to stand up for things and be a leader, and I knew that I could do it through this,” she said. “I saw a chance to be a voice for people who were maybe too timid or afraid. I knew I had a voice, and that I needed to use my voice to help other people and my campus. I think the more people that get involved with BAVO will find that it draws you in and makes you want to be a voice, too.”Tags: BAVO, Belles Against Violence Office, sexual assault awareness, Title IXlast_img read more

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Summersville, W.Va.

first_imgPopulation: 3,572Public lands: Gauley River National Recreation Area, Summersville Lake State Wildlife Area, Cranberry Wildlife Management AreaOutdoor Highlights: Gauley River, Summersville Lakelast_img

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S.C. Historical Society sets dinner

first_imgS.C. Historical Society sets dinner February 1, 2006 Regular News S.C. Historical Society sets dinner The Florida Supreme Court Historical Society will hold its annual dinner on Thursday, February 16, at the University Center Club in Tallahassee. Chief Justice Barbara Pariente will deliver the keynote address.Special guest for the occasion will be longtime Florida Congressman Paul Rogers from West Palm Beach, who spent 24 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he was instrumental in the passage of major legislation in the fields of health care and the environment. The society will honor Rogers not only for his accomplishments while serving in Congress, but also during his career as a practicing attorney and his steadfast advocacy of a balance of power among the three branches of government. Rogers now practices law in the Washington office of Hogan & Hartson.In addition to society members, the dinner will be attended by the justices of the Florida Supreme Court and members of the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar. Special invitations are also being extended to members of the Bar’s Health Law and Environmental and Land Use Law sections in view of Rep. Rogers’ work over the years on health care and environmental issues.The 7 p.m. dinner and preceding 6 p.m. reception will take place in the University Center Club ballroom on the Florida State University campus.For more information or reservations, contact Park Trammell, FSCHS, P.O. Box 11344, Tallahassee 32302-3344, phone (850) 222-3703, or e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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2Q data: CU shares up 7.3%, membership near 105M

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Federally insured credit unions saw share growth of 7.3 percent, year over year, during the second quarter as membership grew to nearly 105 million, according to call report data released Tuesday by NCUA.NCUA’s 2Q data showed credit union membership growth of 3.8 percent versus a year ago; and loan growth of 10.5 percent, year over year. Credit union membership reached 104.9 million.NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger said the data shows how credit unions are continuing to outshine their competition and build strong ties with their communities.“The second-quarter data indicates credit unions continue to deliver exceptional value and service to their members,” said Berger. “American consumers are seeing the difference between credit unions and their competitors, and the choice is clear. Excellent member service and first-rate products and services continue to set credit unions apart and draw new members to the industry.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Industry win: ADA lawsuit dismissed against CU

first_imgIn a victory for credit unions facing litigation over unclear website requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a federal district court in Virginia Friday found that the plaintiff to such a lawsuit did not have standing to sue the credit union because he was not eligible for membership and would not likely use the credit union’s services.In addition, the court indicated that a website is not a place of public accommodation, thus certain ADA protections were not triggered. In this case, NAFCU filed an amicus brief supporting the credit union.“NAFCU is thrilled that the court agreed that there was no reason to sue our member here,” said NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger. “We will continue to stand with our members in this fight.”Credit unions, banks and other entities have faced a rash of lawsuits in the past year related to website accessibility. NAFCU and its members strongly support the protections of the ADA and efforts to ensure individuals with disabilities are not discriminated against and have equal access to financial services. However, this is best achieved through clear guidance and standards for website compliance, not through meritless and costly lawsuits. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Long Island Press Wins 16 New York Press Association Awards

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Morey Publishing‘s Long Island Press brought home 16 awards at the New York Press Association (NYPA)’s 2014 Better Newspaper Contest held at the Gideon Putnam Resort in Saratoga Springs March 27 and 28.The annual awards competition, spring convention and trade show recognizes journalistic excellence across newspapers and media outlets throughout New York State. It has been held each year since 1930. The Press has swept NYPA twice in the past four years, dominating its 2010 and 2012 contests, earning top prizes in nearly every category and bringing home the competition’s highest honor, the prestigious Stuart C. Dorman Award for editorial excellence. It ranked Second Overall in last year’s contest.The 2014 contest included 3,081 entries submitted by 177 newspapers vying for accolades across 64 categories, including editorial, design, photography and advertising, in addition to Newspaper of the Year, the Dorman award, John J. Evans Award for advertising excellence and Sharon R. Fulmer Award for Community Leadership. Entries were judged by members of the Iowa Press Association.Despite publishing only three print issues last year, the Press came in Third Overall for Single-Flag Newspapers, earning top honors across more than a dozen categories. These included: coverage of the arts, local government, in-depth reporting, news, feature story, news or feature series, sports feature, best front page, home page, user experience, use of social media, online advertising/marketing campaign, special sections/niche publications, special section – advertising and advertising campaign.Press Senior Editor Spencer Rumsey, Staff Writer Jaime Franchi and Editor in Chief Christopher Twarowski brought home First Place in the Coverage of the Arts category for a multi-story entry that included: Rumsey’s colorful portraits of local arts institutions and exhibits—“Rhythm & Roots: Nassau’s African American Museum Brings History to Life,” “‘Women Of The World’ Unite To Capture ‘Feminine Mystique’ In Varying Shades Of Color And Form” and “Flower Power Blooms At Nassau Museum’s ‘Garden Party’ Show;” Franchi’s vibrant and informative “Standardized: New Documentary Takes Testing Battle To Big Screen,” chronicling the anti-Common Core movement’s transition to cinema as a medium of revolt against the controversial education reform; and she and Twarowski’s kaleidoscopic “LI’s Guitar God Joe Satriani Talks Strange Beautiful Music,” a personal, revealing glimpse inside the local six-string extraterrestrial’s artistry and life. “There’s some great variety here,” gushed judges, “but whether they’re about a musician, a gallery showing or a documentary, the stories have a lot in common—clever language (‘unrivaled fretboard wizardry’), colorful descriptions and imagery, great quotes. “I particularly enjoyed the scene painted at the beginning of ‘Standardized,’” one continued, “and that story’s description at the end of bright green shoelaces changing hands and BATs [Badass Teachers Association] taking off into the night. These entries have clever ledes, interesting photos and a good mixture of information and fun.”Twarowski and Multimedia Reporter Rashed Mian took First Place honors in the Best News or Feature Series category for their four-part investigative probe into the ongoing plight of Ronald Bower, a Queens father of two who spent more than 23 years in prison for heinous sex crimes an ever-growing number of law enforcement officials believe he did not commit.The series—“Ronald Bower Granted Parole After 23 Years; ‘Highly Unlikely’ Committed Sex Crimes, Says AG’s Office,” “Schellhammer Abruptly Out As Attorney General’s Conviction Review Bureau Chief,” “Exclusive: Ronald Bower, Released On Parole After 23 Years, Maintains His Innocence” and “Exclusive: Our Long Ride Home With Ronald Bower, A Convicted Sex Offender Who Many Believe Is Innocent”—also included a nearly eight-minute video titled “Ronald Bower Reunites With Family After 23 Years In Prison,” documenting Bower’s release from Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate Dannemora, just south of the Canadian border. “Amazingly in-depth investigative work into a fascinating case—I cannot imagine the time you put into these pieces,” remarked judges. “I congratulate the reporters for the trust you built and the way the story was told from the family’s point of view. Congratulations on your work. I have been judging state newspaper contests for two decades and this is right up there among the best entries I have seen.”The collection of articles also earned Second Place in the In-Depth Reporting category. Press Managing Editor Timothy Bolger clinched Third Place honors in the In-Depth Reporting category for his scathing, no-holds-barred investigative analysis of Long Island’s ongoing heroin epidemic and the failure of local elected officials and municipalities to adequately address it, titled “How Long Island Is Losing Its War On Heroin.” Bolger was part of the Press team that first exposed the insidious drug’s lethal grip on local youth in 2008, in a series titled “Long Highland,” which earned the inaugural presentation of the Sharon R. Fulmer Award for Community Leadership that year for those efforts.“A very long article but easy to read,” commented judges. “I appreciated that the article was not just a collection of facts and figures and quotes from officials but incorporated how individuals are affected by heroin. I also appreciated that the writer tied the end of the article to the beginning by bringing in Mr. Ciappa.”Franchi won Second Place honors in the Sports Feature and Feature Story categories for her intimate portrait of legendary New York Islanders left wing Clark Gillies that highlighted his charitable efforts, and her heartfelt, masterfully crafted narrative about formerly homeless women veterans selflessly working to help other vets returning from war—“Clark Gillies: Power Player For L.I. Children” and “Women Vets Serving The Under-Served,” respectively.“A moving feature that ties a human element into a specific, important issue,” praised judges about the latter, published in the Press’ sister publication Milieu Magazine. “Overall, this is a great example of feature work.”LongIslandPress.com, programmed and designed by Director of New Media Michael Conforti, took home First Place in the Best User Experience category, with judges remarking: “Of all the entries, this one effectively engages viewers providing an enjoyable experience and effortless navigation just as the contest rules state. I like the dropdowns with the photos with one line summary and placement of a few ads which don’t distract from the navigation of the site. Great job and looks easy to keep updated. Length of the homepage is just right, not too short and not extremely long as many of the entries.”LongIslandPress.com also nabbed Second Place for Best Home Page, with judges stating: “The design and typography on this home page are clean and sharp looking… The fact that the drop down menus show photos and story is great. The page is easy to scan for topics of interest.”Bolger, Rumsey, Twarowski and Press Contributor Shelly Feuer Domash earned an Honorable Mention nod in the News Story category for their investigative exclusive “Bigger Mess: Costly New Twist In Ongoing Nassau Police Crime Lab Scandal,” which exposed that despite assurances to the contrary by Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano and then-Nassau District Attorney Kathleen Rice, county taxpayers were secretly being charged more than $2.4 million for unprecedented mismanagement and shameful and/or voluntary negligence at its now-shuttered police crime laboratory. “Out of more than 55 entries, an honorable mention is nothing to scoff at,” wrote judges. “A very solid story bolstered by tons of research on an issue that appeared to have a major impact on taxpayers.”The quartet also earned an Honorable Mention in the Coverage of Local Government category for their collaborative multi-story package that included “Bigger Mess,” Rumsey’s “East Northport Senior Housing Proposal Sparks Heated Debate” and “NIFA OKs Mangano’s 3.4% Nassau Tax Hike,” and Bolger’s comprehensive “Red Light Camera Lobbying for School Bus Stop-Arm Cams.”“This is the kind of in-depth coverage across mediums that we need to see more of,” declared judges. “The coverage was a winner.”The Press staff won Second Place in the Best Use of Social Media category, with judges praising: “This entry does what we all want, engage the community as well as giving comprehensive, in-depth and up-to-date information that affects their lives.”Art Director Jon Sasala and the Morey Publishing design team earned First Place in the Best Advertising Campaign category for their imaginative and visually arresting representation of a local podiatry center. “Great job on this advertising campaign,” commended judges. “The different pictures of feet used in this campaign drew the reader’s eye to the ads, as if the ad jumped off the page. Great job of using a campaign to further bring business to this customer. The ads showed simplicity in advertising, which most often captures the audience’s attention. “Good campaign!” they reiterated.Press staff won First Place in the Special Sections/Niche Publications category for its annual Power List publication highlighting Long Island’s 50 most influential residents. Staffers also took Second Place in the Best Special Section – Advertising category for the annual Bethpage “Best of L.I.” awards competition and publication, with judges declaring the ads “original and eye-catching,” the listings “excellent” and the categories “creative.”LongIslandPress.com’s “Press Patrons Program” earned Second Place honors in the Best Online Advertising / Marketing Campaign category, with judges exclaiming: “Wow! Beautiful landing pages. The links to the landing pages are given prominence on the front page and look very attractive. Not a lot of ‘call to action’ since it isn’t a standard advertising campaign. Cohesive approach to the ‘patrons’ pages.”The Press also won Second Place in the Best Front Page category for the newspaper’s powerful, eye-catching covers. “Great images,” remarked judges. “Clean, crisp appearance. Strong typography and color choices.”#NYPA15 #table2 #saratogabureau #yaddo #skintags #skintagfloaters #vandeusler #goatsandcows #spencerdranktheeggwater #winston #kona #ohio #yakbutter #coffeewithbutter #bulletproof #snowyinspirationalspeeches #bolgerfellasleeponthewindowanditscoldinhereandweneedtorollitup #tears #jaimesacardshark #thatjunkyarddogwantstoeatrashed #onlydrinkketelone #scabby #godblessthebeatles #trinidadscorpion #bonestew #writingthewrongs #donmcleandrankhere #wheresthepillows #afghanifood #epictimes #epochtimes #high5heardcrossthestate #tomothy #heavensgate #taximadness #sethistrippin #tomwaits #t24eva #christmascardfromahookerinminneapolis #alliwantforbreakfastaresomechickenandwafflesathatties #blade #neildiamond #44grand #bolgergotblockedoutofsingingjohnnycash #maine #grumpysmurf #dallasgreen #theswamp #messwiththelongislandpressandillpunchyouinthechest #blackbird #bestteamever #flatscreens #blackvespa #weneedtohelppoorscotty #richhotalingistheshiattlast_img read more

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Meyer continues winning ways at Raceway Park

first_imgBy Bob ConeyJEFFERSON, S.D. (July 17) – Raceway Park hosted a fast and action-packed night of IMCA rac­ing action Sunday, with five divisions of cars taking to the track.In the KISS 107.1 FM IMCA Sport Compact division, Ramsey Meyer continued his dominance at the top of the field, extending his division point lead with his second straight win. Meyer took the lead coming out of the second turn on the fifth lap of the feature and never saw the rear of an­other car again. Luke Jackson took the runner-up spot followed by Don Tank and Tracy Raml.The CarQuest IMCA Hobby Stock feature belonged to Craig Clift from the drop of the green flag.  Clift found a gap in the group of traffic in front of him exiting the second turn on the opening lap and took control before they came back around to complete that opening lap.A late caution flew to bring out a green, white, checkered finish and negate the huge lead Clift had built up to that point. In the final run to the checkered flag, it was Clift followed by Tony Fetter­man, Dave Riley and Matt Baker.Rusty Montagne closed in slightly in one of the track’s closest point chases, taking the MOPAR IMCA Northern SportMod main event.Montagne took the lead with six laps remaining and held off the field through three green, white, checkered finish attempts. His win brought him within seven points of division point leader Karl Brewer, who finished second followed by Darin Roepke and Kirk Beatty.Chris Mills extended his lead atop the Casey’s General Stores IMCA Stock Car division, taking control of the lead with a handful of laps remaining from early pacesetter Mel Elsberry and holding on to the checkers.  Behind Mills and Elsberry, Todd Gereau and Aaron Cain rounded out the top four.The final race of the night was the Total Motors IMCA Modified feature. Dan Loggins jumped out to the early lead and paced the field until colliding with Chris Abelson as Abelson attempted an outside pass out of the fourth turn.Abelson then brought out a caution with a flat tire and did not return from the pit area, while Log­gins restarted at the rear of the field.  This left the lead to Jason Schneiders who held off the field over the final laps to take the feature victory.Behind Schneiders, point leader Ricky Stephan took second followed by Sean Barragan and last week’s winner Jim Cole.last_img read more

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Ankle injury rules Newcastle’s Longstaff out of Liverpool clash

first_imgRelatedPosts Lampard: I still have confidence in Tomori Ighalo: My best moment as ‘Red Devil’ Mane double eases Liverpool to win over 10-man Chelsea Newcastle United midfielder, Sean Longstaff, will miss Saturday’s Premier League clash with leaders Liverpool due to a freak ankle injury in training, manager Steve Bruce said on Friday. Longstaff, who British media reported was a transfer target for Manchester United in the summer, broke into the first team at Newcastle last season and has played all four games of the current campaign. “Unfortunately, Sean Longstaff turned an ankle yesterday in training. He won’t make tomorrow… we won’t know how severe it is until the next couple of days. “It’s one of those freak ones which unfortunately happen. We were disappointed for him that we’ve lost a player to a freak accident. That’s what happens in football unfortunately ,” Bruce  said . Andy Carroll has not played for Newcastle since rejoining them on transfer deadline day due to a niggling ankle injury, although Bruce said the striker was back in training. “I think for everybody to see him joining in with training was good for him, good for the group… we need now positive news from his specialist. “It’s always difficult to put a timescale on someone like Andy. “He’s fit when he’s fit… when you’ve got an ankle like he’s got, it’s always the reaction to the work put in. At the moment it’s all very good,” Bruce added Matt Ritchie is ahead of schedule in his recovery after the winger suffered ankle ligament damage in a League Cup defeat by Leicester City last month. “We weren’t expecting to see him for at least a couple of months… but the way he trained yesterday and the day before. “As long as he doesn’t have a reaction I don’t think he’s very far away… still a couple of week,’’ he saidTags: LiverpoolNewcastle UnitedPremier LeagueSean LongstaffSteve Brucelast_img read more

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