Month: June 2021

Heineken Cup Final – Leinster v Ulster preview

first_imgBest & Co are sure to be targeting this area and will want to apply as much pressure as possible on the Leinster forwards. Starve the Dubliners of decent first-phase possession of the lineout and their back-line will have less time and space with which to weave their magic spells.Mad about Brad: Thorn wants to add another trophy to his impressive collectionBig-game mentalityThis is something Leinster have in spades – that much was clear from their hard-fought victory in Clermont. Take Brad Thorn, for example; he’s a hard-nosed winner who’s lifted numerous honours in both league and union, including a World Cup. Joe Schmidt has allied a dangerous attacking style to a dogged defence and improved scrum, and there’s little doubt they have the most complete game in Europe.A Heineken Cup final is new territory for these Ulster players, but they have risen to the occasion more than once already this season – hammering Leicester at Ravenhill and a knocking Munster out against all the odds in the quarter-final at Thomond Park. This will be another step up again and the Ulster fans will no doubt be adding their voice to proceedings at Twickenham – but will that be enough to inspire their team to victory?VerdictUlster will prove stern opposition, but it’s hard to see past the regal Leinster, so I’m saying Brian O’Driscoll & Co will win by six.LEINSTER v ULSTER, TWICKENHAM, SATURDAY 19 MAY, 5pm, Live on Sky Sports 3 TAGS: LeinsterUlster NOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Fantastic 15: Leinster full-back Rob Kearney is Europe’s most dangerous attacking playerBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorTHE FRENCH and English clubs have fallen by the wayside in this season’s Heineken Cup, so Twickenham will play host to the first all-Irish final on Saturday afternoon. Leinster are bidding for their third title in four years and hope to become the first team since Leicester to win back-to-back Heineken Cup titles, while Ulster are hoping to be crowned European champions for the second time having triumphed back in 1999.Attack v defenceLeinster have one of the most lethal attacking games in world rugby, with all 15 players on the pitch quality passers of the ball and talents who can cut split defences with their footwork and running lines.Rob Kearney is the most dangerous attacking player in Europe right now according to the Amlin Opta Index, which ranks players’ performances throughout the campaign. He’s made 740 metres from 91 carries – and the try he created against Clermont Auvergne in the semi-finals means Ulster will be keeping a close eye on him.Stop sign: Ulster prop John AfoaIn contrast, a solid defence coupled with Ruan Pienaar’s unerring boot have provided the basis for Ulster’s successful run. They have five of the top ranked defensive players in Europe and the return of Chris Henry and John Afoa to the side will only strengthen this area of the game.Afoa has an uncanny ability to shore up Ulster’s defensive line around the contact area, so if opponents cut back inside the prop is often there to grind their run to a halt. Henry may not get as many headlines as his big-hitting team-mate Stephen Ferris, but he is a great tackler who also has a knack of slowing the ball down.It is worth noting here, however, that Leinster are no slouches in defence either; they haven’t conceded a try in their last three Heineken Cup games and are an unbeaten in 14 European matches.In the lineout of fireOne area where Leinster have wobbled this season is in the lineout whereas Ulster have the best lineout stats in Europe, with Johann Muller and Rory Best keeping the side’s set-piece shipshape. LEINSTER: Rob Kearney; Fergus McFadden, Brian O’Driscoll, Gordon D’Arcy, Isa Nacewa; Jonathan Sexton, Eoin Reddan; Cian Healy, Richardt Strauss, Mike Ross, Leo Cullen (capt), Brad Thorn, Kevin McLaughlin, Sean O’Brien, Jamie Heaslip.Replacements: Sean Cronin, Heinke van der Merwe, Nathan White, Devin Toner, Shane Jennings, Isaac Boss, Ian Madigan, David Kearney.ULSTER: Stefan Terblanche; Andrew Trimble, Darren Cave, Paddy Wallace, Craig Gilroy; Paddy Jackson, Ruan Pienaar; Tom Court, Rory Best, John Afoa, Johann Muller (capt), Dan Tuohy, Stephen Ferris, Chris Henry, Pedrie Wannenburg.Replacements: Nigel Brady, Paddy McAllister, Declan Fitzpatrick, Lewis Stevenson, Willie Faloon, Paul Marshall, Ian Humphreys, Adam D’Arcy.last_img read more

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England’s Mat Turner shortlisted for Sevens award

first_imgEngland’s Mat Turner runs through a tackle by Argentina during the Hong Kong Rugby Sevens tournament on March 23, 2012. The tournament will be held from March 23 to 25. AFP PHOTO / Antony DICKSON (Photo credit should read ANTONY DICKSON/AFP/GettyImages) In the draw for the Marriott London Sevens, England will compete in Pool B against the USA, France and Samoa on day one. England have provided two of the previous winners of the IRB award, Simon Amor scooping the prize in 2004 and Ollie Phillips in 2009. Cecil Afrika (South Africa) picked up last season’s honours.Turner said: “It’s a real honour to be nominated and to be held in that regard by your peers. My form’s been good this season but I get put in the position to score the tries and it’s a team effort. I’ve just found myself in the right place at the right time – so I can’t complain about that!” England’s Mathew Turner was today shortlisted as a contender for the IRB International Sevens Player of the Year award.The former Bristol wing faces competition from two New Zealanders – half back Tomasi Cama and wing Frank Halai – for the accolade, which will be presented after the ninth and final leg of this season’s HSBC Sevens World Series at Twickenham next weekend.Turner, 24, has enjoyed a spectacular season playing at centre of half back, scoring eight tries in six games at last weekend’s Glasgow Sevens, where England were beaten 29-14 in the final by New Zealand.One of 12 full-time contracted sevens players on England’s books, he has scored 33 tries this season – only two less than teammate Dan Norton, who leads the series try table going into the Marriott London Sevens. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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French fatigue: Long season blamed for Argentina defeat

first_img France’s lock Pascal Pape (L), prop Vincent Debaty (C) look dejected after losing to ArgentinaIN CASE you missed it what with all the misery surrounding the Home Nations narrow defeats at the weekend, France also suffered at the hands of the southern hemisphere. Their 23-20 loss to Argentina in Cordoba was Les Bleus eighth defeat in 11 matches against the Pumas, writes Gavin Mortimer.France have the chance to level the two-Test series this Saturday when they face Argentina in Tucuman but coach Philippe Saint-Andre was brutally honest in his assessment of the defeat. Asked in an interview with L’Equipe, the French sports daily, if his side had failed to close out the game having led at half-time, Saint-Andre snapped: “The truth is that in the Top 14 final props of both sides [Toulouse and Toulon] were foreign. The fly-halves also. So there you are. End of story.”It’s not the first time Saint-Andre has criticised the number of overseas players in the Top 14 (despite his having been in charge of Toulon for two years) and the detrimental effect it’s having on the national side. But what can be done about it?Unlike the comparatively smooth relationship that now exists between the RFU and the leading English clubs, relations in France are far more fractious with Saint-Andre – like his predecessor Marc Lievremont – bemoaning the lack of time he has with his players. He was at it again in the L’Equipe interview, saying of Argentina: “They have 25 players who have been in a World Cup-type training camp ahead of the Four Nations later this summer, and all paid for by the French clubs! And us [France], we tried to have three and a half days before taking on a side who have had three weeks together.”Saint-Andre has a point. Three of the French XV – Louis Picamoles, Florian Fritz and Yoann Maestri – that started against the Pumas had been playing in the final of the Top 14 seven days earlier before jumping on a plane and arriving exhausted on the other side of the world. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS France’s lock Pascal Pape (R), prop Vincent Debaty (C) and flanker Fulgence Ouedraogo, react after being defeated by Argentina’s Pumas during their rugby union international test match at Mario Kempes stadium in Cordoba, some 700 Km northwest of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on June 16, 2012. Argentina won by 23-20. AFP PHOTO / Juan Mabromata (Photo credit should read JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/GettyImages) Saint-Andre is aware that he’s echoing the complaints made by his predecessors and he’s realistic to acknowledge it’s highly unlikely the FFR [French Federation] and LNR [the Top 14 governing body] will cooperate to make his life easier. Only recently the top clubs mooted the idea of expanding the Top 14 by two clubs, a crazy idea considering the already packed fixture list. Fortunately the proposal didn’t come to pass but Saint-Andre remains pessimistic about the future.One of the most startling statistics to emerge from the recent Top 14 season was that both the semi-finals and the final of the competition failed to produce a single try: imagine, 240 minutes of rugby and no one managed to dot down for a five pointer. The Top 14 final was roundly acknowledged by the neutral to have been one of the most tedious matches in the league’s 120-year history and who can forget the all-French borefest that was this year’s Amlin Cup final between Biarritz and Toulon. Again not a try to be seen. The brutal fact is – and let’s hope the Welsh boys heading to France next season are aware of this – players in France are being worked into the ground. The final of the Top 14 was on June 9 and the 2012-13 season kicks off on August 18. Compare that with the Aviva Premiership, which climaxed on May 26 and reconvenes on September 1. French players are exhausted most of the year round, and Saint-Andre knows it. As he admitted sardonically of the defeat to Argentina: “It wasn’t a match of high quality but the ball was in play for 11 minutes more than the Top 14 final.”French flair isn’t dead but it’s in a deep sleep.last_img read more

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Lions 2013: Lewis Moody gets the lowdown on the second Test

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Click here for your chance to win an off-road driving experience with a Lion! Changing it up: Ben Youngs will take Mike Phillips’s starting berth for the second Test v Australia in MelbourneFIRST BLOOD went to the tourists, but the early glory has been forgotten by Lions fans who are biting their nails in anticipation of the second Test match against Australia. So how are the team feeling? Lewis Moody went to catch up with Ben Youngs, Dan Lydiate and Jon Davies in the team hotel in Melbourne. Check out the video below!last_img

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World Cup 2015: Australia 35-34 Scotland

first_img TAGS: Highlight Scotland went out of the World Cup in the most agonising fashion, as they led 34-32 with 90 seconds to go but a late Bernard Foley penalty sent the Wallabies into the semis Attendance: 77,110So close: Scotland walk off disconsolately in their narrow lossStatsAustralia ran 325 metres to Scotland’s 246Australia beat 17 defenders compared to Scotland’s 10Australia were turned over 17 times, to Scotland’s 9David Denton carried furthest in the game with 58 metres, followed by Kurtley Beale with 54 and Adam Ashley-Cooper with 47Jonny Gray was the top tackler with 18, Blair Cowan was next with 13 and Richie Gray with 10Australia: K Beale, A Ashley-Cooper, T Kuridrani, M Giteau, D Mitchell, B Foley, W Genia; S Sio, S Moore (capt), S Kepu, K Douglas, R Simmons, S Fardy, M Hooper, B McCalman.Onwards: The Wallabies snatched victory from the jaws of defeatScorersTries: Adam Ashley-Cooper, Drew Mitchell (2) Michael Hooper, Tevita KuridraniCons: Bernard Foley (2)Pens: Bernard Foley (2)Replacements: T Polota-Nau, J Slipper, G Holmes, D Mumm, S McMahon, N Phipps, M Toomua, Q CooperScotland: S Hogg, S Maitland, M Bennett, P Horne, T Seymour, F Russell, G Laidlaw (capt); A Dickinson, R Ford, WP Nel, J Gray, R Gray, B Cowan, J Hardie, D Denton.Replacements: F Brown, G Reid, J Welsh, T Swinson, J Strauss, H Pyrgos, R Vernon,  S LamontScorersTries: Pete Horne, Tommy Seymour, Mark Bennett Australia won a breathtaking quarter-final, with a Bernard Foley penalty with seconds left on the clock. The Wallabies had come out of the traps confidently, playing a controlled, expansive game, opening the scoring after nine minutes through Adam Ashley-Cooper, however Scotland came back brilliantly and Pete Horne danced through the gap to reply on 17 minutes. After a fine penalty from Greig Laidlaw put them 13-5 up, Drew Mitchell was the next Wallaby to cross as the ball was worked wide. With a try before the break by Michael Hooper, the Wallabies trailed by a point. After the break Drew Mitchell and Tevita Kuridrani scored, the first when Sean Maitland was in the bin. Tommy Seymour streaked in after an intercept, and again on 73 minutes, when Mark Bennett scored, before the late Foley kick broke Scottish hearts.What’s hotScottish resolveLet’s remember, Scotland didn’t win a game in the Six Nations in a soul-destroying campaign. They were facing The Rugby Championship winners, Australia and were universally written off before the game. After conceding early, they kept chipping away, keeping in touch with the Wallabies through Greig Laidlaw‘s boot, even though they were outscored five tries Scotland’s three. Tommy Seymour‘s try lifted the metaphorical roof at Twickenham and when Mark Bennett picked up the intercept, in the rain, people lost all inhibitions and were leaping around, daring to believe. It was not to be.Dancing in the rain: Mark Bennett runs in to score a try late onMind the gapAfter a sluggish start, Scotland responded with venom and passion. After several incursions into the Wallaby half. After carrying into the breakdown, Scott Sio and Rob Simmons looked at the ball for a split second, neither gathering it. Pete Horne looked up, thought all his Christmases had come at once, and jogged over the line to dot down under the posts. Michael Cheika would have been seething at the costly indecision.No one around: Pete Horne skips through unopposed to scoreTaking risks often pays offWith the Wallabies trailing 16-10, and 38.27 on the clock, instead of going for the three points, they had enough condifence in the side to go for the corner and take an attacking five-metre lineout. After taking clean ball, they set up a driving maul and wriggled and twisted their way over the line with the irrepressable Michael Hooper to come up with the ball. Five points infinitely better than three.What’s notFoley misses could have proved costlySo inspirational against England with 28 points, Bernard Foley could have cost the Wallabies the World Cup quarter-final. He missed the first three conversions, wasting six points. He will know that if the loses the head-to-head with the tournament’s top points scorer, Nicolas Sanchez next, weekend, the Wallabies could well have a long, premature flight home. It didn’t help that in the second-half his chip in his own 22 was charged down for Tommy Seymour to fly in, in the corner. His late penalty redeemed him to fans, but in truth, he’s had better days.Wayward: Bernard Foley’s missed six points in the first-half could have been costlyGo low or go outAfter handling errors spurned two try-scoring opportunities in the first five minutes – a reoccurring theme through the game – in the ninth minute they didn’t spurn a third opportunity. Tevita Kuridrani, all 16st of him, powered into Seymour, who went high but was bounced off by the centre who then released Adam Ashley-Cooper to scamper in for his 33rd try in 111 appearances.Sloppy WallabiesSeveral times in the game, Australia made sloppy, uncharacteristic errors, trying complex moves out wide without getting the basic execution right. A case in point was when Scotland were down to 14-men and the ball had been worked wide to score a simple try. Beale’s pass was forward denying Ashley-Cooper a try to put clear distance between the sides. Simple execution was all that was required but they fluffed their lines. Two intercept tries, when they were in their own half will also mean Michael Cheika will be having stern words behind closed doors.Letter of the lawOkay, so a deliberate knock-on is a slightly harsh yellow-card by the letter of the law, but a slo-motion replay makes every action look foolhardy and Sean Maitland will be rueing his handiwork, with the referee deciding he had stopped a try-scoring opportunity. Scotland will feel hard done-by as the Wallabies ran up 10 precious points in his absence.Man of the Match: Matt Giteau (Aus)Referee: Craig Joubert (SA) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In control: Adam Ashley-Cooper scores the first Wallaby try Cons: Greig Laidlaw (2)Pens: Greig Laidlaw (5)last_img read more

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Rugby World Cup 2019 repêchage lowdown

first_imgThe venueAll matches will be at Marseille’s 5,000-capacity Stade Delort.The coverageWorld Rugby will live stream all the games online at world.rugby in the UK and they will be televised in some countries. Find out all the details here… Ultimate goal: Canada have competed in every World Cup to date (Getty Images) The fixtures (kick-off times UK & Ireland)Sunday 11 November Canada 65-19 KenyaHong Kong 9-26 GermanySaturday 17 NovemberHong Kong v Kenya (noon)Canada v Germany (3pm)Friday 23 NovemberKenya v Germany (5pm)Hong Kong v Canada (8pm) All you need to know about how the final Japan 2019 place will be decided Hong Kong are the highest-ranked team, sitting two places above Canada at 21st in the world. The Asia Rugby Championship winners defeated Cook Islands 77-3 on aggregate over two legs to secure their place in the repêchage and are coached by Welshman Leigh Jones. They are well organised and defensively strong – Jones’s credentials include taking charge of Japan’s defence during RWC 2015.Germany, who moved into the repêchage after losing to Samoa in a play-off and are ranked 29th, have bolstered their challenge by bringing in ex-England defence coach Mike Ford as head coach.The Kenyans, 28th in the world, complete the foursome. They finished second behind Namibia in the Africa Gold Cup and have lots of attacking threats, having pulled in players from their sevens ranks. Rugby World Cup 2019 repêchage lowdown Over the next three weekends, four countries will fight it out for the final spot at next year’s Rugby World Cup.Canada, Germany, Hong Kong and Kenya will all play each other in the repêchage qualifying tournament in Marseille in a bid to book their place at Japan 2019.Canada lock Brett Beukeboom recognises the size of the challenge that awaits in the South of France, saying: “This is our last shot of getting into the 2019 World Cup. It’s a big test for us and is going to be really tough. We have to play our best rugby and turn around recent results.Last chance: Germany lost to Samoa in a World Cup play-off in the summer (Getty Images)“Those are three good teams and they have improved fantastically in recent times, so we need to approach each game as do or die. That adds a bit more stress as a player. With that being said, the onus is on the players to prepare right for each team and approach November with the right attitude.”Here is all the information you need about this month’s repêchage tournament…The formatThe repêchage tournament has a round-robin format, with all teams playing each other. It’s four points for a win, two for a draw, zero for a loss. Bonus points will be given to teams scoring four tries and losing sides finishing within seven points.If two teams finish level on points, the result of the match between those sides will separate them. If that was a draw, the team with the better points difference across all games will be ranked higher.The teamsCanada, Germany, Hong Kong and Kenya all have a chance of securing the 20th – and final – spot at next year’s World Cup, in Pool B alongside New Zealand, South Africa, Italy and Namibia.The Canucks have suffered a severe drop in form at 15-a-side level in recent years, winning just eight of 30 Tests since RWC 2015. They may be World Cup regulars, but none of the other teams have taken part in the global showpiece before.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Everything to play for. @OfficialKRU are preparing for the tournament of their lives as the repechage to decide who takes the final @RugbyWorldCup spot begins on Sunday in Marseille… pic.twitter.com/4K7ibJeEZe— World Rugby (@WorldRugby) November 7, 2018 TAGS: Canada This article originally appeared in the December 2018 issue of Rugby World.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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USA Rugby World Cup bids given green light

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. USA Rugby World Cup bids given green lightThe United States of America has been accepted as a candidate to host one or more of the upcoming Rugby World Cups in 2027, 2029 and/or 2031, according to the union.Following the completion of an internal feasibility study and having held a ‘World Rugby Dialogue Phase’, the US will officially bid to host the men’s event in 2027 or 2031 and the women’s event in 2029.As it stands, Russia and Australia are also bidding for events, with Australia currently favourites to host the men’s event in 2027.Related: Australia launch 2027 Rugby World Cup bidBack in September, the US said their study would: “focus on objective analysis, financial considerations, technical requirements and stakeholder support across the greater sports landscape. Similar to previous Rugby World Cup host unions, objective analysis will include legacy of the tournament and positive impact for the game of rugby in the United States.” The United States at RWC 2019 (Getty Images) They hope to host an event in 2027, 2029 and/or 2031 Plans Stateside will now ramp up ahead of the January 2022 proposal deadline with World Rugby. On the agenda will be schemes financial planning, event objectives, competitions, stadiums and host cities, player welfare, rugby development, legacy and more. And the Guardian reports that NFL and college American Football stadiums are being considered for potential venues.Ross Young, USA Rugby CEO and former General Manager to Rugby World Cup, said on the official USA Rugby website: “Putting our hand up to host a Rugby World Cup is a benchmark for the game in America.“However, the exciting stages are just now beginning as the stakeholder group continues into campaign planning. The great work this group of subject matter experts, led by former director Jim Brown, has done supersedes what has happened previously at this stage, and truly highlights the potential for a Rugby World Cup being held on American soil.”last_img read more

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Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 7

first_img Rector Collierville, TN By Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Nov 7, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Janine Baalbergen says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 7 [Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] Much happens each day during the Anglican Consultative Council‘s (ACC) 15th meeting. In addition to Episcopal News Service’s other coverage, here’s some of what else went on Nov. 7 (local time), the final day of the Oct. 27-Nov. 7 gathering.The Auckland Fire Department extinguishes a trash bin fire below Holy Trinity Cathedral just after the end of the Anglican Consultative Council’’s closing Eucharist Nov. 7 (local time). ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergWhite smoke over cathedralHoly Trinity Cathedral Organist Philip Smith had just begun Louis Vierne’’s Toccata in B flat minor as the organ voluntary for the closing Eucharist of ACC-15 when smoke alarms began to sound in the cathedral.The altar party and choir had already recessed, and ushers began urging ACC members and other attendees to exit quickly as smoke began to fill the building. They emerged into a cloud of acrid smoke circling the cathedral’’s forecourt and wafting over the roof.A trash bin in the lower car park at the back of the cathedral was smoking and the Auckland Fire Department was already extinguishing the smoky fire by the time people had left the cathedral above.On a day filled with rumors of the impending announcement of Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan William’s’ successor, one Anglican priest of the province urged his fellow bystanders not to interpret the smoke as a signal of a new archbishop.ACC-16 will meet in Province of Central AfricaAnglican Communion Secretary General Kenneth Kearon told the council that the 16th meeting of the ACC will be held in May 2016 in the home province of its chair Diocese of Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga.“We’re very grateful that you have accepted the invitation to come to the Church of the Province of Central Africa,” Diocese of Lusaka Bishop David Njovu, who is also an ACC member, told the council.The bishop predicted that the meeting will be “transformational” both for Anglicans in the province and for those visiting Anglicans who will experience the “vibrant” church in Central Africa, which he said united even though it is in a “hostile environment.”Njovu asked for the council continued prayers for Anglicans in Zimbabwe, which is part of the province. The Anglican Church in Zimbabwe has been under attack from the excommunicated bishop, Nolbert Kunonga, since 2007. Kunonga, with the support of police and henchmen, has seized church property and used violence and intimidation to break up church services. In a 2011 media interview, Kunonga was quoted as saying he aimed to control the 3,000 Anglican churches, schools, hospitals and other properties in Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana and Malawi, which make up the province. At the end of 2011, the archbishops of Canterbury, Central Africa, Southern Africa and Tanzania met with President of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe and presented him with a dossier that outlined how Anglicans have been persecuted over the years.“The persecutions that the church in Zimbabwe has gone through” has made it stronger and “their faith has grown,” said Njovu. “We are looking to Zimbabwe for how to deal with situations like the one they have.”Press briefing harkens back to royal weddingThe first question to Archbishop Rowan Williams at an afternoon press briefing that included local Auckland media concerned what it was like to preside at royal weddings.Williams said the pre-marital counseling time he spent with Prince William and Duchess of Cambridge Catherine “was pretty much what I do with any young couple and because they’re a young couple fairly typical of their generation, that was in its way challenging, interesting and very moving.”The archbishop said he also told the couple that even if they were aware as they walked up the aisle that five billion people were watching, “when you get to the sanctuary it won’t feel like that, you’ll be looking at each other, your families and, unfortunately, you’ll be looking at me, and that’s what it is going to be about.”The marriage service “was a really extraordinary platform for talking nationally and internationally about marriage, about how the church sees marriage and about the significance of this commitment,” he said.Resolutions passed by council todayIn addition to the resolutions reported here, the council also acted on:Resolution 15.24, which endorses “Christian Witness in a Multi-Religious World” from the World Council of Churches; encourages all provinces to study, assess their current practice of Christian witness and develop practices to suit their local context in light of its recommendations; recommends that provinces discuss the report with other faith communities.Resolution 15.25, which thanks members of the Theological Education in the Anglican Communion Working Group, receives its report and calls for it to be widely circulated, notes that its recommendations “cannot be implemented within the present budget priorities of the Anglican Communion” and recommends that outside funding be sought for a commission of theological education and a director.Resolution 15.33, which welcomes the Canterbury Statement of the International Anglican Liturgical Consultation “Rite Relating to Marriage” (available via a link here) and commends it to the provinces for study.Resolution 15.36, which requests the secretary general of the Anglican Communion to ensure the increased participation of lay people in all of the ACC’s commissions, councils, committees, working groups and other bodies.Resolution 15.37, which requests the secretary general of the Anglican Communion to identify practical strategies to support provinces whose people are suffering with respect to land disputes and conflicts between agricultural and pastoral communities; the “trade in small arms, their diffusion and misuse”; border disputes; narcotics and alcohol abuse; youth unemployment and crime; trafficking, abduction and abuse of children and women for rituals, forced labor and forced marriages; and communicate these strategies to the provinces as soon as they are developed.Resolution 15.41, which authorizes the chair, vice chair and secretary to issue a letter of thanks to all who assisted in “making this council’s meeting so fruitful for us all.”All ACC-15 resolutions are due to be posted here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing November 7, 2012 at 7:16 am OK, that may be the most memorable part of ACC15 for our bishop, who has been a volunteer member of the Auckland Fire Brigade for at least 20 years. His fellow firefighters will surely never allow him to forget this one….. One just wonders where he was when this went down: in the Cathedral or on the firetruck….? Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) Anglican Consultative Council In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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In Canada, first joint assembly for Anglicans, Lutherans is a…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Comments (1) Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA July 2, 2013 at 8:05 pm Greetings to The Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada as you meet together in this historic moment. I an the Lutheran half of an Episcopal – Lutheran clergy couple and the first ELCA pastor placed in charge of an Episcopal parish under the agreement, Called to Common Mission, in Minnesota, from Dec 2001 – February 2013. Rev. Constance Claxton and I will be keeping you in our prayers as you do this new thing!Peace be with you both,Rev. Roger C. Claxton Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Canada Joint Assembly, In Canada, first joint assembly for Anglicans, Lutherans is a milestone Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Jul 2, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Part of the Joint Assembly of representatives of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is a public witness event on Ottawa’s Parliament Hill on July 6. The event will focus on access to clean water. Photo: Shutterstock.[Anglican Journal] The Joint Assembly of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is a watershed moment in the full communion relationship of the two churches. This is the first time the national governing bodies of the two churches are meeting together. While it is a time to celebrate 12 years in full communion, the gathering also aims to challenge both churches to do more, as the theme says, “together for the love of the world.”There are 291 Anglican delegates and 274 Lutheran delegates. When they all gather in the Canada Hall of the Ottawa Convention Centre, they will sit at 84 tables. They will meet, eat and worship together, but they will separate into the Anglican General Synod and the ELCIC National Convention for matters that require votes by each legal body.The gathering officially begins with a Eucharist service in the Canada Hall on July 2 at 1:30 p.m. Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and Bishop Susan Johnson, national bishop of the ELCIC, will then deliver a joint report. A community building session next is intended to help people get to know each other while stimulating their creativity with some art projects. The evening sessions will include the keynote address from the Rev. Christopher Duraisingh and a presentation on homelessness and affordable housing.In the following four days, Anglican and Lutheran members will spend their mornings together. After morning devotions on July 4 and 5, there will be greetings from representatives of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran World Federation, the Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the World Council of Churches. Members will hear reports from the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission, aboriginal groups, the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund and Canadian Lutheran World Relief, as well as a presentation on responsible resource extraction. Finally, members will be asked to approve a joint assembly declaration on the issues of homelessness and responsible resource extraction.On the morning of July 6, there will be a public witness event devoted to the issue of access to clean water, particularly in aboriginal communities. That evening all will come together for a banquet.The event will close with a summation, reflections and a Eucharist service on Sunday morning, July 7. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rev. Roger C. Claxton says: Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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Standing in the need of prayer for missing reporter David…

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 24, 2014 January 24, 2014 at 5:45 pm All Saints, Millington NJ – Loving your neighbors with no prerequisites. AMEN. Matthew Read says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET David Bird, 55, did not return from what he reportedly told his wife would be a short walk on Jan. 11, triggering a massive search and investigation that now involves the FBI. Photo: Facebook/Long Hill Township Police Department[Episcopal News Service] Residents of Millington, New Jersey, have turned to the local All Saints Episcopal Church as a prayerful gathering place as they await word on the fate of a missing Wall Street Journal reporter who lives with his family near the church.Local residents seeking out the comfort of All Saints is an outgrowth of the parish’s sense of call to what its rector describes as “community hospitality.” The nearly 110-year-old church about 38 miles from Midtown Manhattan follows “the old village church model” whose sense of caring for a parish extends beyond members of the church to all residents of the area, according to the Rev. Victoria Geer McGrath.Missing Wall Street Journal reporter David Bird. Photo: Facebook/Long Hill Township Police DepartmentAbout 12 hours after David Bird, 55, did not return from what he reportedly told his wife would be a short walk on Jan. 11, McGrath was on her way to church for Sunday worship when she got a phone call from parish administrator Susie Harris telling her that Bird was missing and asking that she put him and his family on that morning’s prayer list. While McGrath was presiding at the 10 a.m. Eucharist, Harris was in her church office making missing-person fliers.Bird covers energy markets, including OPEC, for the Wall Street Journal and has worked for Dow Jones for more than 20 years, according to a Journal report.While the Birds are not members of All Saints – they worship at the Roman Catholic church in town – they are well known to All Saints members, and not just because they live in the neighborhood. David Bird serves as the troop committee chair for Boy Scout Troop 56 of which All Saints is the chartering organization and Nancy Bird leads a Girl Scout troop that meets at the parish. David Bird has helped connect the Boy Scouts with All Saints service projects. For example, scouts always help set up for the church’s large annual outdoor rummage sale.“Just kind of being good neighbors together,” is how McGrath described the relationship in an interview.All Saints Episcopal Church in Millington, New Jersey practices “community hospitality” and recently became a center for prayer as the surrounding community awaits word on the fate of a missing Wall Street Journal reporter who lives with his family near the church. Photo: Facebook/Long Hill Township Police DepartmentThe Birds’ daughter and son, a middle schooler and a high schooler, are friends with many children in the parish, she said. After confirmation class the day after Bird went missing, All Saints high school members searched for Bird in some of the areas where they knew he liked to run and hike.The parish’s relationship with the Birds is a long-standing one. When David Bird needed a liver transplant nine years ago, All Saints members contributed to a fundraising effort.On Jan. 13 – a day during which All Saints was the site of a funeral and reception for a six-year-old member of the parish who died of cardiac arrest – McGrath got a call from a parishioner who was trying to connect a friend of the Birds with Harris. The Birds’ friend reported that Nancy Bird was “completely overwhelmed” with offers for help and that all she wanted people to do was to pray that her husband will be found and can come home.Because so many community activities happen at All Saints, the friend’s “first thought” was that that would be the place to have the service, she said. McGrath agreed to host the service and then learned they hoped to have it that evening. Church and community members pitched in to make the service happen after people saw announcements on the church’s website, Facebook, and a telephone tree run by the Boy Scouts.Close to 200 people gathered that evening outside All Saints, which sits prominently at a five-way intersection. Luminaries lined the triangle of All Saints land, the Scouts came in uniform and two of them were the readers (reading Isaiah 40:28-31 and 1 Corinthians 13:4-7).That service was followed by a quieter prayer vigil at All Saints on Jan. 18, marking a week since Bird’s disappearance. Harris, the parish administrator, suggested that the church announce it would be open for prayer between 4-5 p.m., the time when Bird left his home for his walk.Most of the 40 people who came were not parishioners. Those folks said they “felt like there was a place to put their anxiety and their worry, and also their sadness because a week out people were feeling like this may not go the way we hope it would go,” according to McGrath.All Saints sent the Jan. 19 altar flowers to Nancy Bird. That gesture followed up on McGrath’s call on Nancy Bird the day after David went missing.But the rector said she has been trying to be clear that All Saints is not seeking to usurp the pastoral role of the Birds’ parish priests.“This was really all driven by the wider community coming to us and asking for a response, which we’re glad to do,” she said.Nancy Bird has said that the couple was putting away Christmas decorations when her husband said he wanted to take a quick walk before an expected rainstorm. He left the house at 4:30 p.m. and didn’t take his phone. It has been reported that Bird, a marathoner, frequently hiked in an area near his home called the Hicks Tract in the Millington section of Long Hill Township, New Jersey. The area is near the Passaic River, which flooded some backwater swamps after a large downpour later that day. It was in the midst of that storm when Bird did not return home that his wife reported him missing.David Bird was recovering from a gastrointestinal virus the day he went missing, according to his wife. He is a liver-transplant recipient and takes medication twice a day. His wife has said he could become ill without the medication.A massive search effort began shortly after Bird was reported missing and has included personnel from surrounding municipalities, along with the New Jersey State Police, on foot, horseback and all-terrain vehicles, and in the air. Divers have searched icy waters and others walked railroad track. Authorities have also reviewed footage from business and resident surveillance cameras in the area in hopes of spotting Bird. They have also asked residents and business owners to check any place on their properties where a person might take refuge.The Federal Bureau of Investigation confirmed Jan. 20 that it was helping the Long Hill Township Police Department in its search for Bird, FoxNews.com reported.First Assistant Morris County Prosecutor Thomas Zelante told ENS on Jan. 23 that the police department “continues to receives leads from various independent sources around the region and the department is taking all leads seriously and following up on the information.”Meanwhile small teams of searchers are retracing previously searched areas to help ensure that clues have not been overlooked, he said. Those searchers are not looking in any new areas, Zelante added.Meanwhile, despite a massive snowstorm on Jan. 20 and 21 and dangerously cold weather since, the effort “has not changed from a search and rescue” operation, he said.Bird is described as white, 6 feet 1 inch tall and weighing about 200 pounds. He is partially balding and has a gray beard. He was last seen wearing a bright red rain jacket with two yellow zippers.A massive search-and-rescue effort to find missing Wall Street Journal reporter David Bird has included searches in icy rivers and streams near his New Jersey home. Photo: Facebook/Long Hill Township Police DepartmentWhile it might seem obvious that Bird’s neighborhood church would be a place to which people turn in a time of crisis, it is also true that All Saints and McGrath have focused on fostering connections with the wider community. She traces the effort to 2007 when the parish decided to close its pre-school nursery because of declining enrollment. The school had met in the separate parish hall building so the parish had to “think and pray about how God wanted us to use the parish house,” McGrath said.During that discernment the parish realized that its parking lot was heavily used and needed repaving. They saw that neighbors used the lot for overflow parking, especially when they had parties, and that it is a school bus stop as well as a place where younger kids meet to walk to the elementary school. It is also the place where many teenagers get their first driving lesson and learn how to park, McGrath said. Truck drivers and utility workers often pull in during the day to eat their lunch.A parishioner offered a $20,000 challenge grant if the parish could raise a comparable amount within six weeks. “So we went to the neighborhood” and the resulting donations, plus those from parishioners, along with a fish-and-chips dinner and a car wash staged by the youth “more than met our match,” McGrath said. A bequest covered the remaining amount needed for the work.“Beyond the money, what it did was it made us really engage with [the questions of] how is the resource of this property being used, how does it function in the community,” McGrath said.Then the same donor offered to help make the parish hall wheelchair-accessible as a way for him to honor his recently deceased wife. That project has, among other things, allowed All Saints to go from hosting three or four small Alcoholics Anonymous groups a week to hosting nine, including a Friday night meeting specifically for young adults.Converting the hall to such use in a town with little community space has been a ministry, McGrath said, adding that parishioners understand that hosting those AA meetings, along with other activities that invite AA members into the life of the parish, is “our primary community outreach.”“It’s not just about offering the building; it’s about offering ourselves as hospitality and we’re always finding new ways of what that actually means,” she said. “One of the things we can do in this very polarized political environment is to build local community bonds so that when there is a concern or issue people already have those bridges that have been built.”McGrath and the congregation are clear about why it practices community hospitality.“As important as this kind of ministry is, we don’t do it because we think it will help our church grow,” she said. “I think there’s a greater vitality to our parish life but it’s not going to balance the budget. It’s not going to necessarily bring all sorts of new members; that’s not why we do it. The parish understands that that’s not why we do this. If people want to come and join us, that’s great. If they don’t, that’s fine too, but we are doing our part to make the kingdom of God a reality in our own community.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Standing in the need of prayer for missing reporter David Bird Neighbors turn to ‘community hospitality’ parish when friend vanishes Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 24, 2014 at 5:15 pm Lovely story about my brother and his family. One correction: David has a 15-year-old son and a 12-year-old daughter, not two sons. Thank you and God bless you. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing January 25, 2014 at 1:10 am My son and I will be looking for David today. I felt so compelled to help when I heard this on the news last Sunday Night that I sent email to help with my dog. My son came as well. I have been praying for David every day. Please grant my son and I the ability through all of your prayers to find David! God Bless you all and please pray for my son and I in our search tomorrow! -Matthew January 24, 2014 at 5:37 pm Great heart Vicki….Many Blessings,Len Freeman+ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Kathleen Bird says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA February 19, 2014 at 11:01 pm Praying for David’s family in the wake of this tragedy.John Hoben Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (7) Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Leonard Freeman says: Peggy Hodgkins says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Rev. Netha N. Brada + says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI January 24, 2014 at 5:09 pm Would that all of our churches would follow the example of All Saints, Millington NJ. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev’d Persis P Williams says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC John Hoben says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls January 24, 2014 at 6:06 pm Sending prayers for David Bird and his family, along with gratitude for the Rev. Vicki McGrath and her deeply connected community ministry in Millington– “for such a time as this.” An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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