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Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 7

first_img Rector Collierville, TN By Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Nov 7, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Janine Baalbergen says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Consultative Council Digest: Nov. 7 [Episcopal News Service – Auckland, New Zealand] Much happens each day during the Anglican Consultative Council‘s (ACC) 15th meeting. In addition to Episcopal News Service’s other coverage, here’s some of what else went on Nov. 7 (local time), the final day of the Oct. 27-Nov. 7 gathering.The Auckland Fire Department extinguishes a trash bin fire below Holy Trinity Cathedral just after the end of the Anglican Consultative Council’’s closing Eucharist Nov. 7 (local time). ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergWhite smoke over cathedralHoly Trinity Cathedral Organist Philip Smith had just begun Louis Vierne’’s Toccata in B flat minor as the organ voluntary for the closing Eucharist of ACC-15 when smoke alarms began to sound in the cathedral.The altar party and choir had already recessed, and ushers began urging ACC members and other attendees to exit quickly as smoke began to fill the building. They emerged into a cloud of acrid smoke circling the cathedral’’s forecourt and wafting over the roof.A trash bin in the lower car park at the back of the cathedral was smoking and the Auckland Fire Department was already extinguishing the smoky fire by the time people had left the cathedral above.On a day filled with rumors of the impending announcement of Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan William’s’ successor, one Anglican priest of the province urged his fellow bystanders not to interpret the smoke as a signal of a new archbishop.ACC-16 will meet in Province of Central AfricaAnglican Communion Secretary General Kenneth Kearon told the council that the 16th meeting of the ACC will be held in May 2016 in the home province of its chair Diocese of Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga.“We’re very grateful that you have accepted the invitation to come to the Church of the Province of Central Africa,” Diocese of Lusaka Bishop David Njovu, who is also an ACC member, told the council.The bishop predicted that the meeting will be “transformational” both for Anglicans in the province and for those visiting Anglicans who will experience the “vibrant” church in Central Africa, which he said united even though it is in a “hostile environment.”Njovu asked for the council continued prayers for Anglicans in Zimbabwe, which is part of the province. The Anglican Church in Zimbabwe has been under attack from the excommunicated bishop, Nolbert Kunonga, since 2007. Kunonga, with the support of police and henchmen, has seized church property and used violence and intimidation to break up church services. In a 2011 media interview, Kunonga was quoted as saying he aimed to control the 3,000 Anglican churches, schools, hospitals and other properties in Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana and Malawi, which make up the province. At the end of 2011, the archbishops of Canterbury, Central Africa, Southern Africa and Tanzania met with President of Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe and presented him with a dossier that outlined how Anglicans have been persecuted over the years.“The persecutions that the church in Zimbabwe has gone through” has made it stronger and “their faith has grown,” said Njovu. “We are looking to Zimbabwe for how to deal with situations like the one they have.”Press briefing harkens back to royal weddingThe first question to Archbishop Rowan Williams at an afternoon press briefing that included local Auckland media concerned what it was like to preside at royal weddings.Williams said the pre-marital counseling time he spent with Prince William and Duchess of Cambridge Catherine “was pretty much what I do with any young couple and because they’re a young couple fairly typical of their generation, that was in its way challenging, interesting and very moving.”The archbishop said he also told the couple that even if they were aware as they walked up the aisle that five billion people were watching, “when you get to the sanctuary it won’t feel like that, you’ll be looking at each other, your families and, unfortunately, you’ll be looking at me, and that’s what it is going to be about.”The marriage service “was a really extraordinary platform for talking nationally and internationally about marriage, about how the church sees marriage and about the significance of this commitment,” he said.Resolutions passed by council todayIn addition to the resolutions reported here, the council also acted on:Resolution 15.24, which endorses “Christian Witness in a Multi-Religious World” from the World Council of Churches; encourages all provinces to study, assess their current practice of Christian witness and develop practices to suit their local context in light of its recommendations; recommends that provinces discuss the report with other faith communities.Resolution 15.25, which thanks members of the Theological Education in the Anglican Communion Working Group, receives its report and calls for it to be widely circulated, notes that its recommendations “cannot be implemented within the present budget priorities of the Anglican Communion” and recommends that outside funding be sought for a commission of theological education and a director.Resolution 15.33, which welcomes the Canterbury Statement of the International Anglican Liturgical Consultation “Rite Relating to Marriage” (available via a link here) and commends it to the provinces for study.Resolution 15.36, which requests the secretary general of the Anglican Communion to ensure the increased participation of lay people in all of the ACC’s commissions, councils, committees, working groups and other bodies.Resolution 15.37, which requests the secretary general of the Anglican Communion to identify practical strategies to support provinces whose people are suffering with respect to land disputes and conflicts between agricultural and pastoral communities; the “trade in small arms, their diffusion and misuse”; border disputes; narcotics and alcohol abuse; youth unemployment and crime; trafficking, abduction and abuse of children and women for rituals, forced labor and forced marriages; and communicate these strategies to the provinces as soon as they are developed.Resolution 15.41, which authorizes the chair, vice chair and secretary to issue a letter of thanks to all who assisted in “making this council’s meeting so fruitful for us all.”All ACC-15 resolutions are due to be posted here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing November 7, 2012 at 7:16 am OK, that may be the most memorable part of ACC15 for our bishop, who has been a volunteer member of the Auckland Fire Brigade for at least 20 years. His fellow firefighters will surely never allow him to forget this one….. One just wonders where he was when this went down: in the Cathedral or on the firetruck….? Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) Anglican Consultative Council In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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In Canada, first joint assembly for Anglicans, Lutherans is a…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Comments (1) Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA July 2, 2013 at 8:05 pm Greetings to The Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada as you meet together in this historic moment. I an the Lutheran half of an Episcopal – Lutheran clergy couple and the first ELCA pastor placed in charge of an Episcopal parish under the agreement, Called to Common Mission, in Minnesota, from Dec 2001 – February 2013. Rev. Constance Claxton and I will be keeping you in our prayers as you do this new thing!Peace be with you both,Rev. Roger C. Claxton Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Canada Joint Assembly, In Canada, first joint assembly for Anglicans, Lutherans is a milestone Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious By Leigh Anne WilliamsPosted Jul 2, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Part of the Joint Assembly of representatives of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is a public witness event on Ottawa’s Parliament Hill on July 6. The event will focus on access to clean water. Photo: Shutterstock.[Anglican Journal] The Joint Assembly of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is a watershed moment in the full communion relationship of the two churches. This is the first time the national governing bodies of the two churches are meeting together. While it is a time to celebrate 12 years in full communion, the gathering also aims to challenge both churches to do more, as the theme says, “together for the love of the world.”There are 291 Anglican delegates and 274 Lutheran delegates. When they all gather in the Canada Hall of the Ottawa Convention Centre, they will sit at 84 tables. They will meet, eat and worship together, but they will separate into the Anglican General Synod and the ELCIC National Convention for matters that require votes by each legal body.The gathering officially begins with a Eucharist service in the Canada Hall on July 2 at 1:30 p.m. Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, and Bishop Susan Johnson, national bishop of the ELCIC, will then deliver a joint report. A community building session next is intended to help people get to know each other while stimulating their creativity with some art projects. The evening sessions will include the keynote address from the Rev. Christopher Duraisingh and a presentation on homelessness and affordable housing.In the following four days, Anglican and Lutheran members will spend their mornings together. After morning devotions on July 4 and 5, there will be greetings from representatives of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran World Federation, the Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the World Council of Churches. Members will hear reports from the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission, aboriginal groups, the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund and Canadian Lutheran World Relief, as well as a presentation on responsible resource extraction. Finally, members will be asked to approve a joint assembly declaration on the issues of homelessness and responsible resource extraction.On the morning of July 6, there will be a public witness event devoted to the issue of access to clean water, particularly in aboriginal communities. That evening all will come together for a banquet.The event will close with a summation, reflections and a Eucharist service on Sunday morning, July 7. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rev. Roger C. Claxton says: Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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VIDEO: 40 Years On, The Lessons of PREVI

first_imgArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/421490/video-40-years-on-the-lessons-of-previ Clipboard “COPY” VIDEO: 40 Years On, The Lessons of PREVISave this articleSaveVIDEO: 40 Years On, The Lessons of PREVI VIDEO: 40 Years On, The Lessons of PREVI Written by Rory StottAugust 28, 2013 Share “COPY” Videos CopyThe students of the MSArch in Landscape and Urbanism program at Woodbury University in San Diego have shared this video on Proyecto Experimental de Vivienda (PREVI): a late 1960s social housing experiment in Lima, Peru, which, backed by the Peruvian government and the UN, involved the best social housing architects of the day.The designs, part of the later, more humanist strain of modernism, were intended to allow families – who were used to holding complete control over the construction of their own homes – to appropriate the houses. However, they were also designed to imply how future construction might prevent the proliferation of chaos present in previous slums. The video asks how residents feel about their experimental homes today, questioning the success of this design strategy, 40 years after the project’s completion. Find out more about the outcome of the PREVI experiment, after the break… The video finds happy residents, praising the tranquility and safety of the neighborhood – almost unrecognizable from the original images, with bright colors and sometimes haphazard extensions. But the video also involves local architects, who do have criticisms: “for those who think in terms of architectural purism, it’s a failure because the way the types were thought to grow, doesn’t get applied,” says one. Another adds: “I think there’s an excess of willpower to express your identity, your individuality into a building… I think it’s legitimate, but there’s a limit.” In an article for Domus, Justin McGuirk discusses PREVI and also notes the failure of the ‘guidelines’ for extension: “[Aldo van Eyck] took a more proscriptive approach to how the owners should expand, creating diagonally walled courtyards to discourage people building on top of them. He failed of course. Outdoor space is not sacred to a family of eight with another generation on the way.”But McGuirk also sees PREVI as the prototype for many modern architects looking into social housing today. Urban Think Tank is one example, whom McGuirk worked with on their Golden-Lion-Winning project at the Venice Biennale in 2012. Another example is Chilean practice Elemental, particularly their ‘half a house’ model for social housing. As the example of PREVI becomes ever more applicable in the current climate, the investigations of the students at Woodbury University becomes increasingly relevant.Three Teams Shortlisted to Design Denmark’s Largest HospitalArchitecture NewsChildren’s Playhouse ‘Sam + Pam’ / Office Of Mcfarlane Biggar Architects + Designers…Selected Projects Share CopyAbout this authorRory StottAuthorFollow#TagsNewsVideosResidential ArchitectureSocial HousingPeruLimaPublic Interest DesignWoodbury UniversityCite: Rory Stott. “VIDEO: 40 Years On, The Lessons of PREVI” 28 Aug 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abstract EarthPartitionsSkyfoldMarkerboard Finish for Folding WallsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesKingspan Insulated PanelsInsulated Wall Panels – Designwall R-seriesWoodBruagRoom Acoustics – Interior Cladding PanelsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMBricksNelissenSpecial Bricks – Slips and HalvesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta cladding in Le TrèfleEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEASideboardsUSMLow Shelving – HallerTable LampsLeds-C4Lighting – ElampMore products »Please enable JavaScript to view thecomments powered by Disqus.Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/421490/video-40-years-on-the-lessons-of-previ Clipboardlast_img read more

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Pilot programme launches to foster diversity in arts & cultural organisation boards

first_imgPilot programme launches to foster diversity in arts & cultural organisation boards Tagged with: Training trustees Clore Leadership, Cause4 and the Arts Fundraising & Philanthropy Programme are partnering in a pilot programme that aims to improve the diversity of arts and cultural organisations’ boards, and to support trustees in their new roles. The programme, which aims to create the ‘Trustee Board Bank of the Future’, has been made possible through funding from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and Arts Council England.It will see Cause4 run two training courses in early 2020 covering the key trustee responsibilities, financial obligations and fundraising expectations. They will aim to equip participants with everything they need to know to become an effective charity trustee, and will take place in Birmingham and Leeds, with Cause4 working with local partners to find participants from diverse communities, as well as those with existing fundraising and digital skills.Alongside this training, Clore Leadership will recruit cultural and creative organisations to deliver two Good Governance events to help charities induct new trustees, are supportive, compliant and build a culture of effective governance. Clore Leadership will issue a call for organisations to be part of this programme in late 2019.Michelle Wright, Chief Executive and Founder of Cause4 said: “Charities need trustees that reflect the diverse communities they represent. In this new initiative with Clore Leadership we are looking to embed change, firstly by only appointing trustees that have been trained in their responsibilities and secondly using Clore’s expertise in supporting charities in good practice in induction and onboarding, meaning that new Trustees are supported into their roles and have a good experience.”Hilary Carty, Director of Clore Leadership added: Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1  317 total views,  2 views today Melanie May | 26 November 2019 | News  318 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 “Governance in the arts and culture sector is a topic of great importance to us; it’s the main reason why Clore Leadership convened the Cultural Governance Alliance in 2018, and why we’re delighted to be partnering with Cause4, a CGA steering group member, on this Board Matching Pilot. Cause4 understands the need for diversity of experience and thought on the boards of cultural organisations and we are very excited about the changes this pilot will continue to drive in our sector.” About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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TCU intramurals helps bring the ‘madness’ to campus

first_imgTwitter Kacey is a junior journalism major from Friendswood, Texas. She is a managing editor for TCU360. TCU falls to Georgia in AutoZone Liberty Bowl ReddIt Basketball fans fill out brackets every March, dreaming of making 64 out of 64 correct picks. Kramer claims 100th career win ReddIt Linkedin Facebook TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello Kacey Bowen Support for seniors on Senior Day Twitter TCU vs Georgia: “Playing to win” Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Linkedin Previous articleThe109: Berry Good Buys gets facelift from Amon G. Carter FoundationNext articleNew Catholic School to open in Fort Worth Kacey Bowen RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printWhen basketball fans hear March, one thought follows: madness.March Madness is the NCAA basketball tournament that runs throughout the entire month of March. Fans make brackets, choose how their favorite teams will fare, then cheer them on along the entire way.TCU intramurals has been taking part in this “madness” by holding a bracket challenge for students, faculty and staff.Assistant Director of Campus Recreation Sheldon Tate said there are a handful of things people get excited about, and March Madness brackets are one of them.“We try to make sure what we are offering is reflective of what students are passionate about,” Tate said.He said with this bracket challenge, they are able to reach students, faculty and staff, who enjoy playing basketball, but also those want to participate by only submitting a bracket.When the bracket challenge started, there were only around 70 brackets, said Stephanie Milligan, intramural supervisor. This year, Milligan said there were more than 205 submissions.Tate said this the bracket competition is a great way for people to get involved.“The program has grown exponentially every year,” Tate said. “We hope it continues.”The majority of participants are students, but Tate said the staff and faculty get involved in their “little pods.”“All they have to do is fill it [the bracket] out,” Tate said.Intramurals keeps track with the brackets and percentages on ESPN’s March Madness website. Milligan said they have closed bracket groups and individuals can submit up to two brackets. Once they submit their brackets, they are free just to let them “run their course.”She said the popularity of the brackets deepens people’s desire to compete. Participants might not be great athletes, but thinking through a bracket or having fun choosing teams keeps the competition alive, Milligan said.She said by implementing a two-bracket system, people make a more serious one and a “what if” one.The NCAA March Madness Tournament concludes with the championship game on April 4. The TCU bracket challenge winner gets a t-shirt, Milligan said. + posts Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Facebooklast_img read more

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Police release 49 journalists after holding them for 22 hours

first_img RSF_en NepalAsia – Pacific At around 3 p.m. today, police released the 49 journalists who were detained while demonstrating yesterday in Kathmandu’s Ratna Park, which has been declared out of bounds for protesters. Reporters Without Borders reiterated its support for the demonstrations by Nepalese journalists to demand the restoration of press freedom.”No explanation was provided by the police to justify these arrests,” said Binod Dhungel, a member of the Federation of Nepalese journalists (FNJ) and former employee of the radio news agency Communication Corner, who was held at the Kamalpokhari police station with 11 other journalists. Some of them were put in a cell with suspected criminal offenders.When another demonstration was held this morning in the southwestern town of Nepalgunj, police detained all the participants, about 30 journalists, and took them to the police station. Among the FNJ members held were Prem K.C., the correspondent of Nepal Television, Jhalak Gaire of the daily Kaalprishtha and Jaya Narayan Shah of the weekly Bimarsh. They were all released a few hours later.Sources said the authorities were on the point of issuing formal arrest warrants for some of the journalists detained in Kathmandu, which could have resulted in their being kept in custody for three months. But the authorities were said to have desisted for fear of triggering more protests in Nepal and abroad. May 29, 2019 Find out more Organisation ___________________________________________________13.06.2005New waves of arrests of protesting journalistsPolice detained more than 100 journalists today with an accompanying sharp increase in violence, confirming that indiscriminate arrests of large numbers of journalists is becoming the standard response to peaceful demonstrations calling for the restoration of press freedom, Reporters Without Borders said.”The authorities are clearly stepping up their crackdown, using large numbers of well-organised anti-riot and plain-clothes police,” the press freedom organisation said with alarm. “The way these protests are being crushed shows the authorities are ready to use brute force against those who want democracy.”The first wave of arrests today came when a peaceful protest to demand press freedom was held this morning at Banepa, in the Kathmandu suburb of Kavre. Launched by the Kavre branch of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists (FNJ), the demonstration was dispersed by baton-wielding police when participants tried to enter an area declared out of bounds for protesters.Around 40 journalists, jurists, intellectuals and other activists were arrested and held for more than six hours. They included the president of the FNJ’s Kavre branch, Ishwori Ojha, its former president, Bhojraj Timilsina, and Kavre Times editor R. L. Shramjivi.In a show of solidarity with their Kavre colleagues, FNJ members then took to the streets in the centre of Kathmandu to denounce all the press freedom violations since King Gyanendra assumed full powers on 1 February. They were beaten with batons when their entered the area adjoining the royal palace where demonstrations are forbidden.A total of 49 of the protesters were bundled into public buses that had been requisitioned by the police and were taken off to three different police stations in the capital.Twenty-three journalists were still being held at the end of the day at the Janasewa police station, including FNJ president Bishnu Nithuri and FNJ secretary Balaram Baniya. Fifteen were being held at the Singha Durbar police station, including FNJ general secretary Mahendra Bista. And 11 others were being held at the Kamalpokhari police station, including FNJ member Binod Dhungel, who used to work for the Communication Corner radio news agency. News Under Chinese pressure, Nepal sanctions three journalists over Dalai Lama story Help by sharing this information Nepalese journalists threatened, attacked and censored over Covid-19 coverage News June 14, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Police release 49 journalists after holding them for 22 hours News Receive email alerts June 8, 2020 Find out more News to go further NepalAsia – Pacific Nepal: RSF’s recommendations to amend controversial Media Council Bill Follow the news on Nepal May 17, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

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Ceremony Marks Ecological Achievements of South Pasadena’s Garfield Park

first_img Subscribe Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Events Previews Ceremony Marks Ecological Achievements of South Pasadena’s Garfield Park From STAFF REPORTS | Photography courtesy BILL GLAZIER, South Pasadena Now Published on Friday, February 27, 2015 | 2:57 am South Pasadena is often described as a walkable, family-friendly community with great public schools. Add to that, South Pasadena has also gained a reputation for being a little city that does big things. South Pasadena is at it again and in conjunction with the American Green Zone Alliance (AGZA) held a special ceremony Thursday at Garfield Park (Mission Street at Park Avenue) to celebrate the momentous accomplishment of having become the first municipal park in the country maintained one hundred percent gas and emissions free.“This is a huge accomplishment for our city and our residents. Visitors to Garfield Park will reap the benefits of not having to breathe all of the pollutants spewing from gas-powered lawn equipment,” said City Councilmember Michael Cacciotti.Only battery-electric lawn equipment and hand tools are used at Garfield Park, which is located in a residential neighborhood.Garfield Park is home to many special events including concerts in the park and is enjoyed daily by many families and their pets.“After working for more than two years, it’s great that this day is finally here. I want to thank my fellow councilmembers and look forward to the day when all of our city facilities are declared a green zone,” added Cacciotti, who also serves on the Governing Board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Top of the News 31 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it More Cool Stuff Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Herbeauty8 Celebrities People Don’t Love AnymoreHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Secrets That Eastern Women Swear By To Stay Young LongerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyJennifer Lopez And Alex Rodriguez’s Wedding DelayedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Ways To Get Into Shape You’ve Never Tried BeforeHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

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What You Should Know Before You Come Face-to-Face With a Bear in Your Backyard

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News News Feature Stories What You Should Know Before You Come Face-to-Face With a Bear in Your Backyard By BRANDON VILLALOVOS | Photographs courtesy EATON CANYON NATURE CENTER Published on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 | 7:02 pm Make a comment Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News HerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Is What Happens To Your Face After DermaplaningHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Beauty Secrets Only Indian Women KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRemove Belly Fat Without Going Under The KnifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeauty Editor’s Note:  Bears of some sort have lived in California for thousands of years. For example, the short-faced bear (Arctodus spp.) is an extinct bear that inhabited North America during the Pleistocene epoch until 11,000 years ago and their remains have been found in the La Brea tar pits. Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Bear sightings this time of year have become the norm for the San Gabriel Valley. Even so, Monday evening’s sighting of a large bear in northeast Pasadena near the Eaton Canyon Golf Course seemed to have startled and unnerved some residents.The bear was first spotted at Riviera Drive and Sierra Madre Boulevard at 7 p.m. and was seen again on Rim Road off Sierra Madre Boulevard, Pasadena Police Lt. John Luna said.“He went over a twelve foot wall like it was no big deal,” said Elizabeth Holland, a Hasting Ranch resident who said she was frightened to see the black bear roaming her back yard.Bears have lived in California for thousands of years and the black bear population has actually been increasing, according to the state. The California Department of Fish & Game estimates there are from 16,000 to 24,000 bears throughout the state.It is a good idea for residents to be “in the know” just in case they happen to encounter one of these these indigenous local omnivores.“Majority of the bears we see around here are second generation bears that are taught to go through trash as a food source,” explained Kim Bosell, Natural Areas Adminstrator at The L.A. County Department of Parks and Recreation.These bears have learned to exist close to homes that have routine trash pickups and easy access to canyons and the open areas where bears live.“Bears know when it’s trash day. It’s their natural habitat so you can’t blame them for showing their faces,” said Lisa Derderian, Pasadena Fire Department Public Information Officer.The bears that roam the nearby foothills are black bears by species, despite the fact their fur coats range in color from blond to black. Most black bears in the San Gabriel Valley are actually brown in color (as was Monday’s).The average size of a male black bear ranges from 350 to 400 pounds, while females average slightly smaller, from 200 to 250 pounds.While trash is the obvious draw that attracts these bears to residences, other features such as bird feeders and koi ponds tend to be easy food sources that attract the hungry bears.“Bears are quite lazy when it comes to gathering food, which is why they go to things like trash cans and bird feeders: because it’s easy. They aren’t known to hunt down animals or people,” said Bosell.This is a relief for worried residents who fear being mauled or having a pet whisked away in the paws of a black bear — whose curved claws are normally one to two inches in length. Historically speaking, there has only been one recorded death by a bear in California and that dates back to the nineteenth century. The typically bear’s diet consists of vegetation, insects and fruit, with only five percent accounted for by consuming meat.Simply put, bears are used to the human population and just want to munch on scraps that are readily available. For residents who have had close encounters with these bears, it’s still a fright even after you know that bears flee in 95 percent of all cases in which they come too close to people.“It’s not cute and it’s not funny to see it in person at your home. The bear seemed like it knew the place,” said Holland.Experts do warn that if you cannot keep your distance and a black bear directly approaches you, you should try to demonstrate to the bear that you may be a danger to it. Make yourself appear larger, stand up, raise your arms and open your jacket. Yell and create a commotion.In efforts to keep these animals away from your home, the Pasadena Humane Society has outlined some basic tips to discourage bears from visiting your property.• Do not put out trash cans the night before pick up• Store garbage cans in a garage or shed• Keep garbage cans clean. Disinfect with ammonia or bleach.• Promptly collect fruit that falls from trees. Harvest fruit as soon as it’s ripe.• Remove plants that attract bears, such as any berries including Dogwood.• Eliminate bird feeders during spring and summer when there are natural foods available for birds.• Eliminate compost piles.• Keep barbecue grills clean and free of drippings.• Consider purchasing bear spray and keep it at your front/back door.According Bosell, wildlife officials and law enforcement often engage in practices called hazing which are efforts employed to guide black bears back into the wild when sighted in residential areas. Bears can only be tranquilized and relocated during hunting season under California law.Residents are urged to alert law enforcement or the Humane Society if they see a bear in their neighborhood, and to also refrain from trying to get to close to the animal.“Leave it to the professionals,” said Derderian.For more information and tips about bear safety and prevention, visit www.pasadenahumane.org. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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The end of Jason’s journey

first_imgFacebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Jason Corbett pictured with his two children Jack (10) and Sarah (8)by Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up AS JASON Corbett’s body was brought back to Limerick on this Thursday morning, a custody battle was looming over the future of his two Irish-born children left traumatised by their father’s death in a domestic incident at their North Carolina home last week.On Sunday, August 2, police and emergency paramedics responding to an emergency call found the 39 year-old Limerick businessman in his home with serious head injuries.The fatal injuries were sustained as a result of what local police say was “a blunt force trauma to the head”.But in the wake of that tragedy, Mr Corbett’s two children are now at the centre of a bitter custody battle between their legal guardians and the chief suspect in the Limerick man’s killing.Having left her holiday in France, Tracey Lynch, Jason’s sister, went to the US where she has led the fight to get both her brother’s body and his two children home to Ireland. She says she wants a quick resolution to the issue to allow her grieve her bother’s violent death.And the Corbett family have vowed that they will not bury Jason until they have full custody of his two children.This Friday, a judge is to decide the outcome of the custody hearing over the guardianship of Jack and Sarah Corbett who have been living in the home where their father was killed last week.Mr Corbett’s second wife, Molly Martens, who is a US citizen was granted temporary custody of the two young children whose father was killed in what local police have described as a “domestic disturbance”.A police spokesman said they are not looking outside the family home for anyone else in connection with Mr Corbett’s death.Jack and Sarah’s legal guardians are his sister Tracey and her husband David Lynch and the family members who have remained home in Limerick say they are desperate for news of developments that will finally see Jason laid to rest and his children back on Irish soil.It is understood that there has been very little contact with the children and their extended Limerick family since their father’s death.Ms Lynch said that Jason left written instructions asking that his children return to Ireland in the event of his death.“It’s what Jason wanted. Jason left instructions that my husband and I would be the guardians of Jack and Sarah.”Speaking from North Carolina on Tuesday night, Ms Lynch said that she was getting to grips with the legal process and she was hopeful of a positive outcome.“I have confidence in the system here, that they will allow Jack and Sarah to come home. They’re Irish citizens, they’re on their dad’s work visa and they’ve no relatives in America.“All of Jason’s family and friends, the children’s biological grandparents, both sets, are in Ireland waiting for us to come home with Jack and Sarah.”She said that her brother loved his family and friends.“He wanted to come home. We’re just here trying to give Jason a voice. I know what his wishes were.“I’m heartbroken, and I want to go home and be allowed to grieve the loss of one of the most important people in my world with my family.”Mr Corbett who moved to the US four years ago and after the death of his first wife Mags in 2006 from a asthma attack, died at his home in Panther Creek Court, Wallburg in North Carolina.A Delta flight carrying Mr Corbett’s remains touched down this Thursday morning in Dublin Airport after the Kevin Bell Repatriation Trust assisted the Corbett family with the arrangements.The trust offers financial assistance to bereaved families to repatriate bodies of their loved ones who have died abroad in sudden or tragic circumstances.Trust co-founder Colin Bell said he was pleased that the trust could help.“This is what we do, this is why we set up the trust, to help people in this situation,” he explained. Mr Bell’s son Kevin was 26 when he was killed in an accident in New York in June 2013 and hss death led Mr Bell and his wife Eithne to establish the trust.The first steps in securing Jack and Sarah Corbett’s future will be decided on this Friday when the children’s legal guardians attempt to secure a ruling allowing them to return home to Ireland.Social media campaigns, personal tributes, petitions and fundraising activities have all been initiated in Ireland in support of the young Corbett children with calls being made for Government intervention at the highest level.The expenditure facing the Corbett family is set to run into the tens of thousands and donations to help fund #jasonsjourney and to #bringjacksarahhome are being accepted through Limerick bank accounts and online. Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories NewsBreaking newsThe end of Jason’s journeyBy Staff Reporter – August 13, 2015 1213 Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Linkedin TAGS#bringjacksarahhome#jasonsjourneyJanesboroJason Corbettlimericknorth carolinapanther creek courtUSwallburg Emailcenter_img Advertisement Twitter Print Previous article€13 million for social housing units in LimerickNext articleLimerick teens leading the way Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Norwegian will not resume Shannon flights

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Print Facebook Exercise With Oxygen Training at Ultimate Health Clinic Limerick on Covid watch list Previous articleWATCH: John Kiely names much-changed team for Thurles tripNext articleConn Murray’s name written large in the annals of Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin BUDGET airline Norwegian has confirmed that it will not resume its transatlantic flights from Shannon and Cork this year.A spokesperson for Shannon Group said they were disappointed for its passengers with the news that Norwegian was unable to resume operations as a result of the continued grounding of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “The world-wide grounding of the 737 Max aircraft is having a serious impact for Shannon passengers. Proportionally, no other Irish airport has such a high level of activity operated by the 737 Max aircraft.“At peak this aircraft type would have operated 13 weekly flights from Shannon to North America. We now estimate that the loss of these flights, which include this year’s Air Canada service, will mean a loss of over 120,000 seats at Shannon in 2019 and as a result our overall passenger numbers will be down.“We remain confident that once the 737 Max aircraft is back flying that these services will be restored, as they were extremely popular in 2018″, the statement concluded.by Tom [email protected] NewsBusinessTransportNorwegian will not resume Shannon flightsBy Staff Reporter – June 15, 2019 765 center_img Twitter Ann & Steve Talk Stuff | Episode 29 | Levelling Up WhatsApp Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Email Limerick businesses urged to accept Irish Business Design Challenge TAGSbusinessClareIrelandLimerick City and CountyNewsShannonTransport TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type!last_img read more

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