Category: fsftinqw

PHOTOS: Aqueous At Rough Trade NYC In Brooklyn, NY 12/1/17

first_imgLoad remaining images On the 1st of December, Buffalo groove-rock favorites Aqueous stopped by Rough Trade NYC in Brooklyn, NY as part of their ongoing fall tour. The two-set show allowed for the quartet to expand on some of their originals, insert new surprises, and weave their way through a full evening of rock and roll. With teases of Phish, Zelda, Peanuts, Jimi Hendrix, and the Grateful Dead peppered throughout the show, and a full execution of Elton John‘s tough-to-sing “Bennie and the Jets”, Aqueous impressed fans old and new with their unique ability to shred old school favorites with their new school attitude.Aqueous & Dopapod Teased Each Other’s Songs From Across The Country Last NightCheck out the band’s setlist below, as well as full galleries from Chris Capaci of Capacity Images and Andrew O’Brien of OBImages. Head to Aqueous’s official website for all information on upcoming dates, tickets, and band news.Setlist: Aqueous | Rough Trade NYC | Brooklyn, NY | 12/1/17I: They’re Calling For Ya > All In^, Mosquito Valley Pt I* > Mosquito Valley Pt. IIII: Strange Times**+%•, Dave’s Song*** > Bennie and The Jets^^, 20/20Encore: Gordon’s Mule^Tweezer (Phish) tease*Song of Storms (Zelda) tease**Linus and Lucy (Peanuts) teases+Saria’s Song (Zelda) tease%Third Stone from the Sun (Jimi Hendrix) teases•What’s the connection teases***Fire on the Mountain (Grateful Dead) tease^^Elton John2017 Aqueous Tour Dates12/5 – Columbia, MO – Rose Music Hall *12/6 – Omaha, NE – Reverb Lounge *12/9 – Frisco, CO – Barkley Ballroom *12/12 – Davenport, IA – Redstone Room *12/13 – St. Louis, MO – Bootleg @ Atomic Cowboy *12/14 – Lexington, KY – Cosmic Charlie’s *12/15 – Columbus, OH – Woodlands Tavern *12/16 – Pittsburgh, PA – Rex Theater *12/31 – Buffalo, NY – Town Ballroom *1/17 – 1/22 – Miami, FL – Jam CruiseAqueous | Rough Trade NYC | Brooklyn, NY | 12/1/17 | Photos by Capacity Images Load remaining imagescenter_img Aqueous | Rough Trade NYC | Brooklyn, NY | 12/1/17 | Photos by Andrew O’Brienlast_img read more

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Study finds HIPAA protected data still at risks

first_imgThe research paper titled “Risks to Patient Privacy: A Re-identification of Patients in Maine and Vermont Statewide Hospital Data,” reveals that patients’ personal records in hospitals can still be re-identified even when data identifiers such as names and addresses were removed to follow the HIPAA Safe Harbor de-identification guidelines.The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, otherwise known as HIPAA, provides privacy rules to protect patient data in hospitals as well as the data held by health insurance providers. However, a 2013 survey found cases of disclosed patient data in 33 out of 48 states. This was later followed by a study that re-identified 43 percent of individuals from Washington state by correctly matching their hospital data to local newspaper articles and anonymized hospital visit records.To find out if the case was only unique to Washington state, and if other states were safe from data re-identification, this study tested the health data from Maine and Vermont using the same re-identification methods. Findings show that 28.3 percent of individuals in Maine and 34 percent of individuals in Vermont were successfully re-identified.“Such findings suggest that patients’ personal information is vulnerable to re-identification even when hospital data is de-identified according to HIPAA Safe Harbor guidelines,” the authors of study concluded. “We call for more rigorous inquiry on the vulnerabilities that exist even when following HIPAA Safe Harbor as a standard for de-identification.”Re-identified patient data is important because it reveals sensitive information that can be misused without the patient’s consent.  The study suggests all states to improve de-identification practices and guarantee patient data protection.The paper was authored by  Ji Su Yoo, research analyst at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science; Alexandra Thaler ’19; Latanya Sweeney, professor of Government and Technology in Residence; and Jinyan Zang, Ph.D. candidate in government. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Pharma-to-doc marketing a vulnerability in opioid fight

first_imgPharmaceutical companies’ television ads have come under fire for pitching drugs to consumers, but another marketing tactic, behind closed doors and often ignored, is perhaps even more troubling, according to one expert.Harvard health economist Meredith Rosenthal said drug companies also pitch their wares directly to doctors through an array of tactics, including face-to-face marketing, in a little-scrutinized process that may be ripe for regulation.“What goes on behind closed doors might require a totally different approach,” Rosenthal said.Rosenthal cited a 2019 study that showed that, though direct-to-consumer advertising grew most rapidly — more than fourfold, to $9.6 billion — between 1997 and 2016 that total was dwarfed by the $20.3 billion the industry spent marketing to physicians. Included in that total were direct payments to doctors for things such as speaking fees, free samples, face-to-face pitches by drug company representatives, and disease education efforts.Rosenthal, the C. Boyden Gray Professor of Health Economics and Policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said though physicians claim they aren’t influenced by sales visits, recent studies showed that doctors’ attitudes toward the drugs more closely echo pharmaceutical company pitches than the findings of published scientific studies.Harvard Chan School Professor Meredith Rosenthal said drug companies pitch their wares directly to doctors through an array of tactics. Photo by Kara Gavin“Pharmaceutical marketing … is ubiquitous,” Rosenthal said. “Studies have shown that despite physicians denying relying on pharmaceutical messaging, attitudes are closer to that than to scientific evidence.”Rosenthal made her comments during an all-day conference focused on the opioid epidemic. Called “Opioids: Policy to Practice,” the event was co-sponsored by Harvard and the University of Michigan.Held in Ypsilanti, Mich., the conference was the first of two examining the issue. Billed as a “University of Michigan ‒ Harvard University Summit,” the event stemmed from an agreement last fall between the two universities that the Harvard Chan School and the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network would collaborate to find scalable solutions to the opioid epidemic.The second summit will be held next October at Harvard. The collaboration on the opioid epidemic was just one of two partnerships between the universities struck in the fall. The second, focused on boosting economic opportunity in Detroit, pairs Harvard’s Equality of Opportunity Project and the University of Michigan’s Poverty Solutions initiative, the city of Detroit, and community partners.The opioid summit, held May 10, featured Harvard and University of Michigan experts, as well as authorities from a variety of outside organizations. University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel and Chad Brummett, co-director of the Michigan Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network, delivered opening remarks.Brummett and Mary Bassett, the Francios-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights and director of the Harvard Chan School’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, co-chaired the event. Bassett, the former commissioner of health for New York City, spoke on a panel discussing the public health response from urban to rural communities. Michael Barnett, assistant professor of health policy and management at the Harvard Chan School, participated on a panel discussing health systems approaches to opioid prescribing.Barbara McQuade, a professor from practice at the University of Michigan Law School, said the conference represented exactly the kind of collaboration between an array of fields that’s needed to solve the problem.McQuade cautioned that interventions and public policies should be carefully considered so they don’t have unintended consequences like those that occurred when cracking down on prescription drug abuse pushed addicts to more dangerous heroin and fentanyl.Craig Summers, executive director of the Michigan High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, a federal grant program to coordinate law enforcement anti-drug efforts, said that access to real-time data about overdoses and deaths will improve law enforcement’s ability to fight drug traffickers. Timely data, he said, means the difference between getting a fentanyl dealer off the street when overdoses are first detected and waiting until several deaths occur.Traffickers, Summers said, aren’t interested in the epidemic’s human toll — they’re only interested in making money, and will fill a demand wherever it is. That means prevention efforts and programs to reach young children with anti-drug messages are critical. Summers also said that, though the focus is on opioids, large amounts of cocaine and methamphetamine are also coming into the state.“The cartels have one objective and one objective only: to make money,” Summers said. “They have no regard for human life. If there’s a demand, they will find a way to serve it.”In addition to talks by academic experts and leaders from the epidemic’s front lines, the event included comments by David Clayton, outreach coordinator for Families Against Narcotics. Clayton shared his personal experience with addiction and said that his life shows what a difference effective treatment can make. He has been clean and sober since 2013.Clayton grew up in a stable household, an athlete and a good student. He became addicted to prescription painkillers at age 18 and doctor-shopped to get the drugs, visiting up to five doctors, until he was found out and cut off. By age 21, estranged from his family, he sniffed heroin for the first time. At 24, he became an intravenous drug user.Clayton recalled one occasion when he agreed to go to rehab. As he waited to leave, he rummaged through boxes of his belongings in his parents’ basement looking for leftover drugs to ease his withdrawal, and came across funeral prayer cards with his name on them, evidence that his mother was planning his funeral. Instead of rehab, he crawled out of the basement window and left.In September 2013, intent on killing himself with drugs, he got arrested instead. He was sent to treatment and then to a “sober house” to live. Instead of dying that day, he said, he got his life back. Today, he owns a house and works traveling the state to fight addiction.“Recovery is possible,” Clayton said. “Sept. 23, 2013, I wanted to end my life. It was the last day I had to use drugs and alcohol. It was the last day drugs and alcohol told me when to wake up and when to sleep.”last_img read more

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NAE elects engineering professor

first_imgThe National Academy of Engineers (NAE) elected Joan Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, to their prestigious organization earlier this month. Membership in the governmental-based non-profit group is considered among the top titles an American engineer can hold, Brennecke said. Of the 1,100 members in the NAE, 156 are chemical engineers. “It’s a recognition by your peers that you’ve made significant contribution to chemical engineering,” she said. “It’s sort of like a lifetime achievement award. Kind of a stamp of approval that you’ve really made a difference, and that feels great.” Brennecke said election to the NAE is based on a scholar’s entire contribution to the industry. Brennecke said fellow engineering professor Dr. Ahsan Kareem is the only other NAE member inducted while at Notre Dame. “When people look at schools and ranking universities, they’ll look at the National Academy to determine if it’s a top place,” Brennecke said. “So, for the university, it’s really important.” Brennecke said her research specializes in the use of ionic liquids and supercritical fluids for environmentally benign chemical processing. Brennecke has three postdoctoral, 11 graduate and seven undergraduate students working in her Ionic Liquids Lab. “In my 23 years here, we have seen huge growth in external research funding the number of Ph.D. students,” Brennecke said. “That has been important to me because I’ve been able to do research that I’m interested in.” The focus on undergraduate teaching is also a very important facet of Notre Dame, she said. “Notre Dame has provided me with the opportunity to teach really great students in a setting where teaching is valued and appreciated,” Brennecke said. “Notre Dame is very committed to enhancing and growing our graduate programs.” Brennecke said Notre Dame is a wonderful environment to work in since the research conducted on campus makes a difference. “Notre Dame has created an environment that’s very conducive to doing great research,” she said. Brennecke said her election is advantageous for both her work and the university. “Everybody tells me it’s great for me, the department and Notre Dame,” Brennecke said. “It’s great that we’re being recognized here.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame cancels spring 2021 study abroad

first_imgNotre Dame announced it would cancel all spring 2021 study abroad programs due to the continued number of coronavirus cases in a Tuesday morning email.According to the email, the University had been in contact with partner institutions and global gateways prior to the decision. Ultimately, programs were canceled due to several factors, including the continued state of the pandemic, travel restrictions and quarantine protocols for entering and exiting the United States.“We understand how disheartening and disappointing this is, especially for those who may not have another opportunity to study abroad,” the email said. ”…Regrettably, the ongoing pandemic makes this impossible at the moment; your health and safety must come first.”The Study Abroad office will work closely with students to offer options to study aboard in summer or fall 2021.“We remain committed in finding alternative opportunities for your international education,” the email said.Tags: coronavirus, Notre Dame International, spring study abroad 2021last_img read more

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Norway’s Equinor continues renewables expansion, ups stake in solar company

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Norway’s Equinor has bought a 9.7 percent stake in renewable energy producer Scatec Solar, raising its ownership to 10 percent, the state-controlled energy firm said on Thursday.“The investment in Scatec Solar will increase Equinor’s exposure to a fast growing renewable sector, further complementing Equinor’s portfolio with profitable solar energy,” Equinor said in a statement. “This is in line with our strategy to develop into a broad energy company,” it said.It paid 700 million Norwegian crowns ($82.55 million) for the stake, corresponding to about 63.5 crowns per share, a premium of 4.8 percent over Wednesday’s closing price on the Oslo stock market.In partnership with Scatec, Equinor entered its first solar development project in 2017 in Brazil, followed by a second joint project in Argentina in June 2018.Equinor has also invested heavily in offshore wind turbine projects.More: Equinor takes Scatec stake in solar energy push Norway’s Equinor continues renewables expansion, ups stake in solar companylast_img read more

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Wolf Administration Welcomes 20 Students with Disabilities for Summer Internship Program

first_imgWolf Administration Welcomes 20 Students with Disabilities for Summer Internship Program SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Government That Works,  Innovation,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – In support of the Employment First initiative to help people with disabilities find employment, the Wolf Administration is welcoming 20 Pennsylvania college students who will participate in summer internships with state agencies, while a first-of-its kind state partnership with Microsoft will promote accessibility best practices and tools.“Internships are an important way for students to gain experience in their field of study and establish relationships with potential employers,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “This program will provide valuable opportunities in public service to students with disabilities.”The students will take part in a 12-week paid internship in the Harrisburg area beginning this month. The interns will work in positions related to their academic backgrounds and career interests.Governor Wolf signed the executive order to establish the Employment First policy in March 2016 to increase competitive-integrated employment for people with disabilities and make Pennsylvania a model state when it comes to creating a climate hospitable to disabled workers.The internship program was developed by the Department of Labor and Industry’s (L&I) Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Office of Administration (OA). OVR recruited college students for the inaugural class, while OA facilitated placement within state offices.“We want to thank the commonwealth’s leaders and supervisors for supporting the disability internship program and welcoming these students for the summer,” said Secretary of Administration Sharon Minnich. “We think it will be an enriching experience for everyone involved.”OVR provides vocational rehabilitation services to help persons with disabilities prepare for, obtain, or maintain employment. In 2017, the office helped place more than 9,300 OVR customers into employment, and connected with 6,000 Pennsylvania employers to achieve hiring results.“When it comes to providing employment opportunities to people with disabilities, we need to lead by example,” said L&I Secretary Jerry Oleksiak. “We are excited to work with the Office of Administration to offer this internship program for state government.”The administration also announced that Pennsylvania is the first state government to partner with Microsoft Corporation to provide training and other resources on accessibility to employees. The training will focus on tools available within Office 365 to make documents and other files accessible to people with disabilities, as well as features that can assist commonwealth employees who are themselves disabled. Employees will also have access to a help desk staffed by accessibility experts to answer questions and provide guidance. These services are being provided at no additional cost to the commonwealth.“We are incredibly excited about working with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to educate employees on how to be more inclusive and accessible using the built-in tools in Microsoft365,” said Megan Lawrence, Microsoft’s Accessibility Technical Evangelist.center_img May 22, 2018last_img read more

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Waterfront home for sale with holidays flats and DA approval

first_imgThe property at 159 Margate Pde, Margate, includes a character home with water views. Picture: supplied.This seaside home ticks boxes you didn’t even know existed. The 1595sq m north-facing block overlooks Margate Beach and comes with a beautiful character home, five flats for extra income and development approval for four levels of luxury units.Owners Paul and Julie Borger have called 159 Margate Pde home for the past 25 years and have loved raising their four children across the road from Moreton Bay. “It’s been just lovely. We’re right across from the beach and we never get tired at looking at the water. It’s always changing and we always get a bit of a breeze,” Mrs Borger said. “Our children have had a lovely time growing up here and now our grandkids play at the beach across the road.” Fairytale renovation comes true Mrs Borger said after many years of hosting guests from around the world, it was now her and her husband’s time to travel.“We’ve listened to peoples’ stories for years and now it’s our turn to be tourists,” she said.Mrs Borger said they would be sad to say goodbye to their home but the time was right. “We did the home up in 2013, so it’s very comfortable,” she said. The house has VJ walls, stained glass windows and timber floors. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours ago MasterChef contestant lists Brisbane pad with showstopper kitchencenter_img The property at 159 Margate Pde, Margate. Picture: supplied. MORE NEWS: Luxury Whitsundays apartments come with marina berths The view from the front deck of 159 Margate Pde, Margate. Picture: supplied.The open-plan living and dining room has ocean views and opens to the front deck and sunroom. The eat-in kitchen has plenty of cupboard space. The master bedroom has a walk-in wardrobe and ensuite and there is a study nook, second bedroom and powder room. A self-contained studio has a kitchenette and bathroom while a second flat has a kitchen, living and dining area, a bedroom and a bathroom. There are three more units in a separate building. The property has 60m of ocean-facing frontage and is close to shops, public transport and schools. The property is being marketed by Rosslyn Kennedy of Gateway Properties.last_img read more

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Berry repeats, young Murty wins Family Feud at Benton County Speedway

first_imgTony Olson drove to the front from the starting 13th position in the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod main event. Olson took the lead from his cousin Kyle, who later retired with an overheat­ing engine. Olson went on to record the win ahead of Dylan VanWyk and Ben Chapman. Damon got inside of his son in turn four coming to the white flag but contact was made sending the younger Murty into a spin. Officials ruled the contact initiated by the elder Murty as rough driv­ing sending him to the back for a green, white, checkered restart. Dallon went on to record the win over Jay Schmidt and Dustin Vis.   The IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks saw another classic battle between Kaden Reynolds, Nathan Ballard and Brett Vanous. Reynolds got to the front first and went on to record the 15-lap feature win.   Tom Berry Jr. repeated his IMCA Modified winning ways Sunday at Benton County Speedway. (Photo by Jim Wittke) VINTON, Iowa (June 21) – Sunday night racing action was held at the Benton County Speedway despite afternoon showers that threatened the racing program. The rains stayed to the north allow­ing the racing to be held and a very fast program was held with the final checkered flag of the night waving at 7:52 pm.  Tom Berry Jr. scored his second win of the season at The Bullring by topping a strong field of IMCA Modifieds in their 20-lap feature. Mark Schulte led the first half of the race until Berry was able to slide inside of him in turn four on lap 11. Berry cruised on to the win with Schulte holding off Ryan Duhme at the finish line.   By Jerry Mackey   The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature saw plenty of fireworks as the main event turned into a fam­ily battle between Dallon Murty and his dad Damon. The younger Murty took the lead near the halfway point of the race but was not able to shake several other contenders which included his dad.  Sunday, June 28 will see another full night of racing at the Benton County Speedway plus kids will be treated to the World’s largest candy scramble with over 1,100 pounds of candy available for the grabbing. Hot laps will get underway at 4:30 p.m. with racing to follow.last_img read more

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Lee L. Lynn – Rushville

first_imgLee L. Lynn, of Rushville, was born on June 16, 1940 in Maryville, TN, a son to James and Betty Buford Lynn.  Lee was a self employed sales rep. throughout his life.  He founded Lynn Electric Co. in 1969 and continued on with it until the early 80’s.  Lee was the first Delaware County Building Commissioner and he also started several other businesses throughout his life.  He was a member of Chapel Missionary Baptist Church in Lakeview, a Mason at the Metamora Masonic Lodge #156, and a Shriner.  Lee loved to be around people, especially family and friends.  On Sunday, October 20, 2019, at the age of 79, Lee passed away peacefully at Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie, Indiana.Those surviving who will cherish Lee’s memory include his son; Terry (fiancé Tracey Adams) of TN; one granddaughter, Nicole (Ryan) Wheeler of Peru, IN; three great-grandchildren, Cameron, Mason, and Sophie; two sisters, Margaret Maddok of St. Louis, MO and Jo Ann Goodman of Lakeland, FL; as well as several nieces and nephews.  Besides his parents, and stepmother Mary Lea, Lee was preceded in death by his wife, Sue Lynn; two brothers, Joe and Winston Lynn; three sisters, Jean McElhaney, Juanita Bumbalough, and Ruth Goforth; as well as several nephews.Friends may visit with the family on Friday, October 25, 2019 from 5-8 p.m. and again from 10-11 a.m. Saturday morning at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 929 Main Street, Brookville.  Funeral service will be conducted at 11 a.m. Saturday, October 26, 2019.  Burial will follow immediately in Metamora Cemetery.Memorial contributions can be directed to the Shriner’s Children or to the Metamora Masonic Lodge #156.  To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal memory, please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Lee Lynn.last_img read more

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